VANCOUVER COAL MINING AND LAND COMPANY:
LETTERBOOK, 1873-1883
 
Notice: We recommend that you review our Historical Language Advisory before reading this transcript.  
 
Transcribed by Marv Worden, 2006-7, Revised 2023
 
 
Series 1. Administrative records
Letterbook, 14 March 1873 - 14 July 1883
 

14 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Wild

I am favored with your kind letter of the 1st Feb’y and will not fail to give its contents due attention. I did not fail to notice the large amount of cash assets appearing in the last Balance sheet, and I think that a most reassuring feature in all such papers.

You are aware that I have for a long time believed it would be to the interest of the Company to get a hold, the best obtainable in the Comox field, but it is more than probable we are now too late. Some Gentlemen at San Francisco are in association with the Union Company, whose claim I think most of, and I hardly know if it would be wise to make any proposition while negotiations with other parties are pending. I think perhaps I might acquire the shares of one or two of our workmen, but I doubt very much if they will just now submit any proposal to us to take over (Page 2) the whole concern. You will perceive by the Mineral Amendment Ordinance, which I forward in my official letter today, Clause 5, that any prospecting License issued under the former Act is transferable. This will give the Hon[ourable] Dr. Ash an opportunity to get rid of his Beaufort coal lands. Baynes Sound, it is understood out here, is disposed of by Mr. Pemberton who I think is in London. In the course of a week or two, I shall know if anything can be done with the Union Shareholders.

You will greatly regret to learn of the fresh run of water into the mine. It will throw us back considerably. If we can keep the passage open till dry weather, we shall soon get over the difficulty. The pumps can take out all the extra water thrown into the works from the swamp so long as it goes in gradually. If a large body accumulates and breaks in with a rush, we shall be kept in trouble for a lengthy period. Everything possible will be done to keep the swamp dry and if we can succeed in this, three weeks, I believe will see the mine levels drained again.

Hoping you are well and with kind remembrances

I remain

Yours very Sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 3)

15 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

In acknowledging the receipt of your kind favor of the 6th inst, I am pleased to say that instead of having 4 feet of clean coal at the new seam we have over 5 1/2 feet. Everything connected with the seam is favourable for working.

I thought the new seam Coal was taking well in Victoria for House purposes. Broderick & Co order more of the new than the old, but last month they did not get a single pound from us for retail in Victoria--only a few tons were taken for the use of the 'Emma', and I am not aware that they received any coal from the Wellington mine excepting for the navy. It is a query how they supply their customers! They surely can't have many.

You would be sorry to hear of the new influx of water in the mine. As far as can be ascertained, there is no additional damage done, nor do I think the roads we had partly cleared will be covered up again. The pumps are going steadily and I am glad to say are beating the water down. Extremely wet weather is keeping everything in arrears.

! did not fail to impress upon the men at Newcastle the absolute necessity of well cleaning the coals for the 'Prince Alfred'. Will you kindly let us know if there is any complaint of slate being found in the coal? If it is not well cleaned, the best thing we can do is to take the loading out of the hands of the Contractors and get our usual outside hands to do the work whenever they are available.

We are very sorry to hear that Mr. Bermingham has not been very well of late. Emily said she would rather you could letter [sic] us you were all well then she would receive her pictures. Her Grandmother in England is so delighted with her photograph that she has sent quite a requisition for them for our friends.

I get a copy of the Commercial Herald by every trip of the 'Prince Alfred'. If you have to purchase a copy for me, I want to pay for it, because it seems an expensive paper.

Emily sends her best love to Mrs. Bermingham and the children and accept for yourself the best wishes of us all.

from Yours very truly

M. Bate

P.S. I have omitted to mention that we have another addition to our family- a daughter.

(Page 5)

27 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

As you may suppose I was much pleased to learn by yours of the 20th inst. that the 'Prince Alfred' got along very well in her first voyage with the Newcastle Coal, and I hope similar ref. will continue to be given by your Engineer. I will [try?] my utmost to see the Coal is well cleaned, and then I believe it will go well. Years ago, it had a better reputation for steamers than the Douglas. In about three months, we shall prepare to get further to the dip of the Newcastle seam, and probably, as we go down, there will be less slate and shale between the coal.

I hear Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are in want of cash. Probably that is why they are so anxious to send coal away to San Francisco. They have shipped none to Victoria the past month that I know of so that (Page 6) all they get I suppose will go to Bickard. The ‘Dominga' is now at Wellington mine loading for your market. Bickard has more than once reported to me as unsafe. Quite later, I hear the contract with the Wellington Co is not in his name, but in that of Welch, Rithet & Co.

The last time Capt. Bailey was here with the ['Lurline’?], he told me our coal had heated in the steamer’s bunkers. On enquiry into the matter, I found the coal was taken in here on the 7th of Feb’y, very wet with snow, and stored pretty close to the boiler - a situation and condition highly conducive to firing. I know the Douglas Coal is very quick of action. A lucifer match would almost set it going and being placed near a hot boiler when very wet it would certainly have every incentive to spontaneous combustion. This is the first case, where under any circumstance, I have ever heard of our coal heating up this way.

The 'King Philip' got here this morning towed up by the 'Cyrus Walker’. The ['James Cheston’?] and [‘Powkattain' ?] did not get away until the 23rd- waiting several days for a steamer. The 'Cheston' was towed on a sand bank in the harbour which detained her another day.

Many thanks to you for sending Emily's photographs. Please let me have bill for cost of them.

On the 21st inst., I wrote to Mr. Rosenfeld intimating that it would be well if it could be done to keep the 'Arkwright' away. If she has to come, of course we shall do our best to load her, but I fear she would be detained during next month. I trust I shall be able to report more encouragingly of our output.

[Receive?] Emily and Mrs. Bate's kind regards and their best wishes.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 7)

4 April 73

My Dear Mother

Your letter dated 20th Jan’y I duly received through David Botham, and I was very much pained to hear from you how very unwell you have been, but relieved a little when I read that part of your letter which stated that your health was improving. I know, my dear Mother, that it must be uphill work to get along comfortably as things are now at home, and I pray that you may be blest with strength to bear any privations to which you may be subjected. I shall enclose in this half a sovereign, and about two weeks after you receive that, you may expect something more substantial. It would grieve me sorely to know that you suffered from anything I can provide. Thank God I am in a position to take care of you as far as money can do it, but what I send you I certainly hope will be applied in a proper way. I mean to keep you comfortable at your House. Get all the clothing you need and all that is necessary to eat and drink. It does me good to hear from you that father-in-law is steady and I trust he will continue in that course. If we are spared, we shall all see each other again before long.

I am very sorry to hear of my (Page 8) cousin Joseph Robinson being hurt so badly. I sincerely hope that he is not so seriously injured as you think he is. If he is getting better, please let me know and say if he is in want of anything. Tell him also how sorry I am to hear of his misfortune and to give my kind love to him. I shall indeed be glad to get a portrait of my Uncle and other Niece and trust I shall get both it and a note soon. Tell him I say you must bother him until he sends them. You forgot to tell me what you thought of Emily's Photograph. I send you one now of Elizabeth's husband. He was here a few days ago and they all desire me to convey their best love to you. I have never had a letter from Ann, which you inform me she wrote last June. If she sent one it has miscarried, which is quite an unusual thing. Since I last wrote to you, we have another addition to our family. A girl whom we call Elizabeth after you. All of us are pretty well. Emily, Mark, and Sarah Anne are growing up fast. Thomas and George are also getting fine boys. Lucy is a little darling, as you will see by her picture which I send you herewith. Sarah Anne wants to get one of my photographs that was taken some 12 or 13 years ago. If you have one, dear Mother, would you please forward it to us. Sarah Anne wants to have a painting made from it. Sarah Anne desires me to [send her best love?]

Dear Mother makes a similar request.

Remember us to all our Uncles Aunts and Cousins and oblige

Your affectionate Son

Mark.

 

(Page 9)

9 April 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I last evening received your favour of the 25th ultimo and telegram of the 5th. The latter read "I did not "go up Alfred will go out Nanaimo" By which I infer you are not coming on the 'Prince Alfred' and that the steamer is not coming to Nanaimo. I regret to have to state that by tomorrow night All our Coal and dross will be cleared away. Since I wrote to Mr. Rosenfeld this morning, the 'California' has arrived for a full cargo of Coal for the Portland Gas Co. and 120 tons shale for own use. I propose giving the 'California' 50 or 60 tons of large Coal which will enable the Gas Co. to get along for a month or so. By that time, our position will be greatly improved.

The main difficulty about the 'Arkwright' away will be the detention she may meet with, of course if she makes a longer passage than is calculated on, we might give her better dispatch than we supposed. I am thinking….

(Page 10) perhaps Capt. Daly would go to the new mines to fill up, but I hardly know if I should be doing right in furnishing Coal without instructions.

Owing to heavy rains, we have had a terrible job with water. Happily, the machinery goes well and our great difficulty is now well nigh over.

I will write again soon and in the meantime we shall do everything possible to push work ahead.

I need scarcely say how glad I shall be to see you up here.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 11)

5th May 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I duly received your kind favour of the 5th and 19th ultimo, but in the expectation of seeing you by the last trip of the 'Prince Alfred' I did not write in acknowledgment of the former.

I am much concerned to hear of the complaint respecting the Newcastle Coal and earnestly hope that better reports will be given of it in future, A cargo taken from the Newcastle mine this month has cleared away the heap, much to my surprise, and I find, on examining the returns handed in by the contractor, that he is several hundred tons short, and my friend Bryden has been astray at least 300 tons in his estimate of the coal heaped outside. We shall have to make a change at once in the working of the Newcastle Coal, and get further to the deep of the seams. In the meantime, while there is no Newcastle out, we shall have to ship the new Douglas for the 'Prince Alfred'.

Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are getting to the wharf about 50 tons of coal a day. The 'Wellington' and 'Shooting Star' both got into Departure Bay the same

(Page 12) day. The former is not yet fitted up while the latter was loaded at the new mine on the morning of the 2nd and sailed yesterday with a fine fair wind down the Gulf. The 'Wellington' I think takes about 800 tons. The 'Constitution' arrived at the Wellington mine yesterday, for another cargo for Bickard, and Dunsmuir tells me he looks for some other small craft and that he has about 900 tons of coal at the Bay.

I am glad to say the old Douglas mine is drained once more. The water is lower than it has been the last year but we don’t get out coal enough. The average for this month, according to Mr. Bryden's estimate, is to be 100 tons per diem. I fear, however, that the output will fall short of this.

The 'Arkwright' has on board 700 tons, and has a prospect of getting coal just about as fast it will be stored away. Some of this crew have got into difficulty for selling whiskey to Indians, and I believe 4 or 6 have been sent to the chain gang in Victoria. And owing to the shortness of his crew, Capt. Harris seems disinclined to have his ship taken to the new mine,

I look for your arrival by the next trip of the 'Prince Alfred' and need scarcely repeat how pleased I shall be to see you.

Accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate, Emily and of [?]

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 13)

3 May, 73

My Dear Mother

I wrote to you some three weeks ago, sending half a sovereign, and telling you that you may expect something more substantial in the course of a week or two. I now enclose a Bill of Exchange for 5 Pounds which is money sent to me by Elizabeth and her husband for you. As soon as you get it, write to me, dear Mother, if only a very short note. Also write to Elizabeth and her husband thanking them for their great goodness. Mr. Horne was here a week or two ago and all of the family were well. I hear from him nearly every week and I am always requested to give their best love to you.

I had a letter from Thomas Hughes the other day, which I was much pleased to receive. I shall write to him soon and if you should see him please tell him so, at the same time kindly remember me to him. I have also just got a letter from my dear sister Anne. I need hardly tell you the good it has done me to get a few lines from her. She tells me you showed her my Mark photo when she was at Holly Hall and that it reminded her of (Page 14) me when I was about his age. A great many people think that one painting of myself is intended for him. He is growing very fast and he is really a robust looking boy. On the 16th of this month, he will be 13 years old.

You will be glad to hear that our little one is quite well. Elizabeth seems quite proud that we have named the baby after you and her Lucy is here two or three times every week and Sarah Anne is frequently urging her to write to you and she promises to do so. Is there any little cottage property that you know of near to you that I could buy, I mean a patch of ground with a cottage or [small?] House upon it. I suppose you still live in the same place as you did when I left Home?

Have you seen my Uncle George since he returned to England? He would be able to tell you all about myself and the rest of us. Aunt Marie talks of going Home before long. I have sent papers to my cousin William Bate lately and I hope he gets them. Please remember me to him and ask him to write a few lines to me. Also give our kind love to my Uncle and Aunt Ranger and to Uncle John [Neals?] and Uncle Thomas Bryant, Aunt Eleanor and all other relatives, all of whom I often think of.

Emily and Mark and Sally and perhaps Tommy too will be writing to you one of these days so that you can see what the little folks have to say for themselves.

Sarah Anne sends her best love to you and father-in-law.

And accept the same Dear Mother from your ever affectionate Son

Mark.

(Page 15)

 

22 May 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your telegram of the 17th reached me on the 19th. With regard to giving a supply of fuel to the 'Prince Alfred' I may state that we have not just now either coal or dross in stock on this side, and we have the 'James Cheston' at the Island. The 'Arkwright' sailed yesterday with 1885 tons and we have the 'Black Diamond' and 'Emma' loading for the 'Prince' with old Douglas Coal today.

Tomorrow, if nothing comes along, we shall begin to accumulate - Saturday the 24th will be a holiday, and by the following Monday 26th I look for the 'California' from Sitka. She will (Page 16) require, I suppose, about 200 tons.

You will thus see exactly how we are fixed. Should the 'California' not arrive as expected, we shall be able to give the 'Prince Albert' by Monday night somewhere about 2000 tons but I think it is very probable the 'California' will be here by the time stated. After Monday night, say the 'California' arrived in the meantime, we shall be turning out fully [300?] tons per day. You will hardly, however, feel like bringing the 'Prince' up here without knowing fuel is obtainable - unless you want to beach her. At all events, I shall look for you no later than Tuesday. Mr. Bell doubtless will wish to get as early as possible to this place; you might perhaps get [?] to come up if you are ready to start the day before the 'Douglas' sails?

Kindly hand the enclosed letter to Mr. Bell.

I have room for you both at my house and with best wishes believe me.

Yours very truly

M Bate

(Page 17)

 

11 June 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind letter of the 4th written in 'Olympia' came to hand last evening. [Brodrister's?] charge for the use of the 'Emma' is very reasonable. We have to thank for your good offices in the matter. I have been stiff and sore since we returned from Comox, and I don't know when I'm going to get right again. I hope Mr. Bell will be quite himself ere he reaches San Francisco. If he had not taken his departure before this got into your hands, please inform him that up to last evening, there was no change reported in the Newcastle Douglas Slope- Very little headway, however, has been made in the sinking since he left. In the old Newcastle Slope, a much improved face of coal is presented set in the (Page 18) main slope of the Douglas pit the deepening of which had just commenced when Mr. Bell was here, we had a splendid clean piece of coal 7 feet thick- without a band or parting of any kind. As regards the work generally, everything seems to be going along in the usual steady way. No sign of the 'Atlanta' yet. I begin to think she is not coming to us for the present. If she has gone to the [Mills?] ,of course, we can take some other craft soon after the ['Leister'?] is loaded - say by the 18th or 19th.

Next week the Engines at the Islands I trust will pull out considerable coal. We are to do big things here between this and the end of the month.

Remember me kindly to Mr. Bell and please ask him to accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate and Emily and the same please accept yourself.

from yours very truly

M Bate

 

(Page 19)

10 June 73

Dear Mr. Wild

Your kind favour of the 2nd of May I received last week. I am extremely obliged to you for giving your attention of the purchase of shares in the Company's stock on my account.

Perhaps a knowledge of the flood in the mine may have the effect of bringing down the premiums after the General Meeting, but I am satisfied whether that result is brought about or not. Shares will be as valuable henceforward as they have been hitherto.

I am much interested with the particulars you were good enough to give referring to negotiations about the Harewood property. It would be quite safe to say that none of the Douglas pit coal will run under Harewood. A tracing of the mine plan carried away by Mr. Bell will show that the [?], if it continues the same course as where stopped, will go under the Bay before Chase River is reached, giving a fine piece of coal to the [rise? river?]. I am unable to state what area of Douglas Coal may be found on the Harewood Estate. (I don't think it can be much if any) but there is no doubt a considerable extent of the under seam, some 40 acres of which it is said might be worked level free. 6000 pounds seems a large sum for the Harewood property, especially when it is borne in mind that, as far as is known, not one third of the Estate is coal bearing. My idea is that all (Page 20) the Company need care about obtaining from Lord George Hamilton is that portion of his property bounded by the Company's South line, starting from Chase River- thence, from the extremity of said line running next to the North and South line of Cranberry District altogether nearly 3000 acres. There has no coal been found on any other part of the Harewood property. It would be far better I think to give 2000 pounds for 3000 acres in the locality indicated than 5000 pounds for the whole Estate. Mr. Bell will probably have something to tell you relative to his peep at Harewood.

The break at the swamp has been a most vexatious affair- the more so because the plan of the mine was far in arrears, and we would seem to have been groping in the dark. We had Landale for some two weeks before Mr. Bell's arrival, making a new plan etc but it was incomplete when wanted. I fear Mr. Bell would form a poor opinion of our surveys etc. mainly because the works were not systematically laid on paper. He did not hesitate to tell me, after he had looked into things a little, that we wanted a man to attend to the surveying etc. He was quick to perceive our wants in every direction and [appears?] thoroughly well posted in all branches of Coal mining. My earnest hopes are that his visit here, although a short one, will be beneficial to the Company in some way.

I shall hear very soon if we can do anything with the Union Co. Comox. I have seen nothing in the country to equal the outcrops on their claim. Baynes Sound is a better place for shipping, I think then Port Augusta into which the Union Co. Railway will run.

It is generally supposed that Coal under Gabriola Island would be [-----]

(Page 21) deep. One or two holes were put down on the Northern end of the island 12 years ago, but no satisfactory indications were found. About 2000 acres are occupied by settlers, and at present I fear we could not get any privilege to explore from the Government. After the 21st of next month, coal lands will be for sale according to the "Mineral Ordinance Amendment Act".

Lieutenant Egerton. who was out here in HMS. Boxer. has taken an interest in Diggle’s mine, and it is he, so Spalding tells me, who has found [cash?] to buy Rails and a locomotive for the Road from the mine to Departure Bay. Locomotive and rails are expected about October. [Richert?], who takes the Wellington coal for the San Francisco market, has lately proposed to make a new contract with Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co on terms which will just suit them at the present time. He is to pay so much per ton for the coal as it is delivered to the heap near the wharf, and is to take it away as he wants it. The notion is suppose to keep a stock at the mine to run at instead of carrying it to San Francisco and putting it in a yard in storage. Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co will have the best of a bargain of [?]

I am sorry to say I still feel the effect about my chest of the cold from which I suffered so long. I shall soon be quite well I trust.

Mr. Bermingham, when here the other day, appeared very anxious about getting more coal. I inferred from the way he spoke, that they have a prospect of making larger sales for us. High freights tell heavily on our business.

With best wishes, I beg to remain

Very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 22)

11 June 73

Nicholas J. Jones Esq.
Savannah, Georgia
 

My Dear Sir,

I just drop you a line to say that an offer has been made to me of $1000 cash for your property on the Esplanade. Of course, it is for you to consider whether the sum named is better than $7.00 a month with repairs, Taxes etc. to be paid out of that. I promised to lay the offer before you at the earliest moment and to request a reply by return.

I am getting the House you lived in painted, whitewashed etc. and will send you an account of the expenditures as soon as the work is finished. Fiddick’s residence also requires rather extensive repairs. Rents for some will be absorbed in paying for the fixing up of the houses.

Hoping you are well, and with kind regards.

I remain

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 23)

1st July 73

Dear Mr. Wild

I have much pleasure in writing to acknowledge the receipt of your kind letter of 31st May and I thank you for your goodness in attending to the purchase of shares for me in the company's stock. I am sorry to give you trouble in the matter, for I feel sure your time must be pretty well occupied about more important business. I hardly supposed the shares would be so difficult to obtain. The fact of few being on the market, and those at a high figure is evidence that stockholders think well of their property. The transfer of two shares I enclose and beg again to return thanks to your great kindness.

Our old pit is yet in a bad state. It vexes me to see such a long list of persons engaged for our small turnout of coal. The deepening of B slope which was going on rapidly has been abruptly stopped by water getting in from the lodgment. If we could get down here to run another level we should have some prospect of raising more coal. We never ought to be dependent upon one level if we could get two. During the strike, it was decided, after much deliberation, to immediately set on to deepen B slope when work was resumed and the road was relaid in readiness for the job. My colleagues thought, however, soon after the miners came to terms, that the pitch level would take (Page 24) coal we proposed to raise by B slopes. I argued and endeavored to show that we could get the slope down and the coal to the rise of the pitch lifted long before we could expect [overwritten] under the most favourable circumstances to get near any part of it from the pitch, but nothing was done towards deepening the slope and a long time elapsed before the bottom of the pitch was got at, and we see where we are today. The clearing of lower level is a slow process. The second incline (from C slope) into which the No 1 level was lately penetrated cannot be approached by the lower level as the mud is not removed to that point and we have much farther to go before another incline of stall from which coal can be mined is opened out. In the meantime, all the force we can employ to advantage is kept at the [----?], but the road being blocked with it headway is very slowly made.

I have no doubt that from all sources we shall make a good showing for the half year ending December. There is nothing in the way of turning out coal at Fitzwilliam Mine if things are kept in order, and you will be glad to know that the Newcastle Coal is looking much cleaner. The Chase River Coal part of Douglas shaft has been improving. [overwritten] The miners needed a change of some kind from the appearance of the heading today. I hope something of greater value may be struck. I think we should do well to get a bore down and ascertain if anything workable is to be found under the Newcastle seam. We have never examined the [?] I refer to.

Things seem to be moving along lately at the Wellington mine. I am told they are getting to their wharf daily 65 tons and for all they ship to San Francisco they are paid into the bank in Victoria. I hear 5.50 per ton. Then the heavy supply for which cash is paid on delivery. [blurring] They have entirely to themselves. In this connection, I am reminded that some time ago, in one of the Head Offices Dispatches, allusion was made to a Rear Admiral, a shareholder of this Company, who enquired if we could not furnish ships with fresh water at the wharf here. I should like to see the Admiral on this station. We might then have 'fair play' in the Navy department. The contract for providing coal to war vessels expires next February I believe, but I expect if Admiral Ferguson and other Naval officers retain their interest in the Wellington Mine that coal will be used exclusively in future as at present.

I shall write to you again if anything turns up shortly. There is nothing I would like to hear of and With best wishes I remain

Yours most truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 25)

18 July 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

We gave the 'Saranac' 58 tons of new clean coal yesterday. Capt. [?] objected to come alongside the wharf, so we delivered the coal to the vessel out in the harbour. They did not get through with coaling until last evening, and none of them came ashore to settle or give me a receipt. Perhaps the steamer will call on her way back from Sitka - if not I will send a Bill down for collection.

I am very sorry to tell you that Alport left here clandestinely last week enticing and taking away with him our darling Emily. They were married, I believe, on arrival at Victoria (Page 26) and left almost immediately for England. Mrs. Bate has been very ill for some days and I myself am much dispirited and almost unnerved. You know we have thought so much of Emily, and taken such care of her, as we supposed, that to lose her in so disgraceful a manner -- to have her taken off thousands of miles, perhaps never to see her again, without even a goodbye -- has caused grief of more poignancy than I can attempt to describe. After a short stay in England, it is said Alport will go to South Africa.

Workers are going on steady, and I think that next ship or two we get will be quickly loaded.

With kindest regards in which Mrs. Bate joins.

Believe me

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 27)

30th July 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have to thank you for your kind favour of the 21st inst.

We have not been sinking the slope at Fitzwilliam Mine since you were here. We have thought it advisable, now that we have so much coal already now to open it out to, to push our levels and make room for stalls. This we are doing as steadily as possible, and of course, expect to reap the benefit in our enlarged output.

I alluded to Alport's disgraceful departure in my last note to you. The mean fellow wanted to marry Emily long ago, and on speaking to me

on the subject I told him I could not consent to her marriage till she attained her 18th year. I, moreover, only two weeks or so before he left, told him that if he concluded to go to South Africa, Emily should meet him in England in two years time if they desired to do so. He told me he should be in no hurry to leave and would consider whether he should go or not, but he never after said a word to me about leaving or about Emily. He [though?], I have since ascertained, instead of being in no hurry, began at once to prepare for clearing out. He grossly deceived me, and I will punish him for the sorrow he has inflicted on our family. He shall not sail under false colours.

Bichard is doing quite a business with Dunsmuir & Co. He was stopping to take about 2000 tons next month. I am glad you give him the “privilege” of finding customers for himself.

I am sorry to say Mrs. Bate is far from well. She grieves deeply about Emily, is continually crying, and it [pains?] me that she does not get in better spirits.

Emily says Mrs. Bermingham was very kind to her at San Francisco. Naughty girl as she is, we much appreciate any little act of kindness towards her. The children miss her very much.

With best wishes, believe me

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 29)

31st July 73

Dear Sir

I shall be glad if you can come to Nanaimo by return of steamer or by canoe if it will not discommode you, to see if we can arrange for you to take the position in our office you personally applied for last week.

I am, Dear Sir

Yours very truly for the Company.

M. Bate

C. Loat Esq.

 

(Page 30)

18 Aug 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind note of the 4th inst. is to hand. Please accept our best thanks for your sympathy in the matter of Emily's sudden departure. So far as regards myself, I have pretty well got over the shock, but Mrs. Bate, I am sorry to say, shows plainly the effect the loss of Emily has had upon her. She pines dreadfully. Won’t have a thing Emily left behind disturbed etc.

[Bichard’s?] new ship - the [Remijio?] left for your port the other day with a load of Dunsmuir Coal, and the 'North Star' is about loaded also bound for your port. The Wellington got in on the 8th and it is her turn next. The [Remijio?], I am told, did not (Page 31) cost her owner $5,000! Bryden tells me (it's very seldom he lets out anything of Dunsmuir's affairs) that Bichard has written to Dunsmuir wanting to get coal cheaper, but that Dunsmuir won't hear of it. He says Bichard writes that we are selling 10,000 tons at [$11.40?] per ton and he (Bryden) wanted to know if this is so. I said "[?], Australian and English is selling at about $10.00 and the chances are it will soon be lower, and if Bichard gets about $9.00 for Wellington coal, at this time, he is doing well." I don't intend for Dunsmuir to know what we are doing anyway. We have played enough into his hands!

We are in a fix for Rails for the wharf - the high one - and the road to it, so that we shall have to manage with the low one at Fitzwilliam mine till we get a supply shortly expected from London. In loading the 'Shooting Star'. we had, in my opinion, a sad mess. The chutes not being finished caused a great deal of trouble to get the coal into the cars. I hope we shall get things in order by and bye.

With best wishes, Your very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 32)

15 Aug 73

My Dear Mother

I wrote to you in May last, also in April. In the one letter, I sent you half a sovereign and in the other I enclosed a Bill of Exchange for 5 Pounds which I hope reached you in due course. I shall send herewith half a sovereign, and very shortly will submit to you a larger amount.

In the note I got from D. [Bartham?] last week, he tells me you were not

very well. I need scarcely say, my dear Mother, that to hear that you are not in good health causes me to be uneasy and gives me pain. I am praying for the pleasure of seeing you again in the flesh. There is nothing in this world that I desire so much as to have you taken care of, that you might be spared for me to embrace you once more. God protect and preserve my dear Mother.

We are all pretty well I'm pleased to say. Lucy was to write to you last week and I hope she did so. She said she would send you half a sovereign.

Our little ones are frequently inquiring when we are going to take them to England to see their Grandma, and sometimes comfortable and prosperous as my position here is, I feel like preparing to go Home, if only just for the trip. Were it not for our large family, (Page 33) I do not think I should hesitate long to make a start. We could reach London in less than a month from the time of leaving Nanaimo, but I cannot make ready to make departure from this place yet a while.

Elizabeth and her husband and all their children were well when I heard from them about a week ago, and I am pleased to state they are prospering - doing better than for some time past. Their oldest boy, Adam Henry, has been staying with us for a week or two during the School Holidays, and our boys, of course, were glad of his company.

I shall be writing again very soon, and I hope it will not be long before I hear that your health has improved.

Give my Kind love to my Uncles, Aunts and cousins, and to all inquiring friends, and accept for yourself and Father-in-law the never failing love of Sara Anne and your Affectionate Son

M. Bate

(Page 34)

24 Aug 73

My dear Mr. [Wild?]

I beg to thank you for your kind favour of the 19th July.

I can well understand Mr. Robin's anxiety to have an early interview with Mr. Bell and I can readily believe that he would let nothing stand in the way of their getting together - so very zealous is he in looking to the company's prosperity - Mr. Bell, perhaps, with regard to the Wellington coal being found on the Harewood Estate, and some other similar matters, might have come to a conclusion somewhat hastily but there can be no doubt, I think, about his being able to give much good advice with reference to our works generally. I don't mean to offer an opinion against him on mining matters. I may be allowed to remark, however, that judging from what he let drop once or twice while here, he might rather undervalue the old Douglas Pit, although on his last look down the pit he said he was more favourably impressed than on his first inspection. It is my firm belief that Douglas Pit has yet to “see much better days.”

I shall be pleased to get the 18 Shares just when you consider it is the proper time to buy. Desirous as I am to hold 20 shares at least, it would not be wise, I think, for me to urge a purchase at a high premium.

Harewood has the advantage to our Company, over other [?] Coal land

(Page 35) that it borders our present Estate, but the Coal of Harewood might be of less value than is apparent, and it might be otherwise, for the seam exposed has not been well examined i.e. worked into. Three or four years ago, if I recollect rightly, you mentioned that the Harewood Estate was offered for 2,500 Pounds!

I was not sorry to learn of the failure of Mr. J. D. Pemberton’s scheme re Baynes Sound. Before long, I apprehend, one or the other of the Comox Coal claims will be actually worked. The “Union” claim as far as can be seen on the surface, is certainly a valuable property, and when once the road is laid with rails and the necessary rolling stock obtained, it will be an easy job to dig coal from the seams at the Outcrop, and a large area can be worked level free. The Union directors say they will not accept less then $55,000 for the whole claim. Several [1/11?] interests- I imagine can be bought at $3,000.00. There has not been more than $10,000.00 expended on the property altogether.

I never lose an opportunity to prevail on Mr. Bryden to get on with the filling in at the swamp. The men at the drain have a great work before them, and it seems a mistake that the job was not commenced at an earlier date. The only thing to do now is to hurry the men on and get the cutting through before the end of October.

There is great excitement among us just now about the discovery of whole mountains, the reports say, of iron ore on Texada Island near Comox. Some of the government officials are staking off claims, and a day or two ago, the Lieut. Governor and four or five other gentlemen went to the Island on H.M.S. ['Myrmidon'?].

Our Wellington friends are certainly getting along first rate. They have a knack of taking away from our Establishment, as they (Page 36) want them, our best men- whether miners, [Enginemen?] or Roadmen, and, what seems very strange to me, the persons whom my colleagues crack up as smart useful hands are the ones to go. Egerton seems to act in the capacity of general traveling agent. His last move, I hear, is to get the American war vessels coaled at Esquimalt.

(Page36)

The U.S.S. 'Shubrick' was coaled at that port by [HBC?] ships the other day because there was no coal in Victoria. Hitherto, the Yankees have come to us, but by [facing?] the engineers etc. Egerton might win them over. Nearly 80 tons a day it is said are coming out of the Wellington Mine, and, going to the wharf daily, and for all of their coal, Dunsmuir Diggle etc. are getting $5.50 per ton. I mentioned this in a note to Mr. Bermingham, in acknowledgment of which he says "Dunsmuir telegraphed Bichard some time since he was offered 5.50 for all his coal for this market and if B. wanted it at that price he could take it. Bichard told me the other day that after showing me the dispatch that as he had some old vessels that would be difficult to find employment for elsewhere, he had no course but to accept of Dunsmuir’s offer, but he now regrets it very much as he can't dispose of the coal at previous [?] prices and is obliged to store more [?] of his receipts.

You can easily imagine what can be done with Wellington coal here when English is selling at about [?] by the [?] 300 tons [?] for that [?] this very day. Still, the fact remains the Wellington people are getting 5.50 per ton for their coal. You will doubtless take the opportunity of talking over with Mr. Rosenfeld the question of price of coal as well as rate of freight. The latter probably is the easiest to remedy.

You would perceive by my last note to you that I advocate the examination by bore of the metals underlying the Newcastle coal. I believe there are indications of a lower seam outside Newcastle Island. The Chase River coal [?] off Douglas Shaft has hardly been taken out. The fault or up throw as it appears should be proved at once. We are working, as I have stated in official letters, along parallel and close to the fault and in the [?] both ways there is good thick workable coal-so good and thick that a man is working by that told me of a narrow drift. It is more than possible that the jump upward may change the character of the coal altogether and I think you will agree with me that we cannot [?] to soon whether this is the case or not. Cooper praises the Chase River coal highly for the locomotives.

I am glad to be able to state that I now feel as strong [?] for work as ever, and hoping you are well and with kind regards

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild,

Yours very Sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 37) [overwritten and blurred]

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

1 Sept 73

I am extremely obliged for your kind note of the 19th inst.

It is singular that the idea which suggested itself to me was exactly the explanation Bichard gives respecting doing business with the Wellington Co.-that is- he wanted to find employment for his vessels, and although he pays a good price for his coal, I suppose he comes out right in the end. Were it not for the Navy and Bichard, Dunsmuir would not sell much coal just now. The Wellington Co have evidently got the best of the bargain with Bichard.

The Bark 'Wellington' has been at Departure Bay since the 8th ultimo and Capt Cathers does not expect to get away till the 3rd or 4th inst. It is not surprising to hear of English coal finding its way to your market with prices so high in England. The Australian coal, however, is the great sale of the coal business in San Francisco, I expect, and we shall have to stand off, I suppose, while it has the field.

I am certain Broderick vessels taking over time with another load about as quick at Fitzwilliam mine as they would from this side. I will tell you one thing: their order invariably asked for new seam coal, and it would seem they like to fight for the sake of the extra bit. [?] It is true we can load their schooner quicker here if we have no other vessel under the shute at the same time, but in the case of a large vessel being at the wharf, [they?] would only be entitled to the coal passing over the machine and then would have to give way if a steamer required fuel. They always have it to themselves at the new mine.

We took out from the bottom of the shaft last month of 'Chase River' coal 157 tons. It has been mixed with the Douglas Coal except for a few tons given for steamers use. I believe it is a good steam coal, and we have it at the back of the heading 14 ft thick, but I am afraid from the latest appearance of the coal it will not hold out so thick and clean.

I am very glad to hear Mr. Rosenfeld had a pleasant trip to England and that he enjoyed good health and spirits. He will finally visit London. The Directors of our Co will be so pleased to see him particularly Mr. Wild whom you will recollect and who is now returned from Cape Town.

Hoping yourself and family are well, and with best wishes and kind regards in which Mrs. Bate joins.

I am

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 39)

4 Sept 73

J. Jones Esq.
Savannah, Georgia
 

My dear Sir

I am in receipt of your letter informing me that you are not disposed to sell your property on the Esplanade for One thousand dollars ($1,000.) and I have notified the intending purchaser - Capt. Spalding, our Magistrate of your decision.

Enclosed I send you statement of account and vouchers by the former [.?] You will perceive I have in hand $44.50, but I have yet to get Fiddick’s house whitewashed and some repairs are wanted inside the building. It will not take much to do what is necessary.

On Page's Bill, you will notice he alluded to a small house close to the office-meaning Fiddick's. Since Mr. Nicol left, I have been living in the Boarding House, as it was called, and we have the office in one end of the building.

Nanaimo is beginning to show signs of improvement in various new directions. If you make up your mind to come here, I have no doubt you will find an opening in some business that may be agreeable to you.

A great many of the old faces are still among us and some I am glad to say are prospering.

Accept the kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and myself for yourself and Mrs. Jones and believe me I remain

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 40)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

18 Sept 73

I have your kind favour of the 5th instant for which I am much obliged. With regard to Bichard’s arrangement with Dunsmuir, it would seem the former is already bound to take the Coal for another year. If he has made a bad bargain, he has himself only to blame. Would it be worth while your trying to do any business with Bichard by and by in order to frustrate the Wellington people? We have only this week resumed operations at the foot of Fitzwilliam Slope and it will probably take some time to get through to the coal, but, of course, this will mainly depend upon the extent of the [want?]. There are no breaks or dislocations in the seams as far as we have proved it. The character of the 'cup' we have is quite common in coalfields. It is simply the coal washed away apparently by some (Page 41) sudden rush of water during the formation of the seam, and for aught any one can say. we may have the coal close at hand and it might be otherwise.

The clearance of mud is still going on, but we are not making headway so rapidly as I could wish. There is only room for two or three men to work at the job together. Dunsmuir talks of buying a lot of the Seattle Coal Co plant, which it is said is for sale. There are conflicting accounts about the Wellington mine, but the prevailing opinions of the workmen is that the coal does not go under the ridges ahead and on either side of the slope . If such is the case, a few years will exhaust the present mine. They are taking out. I believe. 70 to 80 tons a day.

I am much pleased to hear Mr. Rosenfeld will have a good stay in London. The secretary informs me the Directors have not yet fully digested the opinions of Mr. Bell and Mr. [Hayward?] upon the future working of the mines, but that I shall soon be put in possession of their wishes.

Many thanks for your goodness in sending me a box of grapes and watermelons - the former I received in good order but the latter did not come to hand at all.

Could you kindly obtain and send by one of the ships 'Garrets’ illustrated and descriptive price List of Gauge Cocks, Oil cups etc. etc. It would be very useful to me. I shall look for the 'Panther' back. When is the 'Arkwright' due here? If you can send the 'Camden' back to the new mine, it will do a good job.

With best wishes of Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain

Very sincerely yours.

M. Bate

(Page 42)

Private

2nd Oct 73

My Dear Mr. Wild

Your kind letter of 20th and 26th August I received in Victoria in the 27th ultimo, and I was pleased rather than otherwise to note by the latter that the Board evinced some little interest in the marriage of Mr. Alport and my daughter. That you may understand why I used the word 'clandestine' and why I wrote somewhat harshly of Mr. Alport, I will explain at length how grossly he deceived me. About a month or five weeks before Alport's departure, he submitted to me a letter he had received from an Uncle in which a proposal was made to him to go to South Africa. He spoke of his Uncle's wealth, and thought a chance was open for him, which might never recur again. After some further talk. he asked my consent to his betrothal to my daughter so that he might take her with him if he went. I declined to give consent, solely on account of the girl's youth, and told him that neither Emily's Mamma nor myself were willing to part with her yet awhile. He asked that I should keep his Uncle's letter a few days, show it to Mrs. Bate, and he hoped I would change my mind. On giving him the letter a week or so afterward, he enquired if we had thought anything more about our previous conversation concerning my daughter. I told him again we could not think of parting with the girl for a year or two. He replied he was afraid his Uncle would not keep the offer open, and he did not know how to act. I told him I should

(Page 43) be very sorry to lose him, but if he thought as he said, the position he would get from his Uncle would be so much better than anything he could ever expect to attain out here, it might be well for him to go. If he did go, I said that Mrs. Bate and myself would have no objection, if they were so much attached to each other, to Emily following him in charge of some reputable family and meeting him in England, say, in two years hence. Alport, seeming pleased, said, "You pledge yourself to that?" I again told him if it was Emily's wish to meet him or go to him, she should do so when of age. Alport then said he had not “written to his Uncle yet and would think over what he would do". He never afterwards said a word to me, either about leaving his place here, or with respect to my daughter but at once, as I have since learned, began to prepare, aided by his brother Arthur, to get my child away and leave clandestinely, knowing that he was taking the girl to South Africa, so at all events believing that was his intention, you can imagine what pain his conduct caused myself and Mrs. Bate - how deeply it would hurt us to be so shamefully bereft of a child. I myself soon got over the loss, but Mrs. Bate was in hysterics for nearly three weeks. Alport was telegraphed to at San Francisco and informed of the state of his mother-in-law's health – and was begged to come back but he appears to have got away as quickly as steamer could carry him. You will I know, from the unbounded confidence I had in Mr. Alport, that I could never have looked for such perfidy from him. Had I anticipated his intentions, I would not allowed an elopement to take place. The business should have been done honorably, but by a private note left behind unintentionally, I see how Alport pressed the child and got her to commit herself, as he no doubt easily could do from his greater age and experience. For nearly four years till she was 15 1/2 years old…

(Page 44) Emily has been away from home at Queens College, Victoria, and you will think it natural for me to desire a year or two of our dear Child's company for our own comfort as well as for the good of her younger Brothers and sisters. She has gone, however, and I have not the least doubt that her husband, who, apart from this one rash and dishonorable act, has always been a upright and worthy man, will properly appreciate the sacrifice she made in leaving her parents to cast her lot with him. So young did Emily appear, that the first clergyman they presented themselves to in Victoria refused to marry them on account of her tender age. The second one they called upon was not so considerate. On arrival in England, Emily wrote a long letter, and also a letter written in San Francisco, and on receipt of yours in Victoria I telegraphed to Alport in England to come back to Nanaimo. And that I would welcome him.

(Page 45)

I did not get an answer before leaving Victoria, and it is probable that he, too, left for the Cape ere my message reached England. Indeed, it was evident that when Alport sailed from here he was fully bent on going to Cape Colony. And it was that, as much as anything, that prolonged Mrs. Bate's illness. Had he brought Emily here to us, if only to say ‘goodbye’, we might soon have forgiven his rashness and sent him on his way rejoicing. But he will spare us pains, I'm sure, to promote his wife's happiness, and we cannot do otherwise than wish them much joy and prosperity, wherever they may go.

Please accept my thanks for the Certificates of two shares in the Company Stock. I must wait for the balance until they are available on lower terms.

If Mr. Bell had seen the Newcastle seam as I saw it at Nanaimo River the (Page 44) other day, I think he would modify his opinion of that coal as a whole, or at least, before denouncing it, take a little more time to consider the ground upon which his impression was given. The fact is we do not push on the exploration of the Newcastle seam as we ought or might, nor can I get Mr. Bryden to move things any faster. At the rate we are going on, we shall have the Wellington people shipping as much coal as we do before long. The last two yards of the Newcastle slope, the workmen reported the coal better than any had passed through and Sage only asked for the New Winch to enable him to get on with the sinking. He has always had the small winch we took from the ['Fedelite'?]. I am afraid Mr. Bell will, unfortunately, be all wrong in his idea of lower seams existing under the Newcastle. I was inclined that way until two weeks ago but I am now [only?] (Page 45) realize the Wellington, Newcastle and Chase River Coals are identical as to seams. I recommend a Bore on the opposite side of the Bay to the Newcastle where there is a good coal field for working and, in case we are successful with a bore, we might make use of that splendid bit of footage where Harewood water is deep close inshore? Whoever gets hold of Harewood is almost sure to want the spot I refer to for Wharf and Shipping purposes.

In my official letter yesterday, I alluded to a conversation I had with Mr. Bichard on the way to Victoria. I [----] to [------] he told me he had a trial made of Wellington coal for gas and it was found "no good for gas" Mr. Rosenfeld wrote at the time, well after the trial of Wellington Coal for the same purposes, that it was equal to our Douglas.

Alport's departure, as you suppose, gave me a deal of extra work. All the stock book headings to be written up just as he left. I was at the desk nearly all day and night (not to mention) Sunday in July being determined that the official business should not suffer.

Mr. Loat, this gentleman I have with me most for clerk. He draws $100.00 a month. I have told him I should hear from the Board.

I should be greatly pleased if Alport retraces his steps [-------]. To have her darling daughter near her will add much to my wife's comfort.

With best wishes I remain dear Mr. Wild.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 46)

My Dear Mother

3rd. October 73

I was much pleased to receive your kind letter of the 25th of June informing me that you were better in health than when my dear Aunt Lucy wrote to me. How it cheered me to hear the good news you cannot tell. My first thought was to thank God, and to ask him to care for you in your declining years. Your letter reached Comox all right, and Elizabeth and her husband wish me to say how glad they are to hear from you. My intention was to buy a cottage for you, but I think instead I will continue to send you money to pay your rent and keep you comfortable where you are. Do you owe anybody anything? I mean are you in arrears with your rent or anything else? Please let me know. Lucy has written to you at last I believe. I see her two or three times a week and she is quite well. Her husband also is in good health. I send enclosed a portrait of Sarah Anne. It was taken last week. I also send one of our little boy William and will forward some more in my next letter. We made a trip to Victoria last week and spent two or three days there. We had Aunt [Marie?] with us most of the time and enjoyed ourselves fully, riding around the city. I got the letter from John Mark but not the one you say William Bate sent me.

You misunderstood me dear Mother when I wrote about a Photo of myself. I wanted one taken long before the 'Carter' you returned to me. Have you the one I left at home which I had taken at Birmingham? I think that was on glass.

All of us are well at this time. I am glad to say. I am getting quite stout and Sarah Anne you will see by her photograph is not very thin. Mark is growing very fast in fact and all the children are healthy and strong.

You will be surprised to hear that Emily is married and gone to South Africa. We didn't wish her to get married so soon. Her husband is a noble fellow, a steady and worthy man and had very wealthy friends where they have gone to. He has been clerk in our office for some years so that I can bear testimony to his good character. His name is Charles Augustus Alport, and his parents reside at Kent, England.

I send enclosed 5 pounds which I trust will be applied to the best advantage - in keeping you comfortable. Please give our kind love to Uncles, Aunts and cousins and accept the same for yourself and father-in-law,

from Your loving son

Mark

(Page 48)

Nanaimo Vancouver Island

4 Oct 1873

My dear David

I have postponed our acknowledgment of your three welcome letters of the 21st Jan'y and 5th June for some weeks because I wanted to send a photo of my darling Sally. We have been away from home making a trip to Victoria the Capital of the province, which is about 80 miles from here, and while at Victoria we got two or three photographs of Mama and three of the children. I send you two, and will let you have more when I next write, which (Page 49) will be in the course of, say, a month when I will also drop a few lines to my good old friend D. Pearce.

The 'Colliery Guardian' and 'Mining Annual' come to hand with every Mail, and I thank you most sincerely for your thoughtfulness and great kindness in transmitting these papers to me. They are invaluable out here, are just the Journals I want, and, I hardly know how I could now do without them. It must be no small job to you packing up such a bundle of papers weekly. Your goodness, my dear David, is fully appreciated and you are thanked often without knowing it.

Enclosed I send you 1st of exchange for 5 pounds to pay for the Books papers etc. you obtain for me. There is published at the Colliery Guardian office I saw "The Colliery Manager Pocket Book". It comes out yearly. I shall be very thankful if you will procure it and send it to me.

All our family are well I am glad to state. Emily is married. I did not wish her to marry so young, and would have been better pleased if she had waited two or three years longer. Her husband however is a fine clever fellow in

every sense of the word, and I am sure will make of the best of husbands. I have had him in our office for some years, and know him to be most worthy young man. They have both gone to South Africa where Alport i.e. Emily's husband has an uncle- a wealthy old chap who sent for them. Emily you will now understand is Mrs. Alport. I must say (being only 36 years old) I don't like the prospect of being a Grandfather so soon. Sarah Anne and myself frequently have a laugh about this part of the business.

Ask your dear father and mother, all Uncles, Aunts, and cousins, not forgetting dear Grandmother to accept our kindest love, and please tell my dear Mother I wrote to her yesterday August 1st sending her a portrait of Sarah Anne which I know she will be glad to have. Sarah Anne will send a photo to any of her old friends who may desire one.

Accept yourself, dear David, our kindest love and hoping you are well.

Believe me to remember

your affectionate cousin

M. Bate

 

(Page 50)

8 Oct 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I made a trip to Victoria just after penning my last note to you and arrived in time to see the 'Prince Alfred' depart. I only had an opportunity to shake hands with the Capt. and Purser before the steamer moved off. Your kind favour of the 20th crossed me going up on the 'Emma', as I was on the way down, Broderick's people spoke to me about the freighting of coal from Newcastle Island and I reiterated what I had written to you. I understand they would carry from the Island at a reduced price. I told them we would do everything possible to accommodate their vessels and hope you will succeed in bringing them to terms. Broderick was all right during my stay in Victoria - was very active, and seemed attentive to his business. For his own good, he should keep straight.

If you write to Mr. Bell kindly remember me and Mrs. Bate to him!

We got a long letter from Emily from England, and while in Victoria, Mrs. Bate prevailed on me to telegraph to them to come back to Nanaimo. I sent a cable message accordingly, but I am afraid they were off for Africa before the telegram would reach Herne Bay.

I have great hopes of getting a (Page 51) good working seam at the bottom of the shaft. If it only keeps as we at present have it, we shall have a glorious thing. I am almost afraid it’s too good to last. We got over 200 tons as the produce last month, from narrow headings, of five men.

The clearing away of mud from the level is slow and tedious work. We are digging in as fast as possible, but are yet at some distance from the Break.

I did not hear of 'Austin' getting aground at the Island last trip. There was no need for mooring ship at the wharf, nor do I think they do so. The shutes were moved along the wharf to avoid hauling. I know 'Austin' would rather load at Nanaimo. They all do, some of them because they are near town.

By the papers, I was pleased to see that the ['Costa Rica'?] is not so much damaged as anticipated. I hope she will be speedily repaired and at little cost. I had a little chat with Mr. N[icholas] Bichard on the way to Victoria. Among other things, he told me Dunsmuir coal was no good for gas. I answered that was so! He has now two vessels at Departure Bay. He is, in fact, talking about all the Wellington coal. The 'Douglas' is coming to us for coal for the government - lighthouses, offices & etc. They say they prefer our Douglas to the Wellington.

Mr. Phelan, it seems, was after the Baynes Sound Mine, not the Wellington as maintained in your note. He went to Comox in the 'Emma' with a decided intention to invest it was said. On his return, I was told he had determined to keep his money. He did not stop at our mines. They steamed slowly past Newcastle and into the harbour after lying some hours at the Wellington wharf. Excuse this horribly written note and believe me.

Yours Very Sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 52)

Nanaimo

9 Oct 1873

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

Will you have the goodness to inform me by first opportunity what is the amount claimed on the note against Mr. C.N. Chantrell upon which payment is now pending?

If there is a probability of judgment being given before I can hear from you? Please pay the amount of the claim, say $300, which I think is somewhere near it, and I will refund the sum you pay to you?

Your Mr. Jackson underestimated the case, and as you have hitherto acted as Mr. Chantrell’s' legal adviser perhaps you will readily see that, in his absence, his interests are not neglected. Mr. Chantrell, as you are probably aware, has a valuable property here upon which I have a Mortgage - the amount of my loan, however, $400 and interest is only a small portion of the value of the Chantrell land.

By giving this matter your best attention, you will oblige

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 53)

Nanaimo

10 Oct. 1873

Private

Gentlemen

I addressed you yesterday requesting you to pay the amount of Rodell's claim against C.N. Chantrell, and I beg now to request that you will not let it be known that I agree to reimburse to you the sum due on the note for which judgment is asked.

The note, I understand, was discounted - obtained for a very few dollars, and I am told the original holder was paid something on account, but I do not know if this latter statement is true. At any rate I believe on Mr. Chantrell’s return from the upper country, it will be found that a legal action could be taken on the matter.

Of course you will let it be understood that you are acting for Mr. Chantrell. I do not wish at present to figure in the matter.

I am, gentlemen,

Yours very truly

M. Bate

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

 

(Page 54)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

21 Oct 3

I have your kind note of the 4th instant for which I am much obliged. Phelan, I understand, did not like any of the Comox Coal claims, and as regards Baynes Sound, it is rumoured that he stated in Victoria that the estimate for building wharf, making road etc. is at least 50% too low. I presume it is the estimate of Trutch, [Paston?] Co that is meant.

For steam or gas purposes, I suppose there will be no need for screening coal? but for house use, I expect the clean coal is always preferred, though it may be rather dearer than the unscreened.

When in Victoria, I told Broderick etc. that we would accommodate them in every possible way when their vessels go to Newcastle. Their talk about [--?] going to the island etc is all moonshine. I tell the Captain of the 'Emma' or 'B Diamond' to call on us at any hour and, (Page 55) and it is hardly one time in a dozen that the vessels arrive during working hours. They come in at midnight or early on the morning at one and we are at the wharf by 7 o'clock! This is invariably the case. When you write them again tell Broderick & Co, please, that I say we do everything in our power to oblige them, give shipping papers at all hours, and if they can only let me know and give some Signal when they are going to the new wharf there will be no need for the vessel to stay here specially to get an order. I should say moreover that 'Emma' or 'Diamond' generally have freight to discharge at the [----] wharf. so that you will see they do not always stop merely to “get an order”.

I was indeed glad to see that the 'Costa Rica' was saved and the account you kindly sent me of her resurrection I read with much interest. Many thanks for the box of grapes. It came to hand in fine order, also did Bryden’s.

We are keeping the 'Shooting Star' hatches blocked this trip. I don't think Austin has any hired men. In fact, I imagine he could not get any. Labour is very scarce. Could we get about 10 good Chinamen from your city – at $1.00 a day for 12 hours? We, of course, find houses for them.

The 'Prince' had a splendid run up last time- which I was pleased to notice- Victorian people, as far as I could learn, seem well pleased with their mail steamer now.

The big freight we are paying Pope and Talbot take the shine off our profits. The last cargo or two will not net above $4.40 to $4.43 per. This is rather a low figure compared with the $5.50 Dunsmuir, Diggle, etc. are receiving. When are we going to get some of the Popes [Blairs?] or any other ships at about $4.00? I should think those big vessels would do well at the one figure.

With kind wishes and best regards of Mrs. Bate

Believe me Dear Mr. Bermingham.

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate

How is Mr. Rosenfeld getting on? I hope himself and family are well.

 

(Page 56)

18th Oct.1873

Nanaimo

Mr. B. Mellado
Nanaimo
 

Sir

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th inst with the Plan and specifications of Nanaimo School House for which I thank you.

The balance due you on the school contract is in the hands of the secty and treasurer of the trustees Mr. L ([Feney?]). To whom be good enough to apply for the same.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

Chairman Nanaimo School Trustees.

29 Oct.1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I have yours of the 20th inst with enclosure, the contents of which I note with pleasure. Please do not let judgment issue upon Rodell's note under any circumstance. Before letting the matter come to this pass, kindly pay the claim, and as soon as I am advised I will send the amount to you.

Chantrell is looked for in Victoria very soon. In any event, you, of course, will know best what action to take in this case.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 57)

30 Oct, 1873

Nanaimo

Mr. John Hunter
Nanaimo
 

Sir

I hereby give you notice to quit and deliver up possession of the House and premises which you hold of me by the 30 November next - that is, one month from this date; and I have to request that you will in the meantime settle for the Rent now due me, namely $65.00. Should you fail to make a settlement, I shall be compelled to take steps for the recovery of the said $65.00 by process of Law.

M. Bate.

(Page 58)

3 Nov 3

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am favoured with your kind letter of the 18th inst. for which please accept my best thanks.

I have heard nothing at all lately of Mr. Phelans visit to Baynes Sound. I was told that on the return of the party to Victoria, Mr. [Gaston?] looked very much crestfallen, and no success was predicted in consequence. I am very glad to see that you are about to look after the President of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. Such Gentlemen are worth keeping note of, and I earnestly hope you will be able to make a good contract with him, and so, in a measure, recover something for the low freight the 'Shooting Star' is getting to [Guaymas?]. It will be pleasing to the Company if a demand comes (Page 59) to you from the Mexican Port.

Referring to the Chase River Coal - bottom of shaft - it does not seem to coke well. It burns very nicely, and from the few trials made of it, to be cleaner than either of the other coals. I sent you a few sacks by the 'Panther' that you may have it experimented with in any way you choose. I believe it will go well for steam. We raised last month of this coal 230 tons. At the back of our workings - 60 yards from the shaft we have a fault, an upheaval apparently, and we want to examine it “right away”, but it takes time to get away the coal which is unusually thick alongside the elevation. Perhaps we may find a “pouch” over the fault? though I hope not.

The sweet potatoes were duly received thank you. Our little ones smack their mouths at them and think them a great treat. I got no reply to my Cable dispatch. They were probably gone before it reached England. Our Secretary tells me Mr. Rosenfeld has been to the London Office and they had talked over matters etc. etc.

The 'Wellington', which vessel sailed from your port on the 11th ult, has not yet got to Departure Bay. Making a long trip, isn’t she? Accept best regards of Mrs. Bate and of [?]

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

P.S. A Bore is to be put down on the South end of Newcastle Island, [?] of [?] , to be followed by two others, East and West. [?] all goes well [down with the site of ?] [?] Directors.

 

(Page 60)

13 Nov. 1873

Nanaimo. Vancouver Island
British Columbia

Mr. David Pearce

My dear old friend.

I was exceedingly pleased to get the note you were kind enough to send

me through David Botham, though very sorry to learn by it you had just at the time you were writing, burnt your foot badly. I hope that no permanent injury followed the accident. And that long ere this time you are perfectly recovered.

There is nothing in the world I think that is so pleasing to ones mind as to hear of, or from, friends we knew in the distant past; and to get a picture of a familiar face, calls it may be, to recollection many (Page 61) pleasant reminiscences of earlier days. About 2 months ago, there arrived in this town an old Brierley Hill gentleman named Jeremiah Westwood who I think you know. He knows you very well, he says, and being a musical man himself, he is acquainted with nearly all the "Fiddlers" etc. around the neighborhood of Brierley Hill. I have had a long chat with him, and I assure you he gave me a very interesting account about many of my old associates, and of the changes the country has undergone in the 17 years since I left it. Time seems to have fled so fast that it hardly appears to me half seventeen years since I bid farewell to the shores of dear old England. (Page 61)

I am still in the music line - as fond of it as ever. We have a fine band here of 24 performers beside drums (4) and cymbals. I play a cornet that is in the band. I stick to the violin too, and a few of us spend two or three evenings a week playing to amuse ourselves.

Kindly remember me to James Grainger and Ephraim Westwood and to all other friends who may enquire about me. What has become of J. Bowman, the [Vangas?] and H. Collier? Where is George Fothergill and Charley [Kendwell?] who used to live at Moorland? When you write in acknowledgment of this, which I hope will be soon, please tell me how all the old friends are faring.

(Page 62) publications touching upon any branch of mining especially Coal mining.

We have, for some time, carefully looked in the Marriage notices in the Country Express in the expectation of seeing an announcement to the effect that you were united in the bonds of Matrimony. The, to you, all-important event does not seem to have come off yet. In case you should get a wife before this reaches you, we desire (in advance perhaps) to wish you much joy, happiness and prosperity.

I told you in my last letter that Emily is married. By this time, I suppose she is at Beaufort West, Cape Colony, South Africa. We have had communications from both her and her husband, written from England, and while en route, and they seem to be as happy as it is possible for them to be in this world. They have, I believe, a bright future before them. At all events, everything at present looks well for them.

I have not the least doubt that Emily's husband will speedily make his mark, for he is a person (Page 63) (Page 65) of most unflagging perseverance and energy. Nor is he wanting in that which is all essential – training and good education.

I forgot if I told you I received from my old friend Thomas Hughes a long, interesting letter, and I likewise heard from my Brother-in-law Mr. [Shassaly?] but, owing to a continual pressure of business, I have not been able to acknowledge either of their epistles. Please tender an apology for me to T. Hughes to whom I will write without fail in the course of the next fortnight. Also give my best respect to him. I address a newspaper to him occasionally which I hope reach his hands.

We are very glad to get some intelligence of all our old acquaintances at Home. That is, of those, who are still around you. Kindly remember us to John [Botham?] and his wife and to all others who may enquire about us. What has become of Uncle Samuel [Dovey?] It seems a long time since we heard anything of him. We are very sorry to hear that Uncle Aleck has not in all these years got rid (Page 64) ...of his drunken fits and [indeed?] it must be to have a home rendered miserable as all homes are by a father spending his hard earnings in a bar-room, or on drink -----that which neither does good to the recipient or family. Aunt Phoebe has our warmest sympathy, and earnest wishes for a reformation of her husband, if that is possible.

William is still farming, and I believe he does fairly well. His Mother complains that he does not write and we have told him so, urging him at the same time to drop a line or two in all directions his relatives are to be found. The last time we heard from him he said he was in the best of health. We have not had a letter from Sarah Anne's sister for about 4 months or more but we are daily expecting one in answer to a note of ours.

Our miners here are always in full work, and every man who comes around is sure of employment and is promptly given it. The government […..?] are about to assist immigration soon i.e. pay part of the passages of those workers to come to this (Page 64) country. I shall enclose in this letter an article on British Columbia published in one of the San Francisco journals. After perusal of it, be good enough to hand it to others to read. You might let T. Hughes and D. Pearce read it too.

I also send you herewith some more photos. That of Sarah Anne with Lizzie Ada (baby) on her knee is in the shade It was the baby’s picture we were anxious to get and therefore Mama placed herself in the background. The picture of the baby, however, is not at all a great likeness. In taking it, the face, which is an exceedingly pretty one, is moved, and one hand you will perceive is wholly thrown away and had it not been for Mama hold it, I say likely one of the legs could have taken flight also. The picture of Sally Anne is a perfect portrait. I do ask though, is it possible to get a more correct face in any picture? You will judge from her appearance probably that she is a bright, wide awake girl. There are two others George and Mary whose photographs we want to get, but we shall have to wait some time for them. [Original overwritten, sequence here is not clear]

(Page 64)

We are getting a large family around us here. We have five daughters and four boys. The oldest girl Emily is married and is likely to do extremely well. Her husband has wealthy connections; but apart from his riches he is a first rate young fellow as I well know by having him in the office with me for eight years. My wife 'Sallie',as I call her. drew my attention a few weeks ago to my announcement of your eloped daughter's marriage. And at least she supposed from the names it was your daughter. Is she right? I am glad to say we are all well and I sincerely hope all your family is in the enjoyment of good health. -the greatest of all earthly blessings. Accept for yourself and Mrs. Pearce the united regards of myself and Mrs. Bate.

 

(Page 63)

13 Nov

My Dear David

When writing to you on the 4th ultimo, I promised to write again in the course of a month, and I now propose to return my pledge. The Mining Journal, Colliery Guardian and the Country Express Newspaper continue to come to hand regularly.

I also received the work in Mineralogy and Hopton’s [Converter?] on [-?]. The latter volume contains a great deal of useful information and is very valuable. Again, accept my hearty thanks for your great kindness and attention in transacting to me the interesting reading matter you do. You hardly know how much one prizes [it?] in this remote corner of the Globe…[-]…(Page 63)

shall probably have to wait [till some time?] for them.

Mark and Tommy whose photos, I believe I sent you some few years ago, are growing up fine. The former, nearly fourteen years old, is a very robust chap, and the head pupil in his school. He got the first prize for the last examination and bids fair to come [in at the ?].

He desires to be most affectionately remembered to my dear Mother, to all Uncles, Aunts and Friends. And he particularly requests our best love will be accepted by you, dear father and mother. Sarah Anne often repeats some of the sayings of both of them. She likely recollects more of your fathers and mothers owing to living near them so long, than she does of other uncles and aunts.

Convey our never failing love to our dear old friends and we beg you will receive the same.

With best wishes I remain my dear David

your affectionate cousin

M. Bate

 

(Page 66)

20 Nov 3

I was very sorry to hear by your kind note of the 5th inst. that you had fallen down the hold of the 'Prince Alfred', and I earnestly hope you have received no permanent injury, and that ere now you have got over the effects of the fall entirely. Are you not working too hard? Five days and nights without proper rest is a terrible strain on the best constitution of man.

It will be three months at least before the large wharf at the island will be in readiness for shipping. The extension will be rather a big job, but the contractor I am sure will hurry on with all his might. Every pile we put in will be

(Page 67) sheathed with [?] metal in order to make the structure permanently strong. The depth of water when the wharf is carried out its full breadth will not be less than 2 feet alongside at the lowest spring tide. The Piles for the work are of unusual length. I am anxiously looking for the 'Arkwright' while we have fine weather. In a very short time. I expect we shall get plenty of snow.

Will you please do me a favour of having the enclosed photographs of myself and Mrs. Bate enlarged to the same size as one of Emily's we have framed. I believe the artist Mr. [?] has one of Emily so that he will see the kind we want. We do not wish frames, however, as we intend to send the pictures away. They will only need to be mounted on card. When sending the photos, kindly send the bill and I will [?] it.

We have long letters again from Alport and Emily. They were on the eve of leaving for the Cape, and were quite well and apparently in good spirits. Emily says [is?] disappointed in not getting photos, which were (after Page 67)

to have been sent after them. If you know the establishment at which their photographs were taken, I should feel extremely obliged if you would procure for us half a dozen of each - Alport and Emily.

Trusting that I'm not taking too much of your time, and hoping shortly to hear that you are well.

I am with best wishes

Yours most sincerely

M. Bate

P.S. I send two photos of Mrs. Bate. The artist can use those from which he can make the best job. Ward writes to me - that the customer for Baynes Sound has not come to time yet, but he seems intent to going in for coal and as he has lots of money, it is believed he will buy. I suppose Phelan is the customer he alludes to.

M.B.

(Page 68)

Nanaimo

6 Nov 1873

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I beg to enclose for your perusal and consideration copy of a letter I have received from Messrs Robertson & Johnson and copy of my reply.

I am sorry judgment was obtained on Chantrell's note held by Rodello. However, I suppose I have still the power to sell the property- mortgaged to me say at public auction. Please advise me by return of the 'Douglas' if I can do so, and if there is any other course you would advise me to take in the interest of Chantrell as well as myself.

I would rather, if it is safe, keep the matter in abeyance until Chantrell or his friends in England are heard from.

I am gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 69)

28th November 73

My Dear Mother

We have been expecting to hear from you, in answer to our last letter, for some time, and as we have something to send you we won't wait any longer for a letter to reply to. Papers come to us from you nearly every week for which please accept our thanks. About 2 months ago, we made a trip to Victoria - took 3 of the children with me, and got some good portraits of all of us. It is these pictures that I want to send you. More of my darling Sally. I know you will be especially pleased to get. They are correct likenesses, the best I think we have ever had taken in this country. Those of William and little Sallie are particularly good, but the one of [Marie?] and Lizzie, is only third rate. Sarah Anne was anxious to get a nice picture of the little one and so placed herself in the background. Lizzie, however, would not sit still. She moved her face, and does not look half so pretty as she is. She also threw her arms about, and one you will see is clean gone, and it is very likely one of the legs would have taken flight had not Mamma held it.

So much for the pictures, and now I will tell you what will (Page 70) probably be the best news I have to convey: it is that we are all well. The children are growing up amazingly. Mark is a fine, strong, robust looking chap, and, Sally you will see by her picture is a smart, wide awake looking girl. Billy's portrait will speak for him. We will endeavour to get likenesses, of Mary and Georgie very soon and when we do get them we shall not fail to send them to you.

I think I told you in my last letter about Emily's marriage. [Her?] and her husband had a pleasant trip to England. They left London on the 24th of last month for the Cape Colony, South Africa, where their home will be for some time. They have a bright future before them, Emily's husband having wealthy connections in Africa, and as Charlie (I mean Emily's husband) is a person of unflagging perseverance and energy he will soon make his mark. We shall hear from them very soon.

William still sticks to farming and says, he is getting along first rate, and is moreover enjoying the best of health. Sarah Anne has urged him to write to you and we hope he has done so.

Please give our best love to Mary and her husband - to Thomas and his wife, to Joseph and John, all of whom we hope are quite well, and accept yourself dear Mother the never failing affection of

Your loving Son and Daughter

Mark and Sarah Ann Bate.

(Page 72)

29th Nov 3

Mr. Thomas Hughes
Harts Hill
Brierley Hill, England

 

My dear old friend

Your thrice-welcome letter of the 21st January last duly came to hand and you cannot conceive my delight on receipt of it. I read it over and over, your account of our doings in the distant past bring to my mind many, very many, pleasant reminiscences of earlier days and I felt a thrill of pleasure in returning my thoughts to the scenes and haunts of our childhood. I sometimes imagine that when I reach Home again (as please God I hope to do) that even if my relatives were nearly all gone - if there were no familiar face to give me a kindly greeting. I should still feel a glow of affection for the trees, the books, and the hills where in boyhood we wandered and whiled away many an innocent hour. (Page 71)

Your promise that my letters shall be promptly answered gives me cheer, and to know that I am frequently spoken of and hold a place in the memory of your dear wife and family is most pleasing to me. Believe me, dear Tom, I have felt no little interest in hearing from time to time, through my dear Mother and others of your prosperity, nor have I forgotten to often inquire about you. Excepting the information you gave me respecting John and Thomas Petford, I do not recollect hearing anything of them for the last ten years at least, and I am very sorry you were not able to communicate rather more encouraging intelligence of their position and character. Alas! It is a weakness too many have to take to the publican what would render their homes comfortable, and make themselves flourish. I have a slight remembrance of the circumstances connected with our going to the Baptist Chapel to meet the Girls, and you pay me a high compliment (do you not?) when you say I on that occasion introduced you to a fortune. Fortunate indeed is the man who has the happy home you seem to posses and I most sincerely wish that all your (Page 74) family may be long preserved to enjoy the blessing of each other’s society. Your situation as superintendent engineer under Messrs Cochrane and Co. I hope is one of increasing advantages. Certainly 130 Pounds per year appears a small salary for the important and probably laborious duties, which are imposed on you. As you suppose, we pay a man occupying a similar position to yours a much larger salary. I am still in the office to which I was posted some 5 years ago, have a gross income of 750 Pounds a year, a fine house, fuel etc. furnished, grates and, of course, am saving money. It costs me considerable, however, to get the children well educated. 400 Pounds has been spent on one girl, who I am proud to say is in every way an accomplished young lady, a good linguist, a good pianist and a beautiful singer. Our oldest boy, now nearly 14, I intend to make a Coal and Mining Engineer because he is so far forward with his mathematical studies, and is fond of mechanical drawing. Our family largely outnumbers yours. We have five girls and four boys. Pretty good you will say for us young folk. My wife is not yet 35. How is Charles Brooks getting on? Where is he? You do not tell me anything about him and I (Page 73) ...therefore infer that he is away from Home- perhaps in the States. I learned first after your poor father's death of the accident which deprived him of life, and I noticed also with pain an announcement in the Brierley Hill paper of the death of your Brother, who, I had not forgotten, but I had not heard of the sad loss to you of your darling children. They are better off no doubt - ushered a few short years before their time into the realms of eternal peace.

I am exceedingly glad though I am not surprised to hear of lack of [--] success in life. [Blurred] He was always for going ahead and he had many opportunities, which he made the best of, which I did not rightly recognize the many kindnesses his good father showed to me. Give my best love, if you please, to Joseph and his father whenever you meet them and tell them I should dearly like to hear from them both. I expect, like myself, they have their hands full of work, but they may manage perhaps to write half a dozen lines which would be very acceptable.

Enclosed I shall send you photographs of myself and wife which please show to any friends you like. That of Sallie, as I call her, was taken a few weeks ago, mine was taken last summer. It is not a clear picture. It, however, shows the features clear enough. May I ask you to send in return a shot of yourself and Mrs. Hughes? I shall be delighted to see your faces if only represented by a few pictures.

My old sweetheart Mary [Pearsdale?], you tell me, is a widow with seven children. I am sorry to hear that. Should you or Mrs. Hughes see her, be good enough to tell her I sympathize with her on having lost her natural supporter and protector.

In conclusion, allow me to ask you to give our best love to my dear Mother and be most kind to remember me to all old and enquiring friends, and for yourself and Mrs. Hughes accept the kindest and best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself and believe me to remain.

With sincere wishes for your welfare

Your affectionate friend

M. Bate

 

(Page 75)

PRIVATE

1st. Dec 73

Dear Mr. Wild

I am extremely sorry to hear by your kind note of the 25th October that you did not see my daughter in London. I had been fully expecting that you would get a little chat with her, and I should hear of her seeing you. I am much disappointed that Alport did not take her specially to call on you for I am certain he would know I should have been greatly pleased had he done so. Writing me from Herne Bay, they both spoke of visiting London and Alport stated that he had received a polite note from Mr. Robins asking him to call at 81 Mildred’s Court. He told me he should call; hence I supposed they would both meet you. However, you can well imagine, I dare say, how it cheers me that you are able to corroborate what Alport told me regarding his Uncle's position in business etc., and I am gratified to know that you esteem the Cape a better place to enjoy life than Vancouver, and that the climate as Beaufort is all that could be desired. I had been given to understand that the country Alport goes to is deluged with rain in the cold season, and that in the hot months scarcely a shower falls to refresh the earth. Alport writes to me very imploringly - hopes my anger against him is modified and begs that I will now accept his connection into our family etc.-- does not think many years will elapse before they meet us all again, and hopes that all his past misdeeds will be forgiven; and then adds, “as they have had no letter from us they will expect to receive our forgiveness and wishes for their well-being at Beaufort West.” He got the telegram I sent after him, and says, referring to it. “For Emily's (Page 76) sake as well as my own, I think I should be most imprudent if I gave up on my Uncle's offer for anything I could hope for in B.C. All my relations in England take the same view of the matter". My earnest wish is that the future will bring them all the happiness they are no doubt looking forward to. They have full forgiveness from me not withstanding the great anguish Alport caused in my house by leaving and taking the child away, as he did. Mrs. Bate still grieves about her darling-- cries almost every time the little ones talk about Emily and has made up her mind her daughter will never see her again. Of course, I try to make her believe otherwise.

I am very sorry to hear of the accident Mr. Robins mother met with, and I hope the unfortunate event may be got over without ill results.

Our progress, I cannot help but confess, is rather slow in some directions. Sometimes I think there is room for considerable improvement in different branches of our mining operations as well as in the shipping department at the Island and I sincerely trust the young gentleman who is coming to assist Mr. Bryden will see where we can amend matters. I presume he has had a few years experience in mine work and if so will soon get acquainted with all the particulars of our establishment. According to my ideas, and I do not mention this without a cause, we want more correct and carefully kept time sheets. We seem to have got into a loose system, and do my utmost I am unable to break through it. Men refuse to take their money on payday because their time is not right - some men's names are not given in at all, and our pay sheet, before we get through with the pay, is a perfect jumble of figures. We got the sheet made up to find out afterwards that it has to be very materially added to - altered etc., which beside giving the book a disorderly appearance [involves?] unnecessary, trouble. I am sure you will think we ought to have time properly kept and recorded - an object of no little importance, and a business that only requires attention, without which negligence follows as a consequence. We have been shipping coal (Page 78)

from Fitzwilliam mine over a year, and up to this time have not so much as a little framework fixed to suspend a chute by. Every vessel that goes to the Island has to hoist and hang the chute by its own tackle, and when the ship moves to get coal in to different hatches the chute is pulled on the wharf by about a dozen Chinamen, who after have to push the chute over the ships side before it is used again. I am almost ashamed to inform you we are laughed at by nearly all the Captains for being so much behind with our means of loading at this new place, and it is with the greatest reluctance that I state Mr. Bryden does not appear to notice what an immense waste of labour is caused by the system we work upon. I cannot at times avoid feeling annoyed and angry that so many things about the new Island pit are left unfinished, No bin cars (the small mine cars, tipped into the shale with a lever are used) no [?] to dump the coal into (Page 77)

as it comes from the mine, and no chute, or pocket, or sloping Bin, to store Coal in, although timber has been on the ground the whole summer to build one or the other. Bryden probably does not like me to draw attention (which is all I can do) to the wants of our business in the directions I have indicated, but the improvements, very often promised, are so long delayed that I have to keep hammering away.

We are slowly increasing the force of workmen in the Pitch, but I am afraid it will be some time before we have many stalls going below the No 1 level. Every month, however, I hope will show some extension of our available mining space. It will be a considerable time, I am certain, ere the No 1 level is cleared of mud - perhaps 6 or 8 months, if not more. There are large rocks met with which retard progress greatly as we near the stall, in which the break is supposed to have occurred, we might get some big stones a less soft stuff. There is such an uncertainty about the back faces, that my colleague does not apparently know when it will be safe to work, and where unsafe, so that we may have to go to the very end of the level [?] or nearly so, to get coal. Of course it will never do to run any risk of broaching the swamp again.

Comox coal claims are receiving a great deal of attention but neither the [?] Beaufort, or Baynes Sound has yet found a purchaser. The Union people are sanguine that capital to open their mine will be forthcoming or a sale offered before the close of next summer.

Since penning my official letters this morning, I have been informed that our Wellington neighbours have a price of coal cutting from 1.20 to 1.10 per ton and on that account the men have struck. In a note from Mr. Bermingham dated 19th ult, he tells me he had a talk with Admiral Cochrane of the ' Repulse' who he says is not very favourably impressed with Wellington coal - the Engineers dislike it very much & complain of the ash and clinker it makes. Mr.

(Page 78) Bermingham says he told the Admiral "it was very different with the Vancouver Coal Co. coal from Fitzwilliam Mine. Perhaps this little conversation might have led to the order for the Black Diamond cargo, referred to in the Directors Diary 21st ultimo?

We have wretched weather just now - everything blocked with snow, and we are looking for a severe winter. Fires are kept about the locomotive and at other places to keep pipes from freezing up. A large gang of Chinese are cleaning the Railway Track.

I shall be on the look out for Mr. Prior and will endeavour to make him contented with his new home. I suppose he is engaged for a few years? He will no doubt be found very useful, and of no small service, in keeping surveys up to the mark. This is a department now in arrears.

Our new clerk is getting fairly well posted in his duties. He is very attentive, punctual, and altogether a good man. I consider myself fortunate on getting Alport's place so well filled.

Hoping you are well and wishing you a Happy New Year.

I remain Dear Mr. Wild

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 79)

Nanaimo

3 Dec. 1873

Messrs Drake and Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I am obliged for your favor of the 28th ultimo, and now beg to request you to pay up the Judgment against Chantrell, and on receiving particulars I will at once remit the amount of Rodellos claim. You seem to have lost sight of my former letters asking you to pay the sum of Rodellos note, and not to allow judgment to issue, but I suppose that does not matter much.

Of course in paying up the judgment, you will examine and get possession of the note given by Chantrell to ascertain that the claim is correct. The note it is very likely will be wanted on Chantrell's return.

Please do not let it be known who is settling this business in Chantrell's interest. I am most anxious that my name should not be used.

Yours very Truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

(Page 80)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am extremely obliged for your very interesting letter of the 19th ultimo, and particularly pleased to learn that you had an opportunity of speaking to Admiral Cochrane [and?] Coal business generally. Should you be writing to him, or should you again see him would there be any harm in recommending him to invest in our Company Shares? It may be an advantage to have him hold a little of the Company's stock. While I am writing on this subject, I may mention that tenders are invited by the navy for a supply of coal, for the next year from the 5th May. To my surprise, a cargo from Fitzwilliam Mine was taken to Esquimalt the other day and I am thinking it is likely your conversation with Admiral might have led to the order. Could you, on receipt of this, do anything to prompt Broderick etc to offer our coal in preference to the Wellington? A word from you might have good effect. I enclose (Page 81) the advertisement so that you can say you have seen it, if you refer to the matter.

Dunsmuir had a strike on Monday last (1st). He told the men they were to work at reduction of 10 cents-per ton for mining, and every one of them threw down their tools! On the next morning, they were told to go on at the old rate. The fact is, as I am informed by hands, they (Diggle etc.) are getting nothing out of the concern.

If you can do so, please let me have two or three 800 to 1000 ton ships for Fitzwilliam mine. We are going along with the work at the Island pretty lively, have commenced the Bore. I before referred to, near the site Bell landed upon, and in about 4 to 5 months at the outside coal should be reached.

I am looking for a young Engineer by next 'Prince Alfred' who you will perhaps be aware is coming to attend to the surveying department and assist Bryden generally. [overwritten]

[P?] doings I have observed in the paper and I note your remark respecting him. He shall get nothing put in his way here if I know it.

The ‘Panther' and ['Larke'?] had long passages down I suppose shall be glad of their early return. The 'Constitution' is outside for Wellington Mine. I hope Mr. Rosenfeld will arrive safe and sound. Please give my regards to him.

The 'Otter' has been given 23 tons of Chase River coal for trial and reports very favourably upon it. Fully as good as Dunsmuir's they say. The small lot sent to you I expect would hardly be enough for a satisfactory test.

Capt. Harris of the 'Arkwright' seems to have a drunken mate and some of his crew are troublesome. The Captain himself is a patient, attentive and good fellow, and I am sorry he has any bother with his men. Emily's Grandmother, my Mother wants to get a large picture of her. Would you kindly inquire if we can get one or two copies on card only, like that she had framed. I am thinking perhaps they have the negatives, and can print them ad libitum.

With kind regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

I remain

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 82)

10th. Dec 1873

Private

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen Re: Chantrell

I am duly in receipt of your favor of the 8th inst, and am pleased to note by it that you “are satisfied you would succeed in obtaining a note to set aside the judgment of the grounds of irregularity if we should apply for it." If you are still of the same opinion, and have not paid the amount of Judgment or settlement of the matter in any way, I am quite willing to go to the expense of $50.00 or even to $60.00 to get the judgment set aside. I [?] with Mr. Rodelle and gathered from him that he sold the note to Capt. Spalding (for a small consideration I believe) and Rodelle has nothing to do with the matter as far as I can understand. I have every confidence that you will do what is best both in my own interest and for the protection of Mr. Chantrell, and

I am, gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 83)

17 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

 

Gentlemen

I am duly in receipt of your favor of the 11th inst with enclosures, and I now beg to forward you cheque for the amount of Chantrell's note, interest, and costs, viz $328.75  I am glad you have settled the matter.

On the 29th Sept last I left at the office of the Registrar General the deed of Chantrell's property, and my mortgage for Registration. Mr. Aikman promised to send the documents to me, after he had made the necessary entries, but he has not done so, Will you have the goodness to obtain the papers and transmit them to me under registration cover?

And, greatly oblige Gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate (Page 84)

18 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria

 

Dear Sir

I duly received yours of the 15th inst. with enclosures. Bro. Webb has executed a new Deed which has been duly acknowledged before N.B. Spalding. I went to get Webb’s Deed tonight but he was not at Home, and I am sorry I am unable to send it. His deed I know is not registered and both the vendor, or signer (the Company Secretary) and witness C.A. Alport are out of the Colony. I counter-signed the Deed, as did also Mr. Bryden; I will look up Webb to get his Deed of Transmission to you next week. You will know what can be done with it.

The Building will hardly be ready, as far as I can judge, before the end of Jan’y. at the earliest. We merely require to usual conditions in the Lease-nothing special that I am aware of, excepting what I previously wrote to you.

We have already insured in the Royal for $2000.00.

(Page 85)

The Building Committee tonight decided to accept your offer of a loan at 9% per annum. They wish to borrow $1200.00 for two years and I was requested to ask you, to make arrangements that we may draw as the money is required. The Deed of our property I herewith send you. Will you kindly prepare a Mortgage and send us by first opportunity? I will see the mortgage promptly executed by the trustees, and it shall be forwarded to you without delay. We require to draw part of the money next week, and will you have the goodness to let us know if we shall draw on you or if you will deposit the $1200.00 with your Bankers for our account? Whichever plan you choose will suit us.

We are exceedingly pleased that our petition was granted, and personally I do not doubt but Ashlar Lodge will prosper.

Heartily thanking you for, and reciprocating your kind wishes.

I am, very truly & fraternally yours

M. Bate

(Page 86)

22 Dec 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have the pleasure to own the receipt of your kind favor of the 14th inst, and I have to thank you for your great goodness in getting Mrs. Bermingham to have the photographs of Mrs. Bate and myself enlarged. Unfortunately, we cannot secure pictures here equal to those produced in your city. We might be a long time before we get any more taken, and we therefore decided to let the artist dress up those sent to you in the best way he can. The face of my own likeness is not at all clear. We shall be glad to get a dozen of the Photos of Emily and Alport.

I was not aware you had an interest in the 'Arkwright'. I wish, however, you & Mr. Rosenfeld owned the whole of her. The Capt. of that vessel (Harris) seemed to take great care of things generally on both his voyages here, and judging from what I saw of him he is a much superior man in many respects to most of the shipmasters we get here. The donkey engine was out of order this last trip and we did some little repairs for him. He had an inexperienced driver on board and was watching the machinery himself on one or two occasions.

Mrs. Rosenfeld's return with improved health I am glad to hear of. Mr. Prior tells me that Mr. Rosenfeld said he would take a run up this way before long. We haven't had the 'Prince Alfred' to clean bottom for quite a time. If you conclude to send her here to be beached, one of these days perhaps Mr. Rosenfeld will then come and look at us? Please give my regards to him.

In looking after the San Francisco Gas Co., Mr. Rosenfeld is apparently displaying his usual foresight. I hope he will get a good price.

Broderick etc., I firmly believe do not know what conclude about to [This section is faint and seems all about loading delays] What they want [?] is gross exaggeration. The vessels [?] they refer to were at our wharfs about a day and not more. They made an unusually [?] had freight for to deliver [?] return trip were loaded in some 3 ½ hours. They do not give us credit for that. The Newcastle Coal was first put aboard, I told the weigher to be sure and well clean it, and to do so took extra time to load. Just as soon as the Captain of the 'Emma' complained or rather mentioned that he had made a long trip up and was in a hurry to get down, I sent word to the Island to fill the chute up quickly with Fitzwilliam coal, and the vessel left the same evening. I [?] assured Broderick and Co. that, at all times, we endeavour to serve their interests and will always give due attention to the wants of the vessels.

Chase River coal I think you will find will go well for steam, the ash being light when subject to draft, a deal of it seems to be carried away. We are only taking out about 10 tons a day of this coal.

With best wishes in which Mrs. Bate joins me

I remain Sincerely yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 88)

30 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

Your favor of the 22nd inst. duly came to hand. I herewith send you Webb's Deed that you may see what, if anything, can be done to get it registered. I am of the opinion that an acknowledgment made by myself would be of no service.

We are very thankful for your good offices in making arrangements to meet our drafts, and although Bros. Renwick and Mayer have not yet signified their intention to give our joint note for, say one half the sum we may draw to be paid in 12 months, I think we shall soon decide to do so.

With best wishes, I am (In great haste)

Yours very truly M. Bate

 

(Page 89)

5 Jan . 4 [1874]

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Accept a thousand thanks for the interest you have evinced and the trouble you have taken [anent?] the Navy Coal Contract. The letter to Messrs Broderick & Co and to Mr. James (copies of which you sent with your kind favor of the 6th ultimo) will no doubt do good. If we can get the War Vessels to take a little of our coal occasionally, we shall be satisfied. Capt. Egerton (one of Dunsmuir’s partners) who is at Victoria specially to see about the Contract, may have sufficient influence to get their Coal used entirely. On my first trip to Esquimalt, I shall call on Mr. Innes who perhaps might do something in the way of getting a Man O' War to call at our wharf once in a while. I verily believe our production of coal the present year will largely exceed that of any previous 12 months. The 'Dashing Wave' did not take all the old Douglas coal by nearly 1200 tons. We gave the 'California' 14 tons from the old pit on the 3rd and today we are under the obligation of loading the 'Black Diamond' on this side. As far as possible. we will retain the Old Douglas as you suggest, and send off the Fitzwilliam. I believe we shall have a full load for the 'Panther'.

(Page 90)

Mr. Robins mentioned in one of his late letters the substance of Mr. Rosenfeld’s conversation referring to the treatment of Captains, Naval officers, etc. and I have no doubt you are quite right in your opinion upon the effect of a little spirits etc. judiciously dispersed. Please thank Mr. Rosenfeld (for one) for his goodness in interesting himself on my behalf. I hope nothing will interfere with his intention to come up here. I shall be most pleased to see him before he again goes to Europe. If there is any chance of him not being able to come to Nanaimo with the 'Prince Alfred', I may arrange to meet him in Victoria. In the event of his reaching the latter place, however, I suppose he will come right on. The Directors will be highly gratified to learn of the new contract with Messrs Pope & Talbot at a reduction of 75 cents per ton. More though once of late the secretary has deplored our inability to get out [more? hard?] coal so that Mr. Rosenfeld may be enabled to quickly work out the [-----?] contract; and he has hinted that thereupon Mr. Rosenfeld would most likely obtain means of conveyance at lower rates - That happily has been accomplished.

Bichard told me (on our way to Victoria) that in 6 mos. time coal would be up - ever so high. His prognostication is not in a fair way of being reached. Some of the vessels he sends to Dunsmuir must have a great length of lay days. The 'Union' has been at Departure Bay 18 days for something less than 600 tons. We want a few more small vessels for Fitzwilliam Mine. There will be 2000 tons in the heap after the 'Park' is filled up.

It is very good of you to look after the photos we want. If you will kindly obtain one of the plain pictures of Emily @ 5.00. I think that will be suitable.

In my letter to Mr. Rosenfeld of the 22nd ult., I asked for information about an Engine for ballast and pile driving purposes. You will know exactly what will suit us. One rather more powerful than that of Cooper's we may do well to get one. I have a notion of attaching a crane to the engine we get, to be so fixed that we can turn it out of the way when not wanted.

Accept the united respects of Mrs. Bate and of

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 91)

7 Jan 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

I have to thank you for your very kind letter of the 28th of November, and would beg to say in reference to the purchase of shares on my account that I was not over anxious to buy at a high premium, and it will be advisable, I think, to wait a while to see if the number I want are obtainable at a lower figure. My faith in the future of the Company prosperity is unshaken. The prospects ahead are as good as they ever were - as far as the actual mining as concerned, and there is no reason why we should not go on quite as successfully as hitherto, but we must keep a sharp look out for leaks in every direction. Excessive freight and low prices we can hardly endure. I hope Rosenfeld will not use that advertisement in any way to the Company's disadvantage. He certainly is making a good thing out of his agency, and if he is not satisfied, it would be difficult to say what would satisfy him. He expects to get from us this year 38000 tons which will pay him $19,000.00 commission - a really handsome sum. Should he not obtain a commission for the Company on Charters i.e. Freight contracts? I think so. You will readily comprehend what a stimulus is given to our Wellington friends by realizing better prices than we obtain. I do not know if they are aware they get a higher rate than we do. I am inclined to believe they are, but getting such good returns has helped them wonderfully, and enabled them to carry out what they never could if they sold coal at about 4.50 per ton. You have perhaps heard that Bichard first applied to us for coal. He wanted to contract for the purchase of 2000 tons per month. Of course as he desired the coal for the San Francisco market I referred him, or rather his agent, to Mr. Rosenfeld.

(Page 92) As regards the improvement of our works- of our production of coal, we, as you rightly say we want more push, and better organization of working plans, in a word we need less undoing. Jobs of many kinds are often started to be altered, abandoned etc., and I am perplexed at times to notice useless expenditure. I have lately introduced the matter of examining the ground on the opposite of the Bay from our Newcastle mine & the boring from Fitzwilliam [seam?] to Newcastle. Mr. Bryden approves the latter, but never seems to pay any attention to my propositions to go nearer the Wellington seam. There is a sort of family compact of Dunsmuir’s crowd, and I am very sorry my colleague is connected with them. He, of course, cannot help that, but his sympathies go with them, seems pleased, apparently, when anything is said in favour of the Wellington coal etc as against ours, and although he knows all the “family” movements, never lets out a word. It is like drawing a tooth to get him to speak about what Dunsmuir is doing at his mine. The Harewood Land, I am pretty certain, is now partly owned by the Wellington concern, and I think Mr. Bryden might have given a hint to let it be known what was going on. I have heard that Mr. Ward of Bank of BC has a share in Harewood. Last night I got a private note from him. He asks, "What do you think of Mr. Bulkley's purchase of the Harewood property? He seems disposed to go to work at once to get the coal to market. He talks of going to England by next steamer (i.e. 26th inst) to make necessary arrangements for rails and plant etc. I suppose that any thing that increases the trade to Nanaimo is good for your folks, and that making it a coal centre will help the trade in coal generally. Two San Francisco men are coming up this month re Baynes Sound Mine." I don't imagine Harewood will do us any more harm, for a year of two at any rate than take off some of our men. A class of overhands seems always glad to leave us. While it will not be wise perhaps to put any obstacles in the way of the new Harewood (Page 93) proprietors it will certainly not be politic to assist them. I fancy two or three or more of our miners have the contract for driving the tunnel at Harewood. None of Dunsmuir's men have offered, it is said. If good coal is found in the exploration about to be undertaken would it be worthwhile making any overtures to amalgamate? say by giving shares of Vancouver Coal Co for the Harewood. If Mr. Buckley, who I have heard is a man of means, is going home as Ward states I will request him, either by letter or personally if I see him to call at the company’s office. There might be a chance of finding out what land he wants, and of coming to a settlement about it. I informed Mr. Bulkley when he said he could not tell me how he would take his road that I would prefer corresponding with the Board before going into the matter, which we could not do [till?] his plans were decided upon. Mr. Prior will make an exceedingly (6) useful man here. He has surveyed the No.1 level and some of the [stalls?]. The level according to the survey is right under the [---way?] but as the stall furthest from the pit is 100 yards from the back of the level our upper or rise workings are probably quite safe. Since Prior has been here, excepting two or three days he has been going around with Bryden to get well posted. He now begins to feel as if he could walk alone.

[More Comox Company’s?] will be hard to deal with I am afraid. So much importance do they attach to the great iron ore discovery, for great it is that the Union share holders who are able to hold on are opposed to selling at all. Dr. Ash too might have bigger ideas his place by reason of its proximity to Texada. The Company might do well to try and deal with the Doctor and let Mr. Bryden go up and make a thorough examination of his place. It might be of more value than one would suppose from a mere walk over it.

Mr. Bell's bill of $35 seems very high for what he did here. In fact, beyond looking at the mines and going to Comox, nearly everything was done for him. He has a notion, it appears, that the Union Company's coal would be found nearer the sea at Comox. It would, in my opinion, be too deep altogether to go for either of the seams within 4 miles of Comox Harbour, or any stopping point. The coal at its deepest place in the Union Claim will be 100 fathoms seeming to the dip, which has been given - but there are years of work level free.

I am a little anxious about a good claim at Comox but still more anxious to see our works expand. This Wellington seam is turning out [115?] tons, 90 of which is conveyed to the wharf and a heap is accumulating at the slope head. My colleagues only smile when I tell them they will overtake us.

With best wishes I am dear Mr. Wild

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 94)

20 Jan 74

My Dear Sir

Expecting to see the ' Prince Alfred' here with you on board, about the 25th inst, we shall get all our wagons filled with coal ready to deliver to the steamer. I hope nothing will interfere with you or the 'Prince' to prevent your coming up this way as you intended when writing on the 5th. If I thought there was any probability of your not reaching this far, I would go to Victoria and meet you there. All being well however, I have no doubt you will come to Nanaimo if you get to Victoria.

I write officially by mail on one or two business matters - a copy of the letters you will be able to see here.

Looking soon for the pleasure of shaking your hand and with best wishes.

I am very truly yours

M. Bate

John Rosenfeld Esq.

 

(Page 95)

 

21st Jan’y 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

In my letter to you of 7th instant, I referred to the supposed ownership of the Harewood Estate, and I mentioned that I had heard that Mr. W. C. Ward has some share in the concern, which seems quite probable from his reference to Mr. Bulkley in one or two letters he has written to me. Last night, I received a note from him on which he says: "Mr. Bulkley leaves for England by next 'Prince Alfred'- say on 26th. Is Mr. Wild now in London? If so, I thought I would give a letter to him as it would do no harm for him to see some of your Company in London, and I don't know any of the other Directors. I believe Mr. B has let a contract to run a tunnel to prove the coal to some extent.

In answer to Mr. Ward, I have told him you will likely be found in London, and I have dropped a note to Mr. Bulkley as follows:

My Dear Sir

Hearing that you are about to proceed to London, may I suggest that you call at this Company's office No 2 St, Mildred's Court, [Poulty?].

Probably some question or other affecting our mutual interest might be talked over and considered. In any case, I have no doubt our Directors and secretary will be pleased to meet you.

Wishing you a pleasant journey. I am etc”

Seeing that Mr. Ward is desirous of Mr. Bulkley calling on you, I should not have written to him, only I thought it might be well to keep on terms with him as friendly as possible - at any rate till it is seen how Harewood will pan out as the Gold diggers say.

In my official letter of today, I have informed the Board of Mr. Bulkley running and claiming a line from Harewood to the beach at the site of Bolton's "ways". The property, by the by, that Bolton bought is 3 lots- 12x3 Block 51 now belongs to Bank of B.C. and it may be that Ward wants to utilize it. He was offering the 3 lots a short time ago for $500.

Now with regards to a Railway from Harewood, if one is to be made, I should say every effort should be made to retain the tongue of land the Harewood folks wanted 10 years ago - that is the peninsula opposite the Newcastle mines. If feasible, it is more than probable Mr. Bulkley and his partners may prefer to get a right of way to the Bank’s lots at Nanaimo Harbour rather than go to Departure Bay which would be nearly two miles further. But the Board will desire to look to our own interest in the matter as paramount and there are these points to be dwelt upon: 1st. Is it wise to offer any advantage to Mr. Bulkley to bring a shorter road to Nanaimo Harbour, by which his expense making and running afterward would be comparatively [low?] 2nd. Would it not be better to give some inducement to get a longer road to a spot a little farther along the South West shore of Departure Bay than the "tongue" before alluded to. Of course in considering the matter, it maybe prudent to have in mind the probable relations the new firm may bear to us after a time, that is, the prospect of amalgamation, in some way, if Harewood should turn out well. All this, however, and more, the Directors will look to undoubtedly, at the proper moment. At present it is not easy to judge, or form an opinion what Mr. Bulkley is about.

You will be sorry to hear of the wreck of the 'Panther'. Nothing is known of the ['Goliath'?]. It is feared she too has met with some disaster if not gone down altogether, with all on board.

The weather just now is bitterly cold and part of the harbour is frozen over.

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

Very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 97)

21st Jan’y 4

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

Many, many thanks for your infinite goodness in sending our Photos: they are excellent, at least we think so. They are so much admired that Mrs. Bate wants to keep them, and it is not improbable that I may well trouble you to send us frames; that is, if Mrs. Bate keeps of the same mind. I will promptly send cheque on receipt of Bill.

On Sunday (25th) I shall be on the look out for Mr. Rosenfeld. All our wagons will be filled with coal and we shall let no other vessel interfere with the 'Prince's' coaling. Mr. Rosenfeld will find us nearly buried with snow, about 2 feet of the ground, and bitterly cold. The night of the day the ' Panther' (Some particulars of whose wreck I give in my official letter) and 'Goliath' left here it blew up a perfect hurricane up this way. Trees were toppled over by the dozen, and I thought the House was going down. I never remember anything like it.

(Page 98) The 'Goliath' is missing but I sincerely hope she will turn up.

I send Bills of lading of the 'Panther', 'Parks' and 'Mary Glover' cargoes imagining that they may be needed, as the Newspapers report the 'Parks' has put back to Royal Roads in distress.

Dunsmuir has done nothing the past week at the mine and as to his having plenty of coal, vessels come to me and say they can't get any at the Wellington wharf. With his present appliances if he gets out 180 tons a day [he his doing well?], but I don't think it will last long, 2 or 3 years perhaps.

The Douglas coal seems safe. At least we are getting no water from the swamp. We are better off with means of pumping than we were last winter. Seattle Gas Company [are?] sending to us for Douglas Coal. I don't suppose they will consume much. Our men are beginning to go to the new diggings already: the 'Otter' takes the first batch. There is not, however, many miners among those now leaving us.

The 'Antioch' is still at Departure Bay not yet loaded. The tug 'Grapple' has been waiting for her 4 days.

Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and of yours most sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 99)

[Note at top of page, written in red ink.” Handed to Lucky [sic] to post and register]

31st Jan’y 1874

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island

C. N. Chantrell Esq.
[Mendelian?] Villa
Ramsgate, Kent
England
 

My Dear Sir

I was informed the other day by Mr. C. A. Young that he had received a letter from you written at the above address. I need hardly mention that I was much pleased to learn that you were 'safe'. All sorts of rumours have been current here regarding you, and it was intimated, about a month ago, that we need not expect to hear from you again, that you had settled in the vicinity of Fort Edmonton and did not intend to come here any more etc. etc. That all these reports were groundless your letter to Mr. Young partly affirms, and I trust

(Page 100) you will be preparing to return hither by the time this gets into your hands. Mr. Young will have told you, doubtless, of the trouble and expense I have been put to in order to prevent the sale of your land by Public Auction at a considerable abatement, perhaps, in what I would look upon as its real value. It appears [?] Rodello, of course, needs a promissory note of yours for $180.00. The note Rodello sold to Spalding for a small sum, I am told, and Spalding filed the note in the court at Victoria (--?) for the amount of it with some 5 years interest - you who were out of the jurisdiction of the Court was cited to appear, and as you did not and the amount of the claim was not paid.

Judgment was given against you and would have been satisfied, out your land had I not advanced the amount of the Judgment with costs viz. $328.75.

Wishing to hear from you, and, at all events, to give you every opportunity to redeem the mortgage. I have kept it without taking any steps to foreclose although the interest has not been paid for over a year, and I write now mainly to say I am quite willing to take a new Mortgage for the sum of my loan advance and interest for another 6 months or year. But for the protection of your property, you should have an agent here, if you are not coming out right away yourself. Your house and perhaps part of your land might be leased to advantage and rightly looked after if you had a duly authorized agent in this place.

Mr Young tells me he is quite willing (Page 99) to act as your Agent, and I would strongly recommend you to send him a full Power of Attorney. Properly executed, and attested before a proper person so that your business and interests may be rightly attended to.

Hoping you are well, and begging you to treat the note in as confidential manner as you can.

I am

yours very truly.

M. Bate

(Page 101)

5 Feb 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

As you might suppose, I was delighted to meet Mr. Rosenfeld. He is just the wide-awake, vivacious person I took him to be. And his disposition is as genial as openhanded. He will doubtless give you the gist of our conversation: these questions which Mr. Rosenfeld wishes to be always dealt with in a confidential manner shall be duly regarded, and his directions touching foreign shipments be implicitly followed.

I think I told you in my last that we are more than pleased with the pictures and Mrs. Bate is very loath to part with them. I enclose a cheque for the bills of our own and Emily and Alport's photos which I believe you will find correct amount of Cheque $86.00. Is there anything I can possibly do for you to compensate for your great kindness?

(Page 102) Bichard is still drawing freely on Dunsmuir, Diggle etc. for coal. The old man (Dunsmuir) got on a bender last week and stowed himself away somewhere. I think he turned up a day or two ago in a very shaky condition.

I have ordered one engine in my official letter today. We think it as well to get a 6 ½ or 7 inch cylinder so that we might use the engine for temporary winding purposes in exploration etc. The model of Cooper and Taylor's Donkey will be the thing, and I believe you know exactly what that is.

Some six or seven of our men went by the stmr. California for [C----?] but strangers have come fortunately to take their places and we are not at present shorthanded. It is very probable, however, that many more will leave us. We shall try to convince all we can to stay.

You have heard perhaps ere this that Broderick got the navy contract. I expect Egerton has a good deal of influence among the men of war Captains and Engineers and that on that account his coal will be wanted. We have no need to fret about the matter, and if they don't patronize us we can't help it.

We have struck coal about [2?] feet thick at the bottom of Fitzwilliam Slope today, but do not know for certain if we have the regular seam. It will not lake long I hope to find out.

Please give the united regards of myself and Mrs. Bate to Mr. Rosenfeld and accept the same yourself

from yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 103)

9 February 74

My Dear Cousin

I was delighted to get your kind letter on [26th?] Oct last. It does seem strange that 17 ½ years should have passed since I left home, without any correspondence between us, and now we have "set the ball going let us keep it rolling." You must not suppose my dear William that I have forgotten you because I have not written to you. My dear Mother can tell you how often I have enquired about you and the other Bates-George, Isaac, Thomas, John and Joseph, our cousins, some of whom you tell me are at Walsall. I have asked more particularly about you, however, as I saw nothing of the others for some years before I left England. I am surprised to learn that those of our late Uncle Joseph's family which you saw at Walsall would not condescend to speak to you. I suppose I might be the possessor of more wealth than any of them, but that surely is not the reason that I should show such a want of respect and feeling as did our friends at Walsall. It would do me good to get a shake of your hand and a look at your face, also I would go a considerable distance for that purpose if we should meet each other. I have a decided intention to go home before long if only for a visit but I could not leave my duty just yet. I am sorry to hear that you are not rid of the bad leg you had before I left Home. I well remember how it affected you. What is really the matter with it? I continue (Page 104)

to send you newspapers and I think you get them regularly. The news they contain does not interest you very much I expect. They will give you some idea though of what is going on in this remote corner of the globe. If you can send me a Birmingham paper occasionally I shall be much gratified.

I report and state I have not heard of my dear Brother Joseph since he got to New York on his way home. It is a mystery to me what has become of him. He may turn up, as I sincerely hope he will one of these days.

With regard to the House belonging to Joseph, his son is coming of age and getting the property under his [?] can always [?] it is received by Uncle John [?] and refund of the [?] any disbursements for repair on the property. Uncle John seems very [?] in granting a certificate of Birth [?] son. There will be no difficulty perhaps in complying with these conditions.

I send you enclosed a portrait of myself, and of my darling Sallie, and one of our little boy William who will be 3 years old on the 12 of the present month. We have only 9 children, four boys and five girls. The eldest girl Emily is married. If I do not send you a photograph of Emily and her husband this time, I will when I can write to you. Our oldest boy Mark is nearly 14 years old and he is a fine, robust looking chap. Then we have Sarah Ann and Mary Beatrice, George Arthur [?], Alicia Mary Beatrice, William and Elizabeth Ada. A long list you will think for us young folk. My wife is not yet 35, I am just turned 37. You do not tell me what family you have.

Now my dear Cousin let us have a long letter from you on receipt of this giving all the news you can. Of all friends around you whom I know and of our relatives who are still within (Page 104) reach. Aunt Elizabeth, my dear Mother told me some time ago is married again and living at [P------] On the morning I left Home to come here, I met poor Uncle Joseph [--] nearly opposite the House he [------] on the Hill. After some little talk he said "Well goodbye, remember me when you get there". I have never forgotten his words. I am pleased you tell me you go to see my dear Mother sometimes and I shall be glad if you will let her know we are all well giving our best love to her and tell her to expect a letter and [?]

You will perceive as I am still in the place and occupying the position I have held for some years as manager of the business Company whose name heads this letter. They give me a good salary 762 Pounds a year, found me a good house and fuel etc. [?] As you may [?] imagine, we are having some [?accumulating property?] very good position here. I long to go Home. I yearn to see my dear good Mother once again as I know from the hard life she has lived the last 20 years she would be speechless.

God grant we may be spared to [?] each other

My wife find her in anxiety often not sleeping. [?]

(Page 103)

For yourself and wife our united love and please [?] My Dear William .

Your most affectionate nephew

Mark

 

(Page 105)

7th Feb 74

My Dear Brother and Sister

I have had your kind letter of the 2nd March 1873 by me for some months and ought to have acknowledged the receipt of it long ago, but the fact is I have so much writing to do that I am neglecting to give proper attention to the letters of relatives and friends. This I ought not to do, and in the future I must try and be prompt with my answers to all the letters sent me from Home. But I have been expecting the photographs you promised to send, and still expect them, and shall continue to expect till they come to hand. Please do not keep me in most anxious suspense much longer.

We were very glad to hear you all enjoyed good health at the time you wrote and I sincerely trust this will find you all well. Two of our little ones are rather unwell, one is teething, the other has a cold. With these exceptions, we have no reason to complain. Our family is growing up fast. Emily is married and is likely to do extremely well. I have had her husband employed as clerk in our office, for some years, and […?] (Page 106) persevering, well educated, and highly connected. Both Emily and her husband have gone to South Africa where they will reside for some time. The name of Emily's husband is Charles Augustus Alport. He has a rich uncle in Africa - Cape of Good Hope- who sent for him and I believe they will prosper abundantly in their new home. In two or three weeks from this, I will write to you again and send you portraits of both Emily and Charlie. Mark is growing a fair, robust chap. He will be 14 years old on the 17th of next May. We keep him at school and shall give him another year or two at college. All the rest of our darlings are strong and apparently healthy. I shall send you one or two photographs herewith. That of Sarah Anne, which you ask for, I suppose you will hardly recognize. It is a pretty clear picture, but not quite a true likeness. At least I think Sarah Ann is “handsomer” than the photo. That of our little boy William (“Billy” I call him) is a perfect portrait. He is a dear little boy 3 years old the 12th of next month. Since I last wrote to you we have another addition to our family - a girl, who we have named Elizabeth Ada. I have made many enquiries for my dear Brother Joseph but I cannot trace him beyond New York. He got there all right, and a fellow traveler with him wrote (Page 107) that when he left Joseph he was to start for England next day. Whether he did leave for England or not, I have not been able to find out. I would give anything almost to know where he is. Elizabeth and Lucy are well, I believe, as are also their husbands. Elizabeth resides about 60 miles from here and Lucy is staying with her just now. Lucy never seems to write to anybody. I do not know what to make of her.

I am exceedingly sorry to hear that my dear good mother is so rapidly declining, and I wish sincerely I could in some way add to her comfort in her old age. I sent her 5 pounds last October and shall send her more in a week or two. But I am not in a position to say if the money is applied to her wants. It would pain me very much if I thought she needed anything that I could supply. Kindly remember us to Ann Maria and her husband. I expect she does not recollect much of us. I am still as fond of business as ever, and play a cornet in our Brass Band we have here. I stick to the violin too; I could never give up the “old fiddle"

Aunt Maria is going home again this spring I believe. She is coming back again and is talking of bringing your Emma out with her, and I hope she will.

Now my dear brother and sister, as soon as you get this, write a short note I don't care how short it is. If you have no other news just let me know how you are, where you are, and if you want anything I can help you to. I shall enclose half a sovereign in this letter.

My darling Sallie sends her kindest and best love to you both, and to all your family, and like myself would dearly like to see you. In conclusion, please accept the never failing affection of

Your loving Brother

M. Bate

(Page 108)

24 Feb 74

My dear Mother

You can scarcely imagine how pleased I was to get your kind letter of the 4th of January. I was just thinking about writing to you when your letter reached me, as I have something to send you. I am exceeding glad you are able to say your health is improved, and I sincerely hope every care will be taken to keep you from unnecessary exposure, and that the money I send you will be the means of providing such things as you need for your comfort and for the maintenance of your health.

I do not ask you, my dear Mother, to write long letters to me. A note ever so short will please me when you have to pen it yourself. Even half a dozen words. I should prize very highly because I know that it must be quite a job for you to write at length.

When I got the picture of myself which you kindly sent me, I looked at it and thought, who is this? I did not know my own likeness, till I read your letter, and then I recognized the waistcoat and scarf on the neck. I handed the picture to Sarah Anne and asked if she knew whose it was. She replied at once "why that's your photograph, the one you had taken at Birmingham when we went there one Whitsuntide. She had a photo taken at the same time, and did not forget it. I presume my likeness was copied by my Uncle George, as I see his name on the back of it. If he is still at Holly Hill, please give my best love to him and ask him if he will be good enough to send me a picture of himself. Ernest is a fine young man. When we were in Victoria last September, he spent nearly a day with us at Aunt Maria's. We have written to Aunt Maria to ask her to come to stay with us a week or two, as she promised to do some time ago. She still talks of going

Home soon and I rather think she will. I have some thought of sending Mark with my Aunt if his mama will consent, that is, if Aunt Maria will bring him back again.

I am most surprised and annoyed that Lucy has not written to you as she promised to do. She is now away at Comox staying with Elizabeth, who gave birth to a daughter on the 8th instant, which was Emily's birthday. Elizabeth, her husband, and their children are all well, and Lucy and her husband are well. Herewith, you will get a photo of Emily and her husband which I think you will be glad to see. Please let my Uncle George take a look at it.

I shall write you again very soon. We are all well, and send our best love to all friends. For yourself dear Mother and father-in-law accept the never dying love of Sarah Anne and of your affectionate son

M. Bate

[A bill of 5 pounds is enclosed?]

 

(Page 110)

24 Feby 74

My dear Brother and Sister

I wrote to you on the 7th instant and I promised to write to you again soon, I now fulfill my promise and enclose a Bill of Exchange for 5 pounds which will no doubt be acceptable. In my last, I sent you half a sovereign.

If you have not had the photographs taken that I have been expecting so long I hope you will get them soon after you receive this letter, and send them to me. I long to see your faces if only represented by a [--?] [picture. Yesterday I got a letter from my dear Mother in which she sent me a copy of the likeness I had taken at Birmingham about a year before I left Home. Would you believe me I did not know my own portrait when I saw it? Sarah Anne recognized it at once, and our friends say the picture is just like my Mark.

The day after I wrote to you (8th) Elizabeth gave birth to a daughter. She is very well and baby is coming on finely. The 8th of Feb’y is my Emily's birthday, so that we have a girl each born on the same day of the same month.

Aunt Maria will be going Home soon I think, but before she starts she is coming to stay a (Page 111) week or two with us. I intend to try to induce her to find you out soon after her arrival in England so you must not be surprised if she drops in upon you unawares, one of these fine days. I am still in the same office I have occupied for some years, and am doing well. I have every reason to be thankful that my position is so good, and that I can look forward to increasing prosperity. I wish you were all with us here. British Columbia is a glorious country. Would you like to come out and take up farming? I have lately bought 100 acres of splendid land for farming purposes, and if I am to make any use of it I shall have to have somebody to "plough and to sow" etc.

Elizabeth's husband is doing first rate and Lucy is in very comfortable circumstances.

We are all well, I am glad to say, and I sincerely hope you well be able to give me equally good news when you write in answer to this, which I hope you will do at a very early date after you get it, that I may know you have the money all right

Accept the best love of myself and Sarah Anne, and believe me I remain

Your affectionate

Brother

M. Bate

 

(Page 112)

25 Feby 74

Dear Capt. Harris

I was surprised to learn by your kind note of the 17th ultimo that you had relinquished the command of the 'Arkwright', and I need hardly tell you that on the arrival of that vessel you were missed, not only by myself but by others of your friends who were sorry that you had left the ship.

Your successor is a Captain [Black?] - a stranger to me. He was here many years ago as mate of a small bark, and talks a good deal of Dutch, and very little English. I was not on board the ship all the time he was here. Capt. [Balck?], whose name you mention, was in command of the 'Panther' which vessel got ashore in Haro Straits on the day your letter was written, and is now, after an attempt to float her, abandoned as a total wreck.

Many of us here will be glad to see you again, but I suppose the chances of your coming to Nanaimo are, to say the least, very remote. I should be pleased to hear of your doing better than Captains do in Pope & Talbot employ. Certainly the Salary they (Page 113) pay their Shipmasters a wholly inadequate- not at all commensurate to the cares and responsibilities of the position.

We had a concert here two or three weeks ago, and several of the singers and performers said they wished you had been on the 'Arkwright' instead of the strange gentleman who I should imagine from what I saw of him, is not a musician in any sense of the word, and not very fond of music.

You, no doubt, like myself will have your fill of singing and playing at Home among the little ones, and you will have opportunities of listening to a class of music superior to anything we can look at here. I must confess I should dearly like to be in a place where I could sit and listen two or three nights in a week to first class vocalists and instrumentalists, but that time, I imagine, is not near at hand so I content myself with such 'treats' as we get up among ourselves. There are none here who will not be gratified to hear of your welfare and wherever you go, may wealth and prosperity attend you. Mr. Lord and Mr. Prior (who are by my side) desire to be kindly remembered to you and beg you will accept the united regards of Mrs. Bate and of yours most sincerely

M. Bate.

I expect photographs of Mr. & Mrs. Alport very soon. When they come to hand, I will send one to you.

 

(Page 114)

5 Mar 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I owe you an acknowledgment to two of your kind favors viz: those of the 4th and 19th ultimo. To say that the weather is bad up this way would hardly convey to you a correct idea of the snow falls, and torrents of rain we have been getting. I never remember such a winter during my long residence in the Colony. I truly shall be thankful for some signs of the approach of spring.

The 'Panther' you will learn has been abandoned to her fate, and is to be sold I hear in Victoria.

The Wellington people have been unable to see one or two small demands that have been [made?] upon them lately, and the vessels turned around and came too us, rather to my displeasure, because (Page 115)

we want all our coal - at all events for the next 40 days we shall have none to spare. I have received an enquiry from Steamship Agents in Japan for a cargo of our coal, but of course we can't listen to them. The names of the writers are Hudson, [Malawton?] & Co.

Unhappily, the coal we got at the foot of Fitzwilliam Slope turned out to be an irregular deposit - not the main seam, and we cannot regard it of any value. We continue to sink and must strike it surely by and by. The Bore at South end of Newcastle Island is going down finally: it has reached a depth of 22 fathoms which should be, according to strata pierced, nearly half way to the coal.

May I trouble you to get me another dozen of the Photos of Emily and Alport, and to ask what we can procure copies of the enlarged pictures of Mrs. Bate and myself for? I suppose the negative is preserved and that copies can be readily produced?

The Victoria 'Chamber of Commerce' I see are going in for subsidizing the new China line of steamers to induce them to call at Esquimalt. I am afraid the Government hasn't money enough to offer sufficient inducement.

With best wishes in which Mrs. Bate joins me

I am, yours sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 117) [overwritten]

9 Mar 74

Dear Mother

Your kind letters of November the 3rd and January the 16th we have duly received, and we were glad to learn that you were all well.

We are sorry to hear, however, that work in your part of the world is so frequently obstructed by “strikes”, and by dry [rivers?] etc. It seems a queer place to live in, and we expect you find it so one way and another. Though I suppose if work was carried on regularly, you would be content enough. We expect to start to come and see you before you come this way.

Were it not that we are very busy opening up new works I should try to get leave of (Page 116) absence to visit you this next summer. I expect to be pretty [well pressed?] with business the whole of this year [altogether?]. Sarah Anne says she knows what trouble it must be to you to lose the company of the 'Boys' as you call them, and how hard it will be for you to bear the absence of all the family. She talks about you a great deal and often intimates that perhaps you would be much more comfortable [among?] the old folks at home than being where you are. We hope that you do not want for anything when Joseph and John are out of work. If you need any assistance from us do not fail to let us know. We could never think of allowing you to be without Food or Raiment so long as we have it in our power to help you. We shall [---d you’d?]...

[NOTE: crosswritten across most pages and fading makes reading difficult. Text seems mostly about family matters. Page 118 This page below follows the one which is end of letter.]

(Page 118) ...proud to get the last lot. That of Sarah Anne I know you would prize especially. We are both well as are also the little ones excepting baby who is troubled greatly just now teething. If we have an opportunity, we will get Mark’s portrait taken soon to send to you and the other of our darlings you have not seen.

You may expect dear Mother that we are much changed in features in the many years since we parted from you but considering the industry I have had to display in order to get along as I have, and the trials Sarah Anne has with a somewhat numerous family, we are not very much the worse for many years wear. We have both the bloom of youth on our cheeks, although we are now getting to the age when every year will tell its story of getting old. (Page 117)

Mark and Tommy are robust, romping fellows, full of life and fun and having nothing to do but attend school and learn their lessons. They are growing very fast. Mark and Sarah Ann are at the head of the first class in their schools. If my mind does not change, I shall give Mark about two years at College and Sallie 2 or 3 years at the College Emily went to. As far as Education is concerned, we mean for all the children, if we are spared, to have a good start in life. If it had not been for my good schooling, I should never have stood in the position I do today. We have few thousand dollars on Deposit at interest - four houses, 100 acres of good land and other property - shares in business etc so that you will see we have not squandered (Page116) my earnings. We have not been sparing either. We have had everything we want, kept servants in the house, and spent hundreds of dollars in the various ways a person of any standing is called upon to [--?].

Please to convey to Mary and her husband, Thomas and his wife and Joseph and John our best love. We should like to be favored with photos of Thomas' wife and Mary's husband.

I got a letter from David [Botham?] a week or two ago. He tells me our dear Grandmother is rapidly declining and we suppose, in the nature of things, we shall shortly hear that she has gone the way of all flesh.

In conclusion, dear Mother, we have to ask you to accept the never failing love of

Your affectionate son and daughter

M and S. A. Bate

(Page 118) [overwritten]

...that you speak so highly of Joseph and John and she sincerely hopes as I do that they will be ever mindful of their dear Mother's well-being, and let nothing interfere with the duty they owe to her. You sent us dear Mother, by mistake perhaps, a likeness on leather. Did you not have one or two on paper? If not, probably you can get the one we had taken at Birmingham copied. If you have it safe, and send us a few copies of it. My Mother has sent me a copy of one on glass which I had taken the summer before I left home. Sarah Ann had one taken, also on glass, at the same time and she would much like to get a copy of it. A good artist will have no difficulty in copying a positive picture.

William has written to you at Easter and as we enclose his letter you will learn what he has to say for himself. He is well and getting along nicely. We send you herewith some more photographs. We are not surprised that you were proud to get the last lot ...[NOTE: This page continues previous p.118].

(Page 119)

...Enclosed a photograph of Emily and her husband which Sarah Anne believes you will be highly pleased to get, Both of them are looking very serious and Emily has one of her cat droppers just showing on the left side of her face which rather spoils her features by making the lower part of her cheek look heavier than it really is. She is a dear girl: just the bright eyed blithesome darling that my Sally used to be when her age. God grant that nothing happens to blight the splendid prospect they now have before them. We have not heard from them since they left London, but have no doubt they are safe in South Africa long before this time. As you may imagine, we were much pleased to get the photo of Joseph. He is growing very fast apparently and he looks well. We now want a likeness of John. Sarah Ann is delighted.

[This page continues to page 118 overwritten]

(Page 120)

14 Mar 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

 

Gentlemen

On the 17th of December last, I addressed you respecting a Deed and the Mortgage from Mr. C N Chantrell, which I left at the office of the Register General for Registration.

As I wish to make use of the documents, please to obtain them and forward to me.

Am greatly obliged

Gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 121)

17 Mar 74

My Dear Cousin

I owe you an apology for not writing with more promptitude in acknowledgment of your very kind letter of the 13th of May last. As you expected, I was surprised to hear from you, and I was pained too to hear that my dear Mother was so infirm. It is very good of you doing little things for her, and you will please allow me to say how much I appreciate and admire the kind spirit, which actuated you in considering the wants of one who is no doubt fast becoming weak and almost helpless. The life of my dear good Mother for 20 years and upwards has been a most trying one. How much I long to see her I cannot begin to tell you, but as I am unable to leave here to visit England yet awhile I shall do everything possible to provide her a comfortable house, as far as the necessaries of life can do so. I have sent her several sums of money since I received your letter and shall not fail to remit often so long as I have means to support her. I sincerely trust that she (Page 122) does not want for any thing. I can well understand, my dear cousin, that with advancing age my dear Mother will not study appearances or dress very much and while I should greatly like her to always look respectable and be kept tidy, I am still more anxious that she should be warmly clothed and that her health should be considered - should have first attention. I know also that, as you intimate, it is awkward for you to take too prominent an interest in my dear Mother’s well being, owing to the somewhat crotchety ways of father-in-law. I earnestly hope, however, that he has long ere this time given over his drinking fits and that he is living a better life than he did when I was at Home. I will enclose in this half a sovereign which I shall feel obliged by your expending in such a manner as you think best for Mother's special benefit or, if you prefer you may hand the money to her. Do which way you chose.

I was very sorry to hear of George's illness and I hope he has quite got over it, and that no permanent injury to his health has resulted from the severe attack he had. In a note I recently received, Mother tells me that my Uncle George was at Holly Hall. If he is there when you get this, kindly remember me and Mrs. Bate to him. We beg you will also convey our love to your dear Father, Brothers and Sister, likewise to my dear Mother. I am glad to say we are all quite well. You no doubt hear from Cornelius often.

Accept for yourself dear cousin the best love of Mrs. Bate and of

Yours very affectionately

M. Bate

 

(Page 123)

23 March 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

Accept my best thanks for yours of the 21st instant and for the kindness you evince in affording me desirable information. May I now ask you what lawyer has the matter in hand? I have an idea that the Cornishmen and Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are after Mr. Rippon's land, and I intend to take a look at it with a view of purchasing myself. This intelligence please treat as strictly confidential.

I shall be glad to see you at Nanaimo to talk over the scheme I have on foot, and, in the meantime, if you can succeed at the expense of $20 or $25, to the Lawyer in getting the sale and the advertisement of it postponed, be good enough to do so, and I will pay the amount named.

Pray do not under any circumstance mention my name in this matter, but give me all the good advice you can and believe me

Yours very truly

M. Bate

N. Shakespeare Esq.
Victoria

 

(Page 124)

18 Mar 74

My Dear Aunt

I have delayed replying to you longer than I ought to have done in answer to your very kind and welcome letter of the 2nd May last. Of late, I am kept so tightly pressed and so fully occupied at my office desk that I am sadly neglecting the letters of my friends at home, and my private correspondence generally. A short note now and then I manage to scrawl out to my dear Mother to whom I owe first attention, and I cannot neglect or forget. It is not in my nature to show the slightest disregard of her to whom I owe so much. You, my dear Aunt, can hardly conceive the bad news your letter contained had upon me. For some days I felt completely unnerved [sic]. Of course it is not in the nature of things that my dear Mother should be permitted to remain any great length of time in this world. A few short years [-] and then her earthly career must end, and whenever I pray to God, she may be ushered into the Realms of Eternal Bliss. When I think about her- of the [dreary?] hard life she had endured within my recollection, and the noble manner in which she had borne all the trials and of the [--] (Page 125) she made in my early life on my behalf I feel too full to speak - my heart yearns to embrace her and I gladly give all worldly goods I possess to be afforded an opportunity to do so. The demands of our family and the unending nature of my business engagement precludes almost the possibility of any visiting England yet awhile; but I earnestly hope my dear Mother may be spared till I can see her. To you, dear Aunt, I feel especially thankful for your infinite goodness in giving me [--] as to my Mother's state of health. You rightly supposed that I am anxious to hear often of her condition at the same time I am pained to know how rapidly she is declining. I am very grateful to you also for the information you give that she would not be allowed to want for anything. Since I received your letter, I have sent several sums of money to my dear Mother direct. I have thought that so long as she is capable of managing her house affairs, I had better make remittances to her and so avoid any unpleasantness that might perhaps arise between father-in-law and others who have any connection with my Mother in money matters. Quite sure I am that my kind cousins [either] Aunt Bryant would look to my dear Mother's wants, and discreetly and properly expend for her advantage any sums of money with which she may be entrusted. Anything that is required for the health and comfort of my aged Mother I will provide. I have means, thank God, to maintain her and I shall ever feel [---] of the attention

(page 125) of those dear friends who may apprise me of my Mother's needs, and who may assist and to smooth her pillow of her declining years. I sent her 5 pounds in Oct. and 5 pounds last month and I forward half a sovereign occasionally.

I am still doing well in the old post and have 750 pounds a year, a good house and fuel grants, and notwithstanding the demands made upon me for the education of the children etc., I am by frugality and steadiness gradually saving a little money and endeavouring to lay a foundation for our children to build upon in the far off and unknown future. Need I say how thankful we are to the Great Being who is merciful and bountifully shown us to Him alone do we owe praise, prayer and thanksgiving for his goodness.

My Mark will be [14?] years old in May [next?] and on his birthday, I shall present him with 50 pounds for deposit in the Saving Bank at 5% per annum Interest. By the time he is 21, it will amount to a nice little sum.

All our darlings are well and Sarah Ann and myself. Elizabeth and her husband and family are also well, as are Lucy and her husband. A few months ago, we were at Victoria for a visit and enjoyed considerably of Aunt Maria's company. We expect her to spend next week or two with us. She talks of visiting England this year, but I don't know if her mind is fully made up.

(Page 124)

We sincerely hope that my Uncle Joseph and yourself are quite well, and perhaps my dear Uncle and Aunt, you will permit my to say that I should be glad to hear of your retirement from business. I know full well the harassing character of most business exercise----of whatever class, and I can tell from some years experience of the great anxiety of mind from one cause or other that attend the fastidious management of even small establishments -You can imagine what my responsibilities are when I mention that the Company whose office here I control pay away in wages $20,000 a month. Our workmen earn large wages. I believe there is not a better place in the world for a coal miner than Nanaimo.

Asking you, my dear Aunt, to give me best love and Sarah Ann's to my dear Mother -, to all relatives and inquiring friends, and begging you and my dear Uncle to accept the same.

I remain

your ever affectionate nephew.

M. Bate

 

(Page 126)

PRIVATE

. 2nd April 74

My dear Mr. Wild

I hasten to acknowledge the receipt of your kind letter of the 18th February for which I beg you will accept my best thanks. We have not yet heard of the arrival of Alport and his wife at the Cape, but I am expecting a letter from them very soon. Long letters have been sent to them from us, and I hope and believe they will draw comfort from the news we have forwarded.

As an encouragement to Mr. Bryden, I quite often referred to him, when we are talking over matters connected with the work that the Directors would be interested and please to get intelligence from him on the particular subject we might have under consideration, and I intimate that his views and language touching the mines etc would be more comprehensive and clear than the somewhat curtailed remarks I am enabled to offer. More certainly, as you imply, is no excuse now Mr. Prior is here, nor any reason that I am aware of why Mr. Bryden should not do his duty with respect to correspondence, and I trust the Board in the future will hear from him often. I should occasionally, perhaps, say more concerning the mines were it not that I wish to guard against giving any opinion which might clash with those of my colleague who, at times, is a dreadful long while making up his mind, and I am not always informed promptly of what he proposes to do.

(Page 127) Referring to the clearance of the No 4 level I may say that Mr. Bryden has maintained that by far the greatest and worst part of road is cleared of mud, and as I have stated in official letters, I think, a number of men are now mining along that level, but as the No 5 advances there will be less need, I should imagine, for taking out more of the debris than was in the case a month or two ago. I see this connection I might add that the day before yesterday I went through the Douglas mine, took a peep at the No1 level which cannot continue to turn out coal much longer, went down the pitch and closely examined the workings at the foot of B Slope, and I believe I am correct in saying that in no other part of the old mine have we ever had the seam so thick and at the same time as good as it is exposed in the No 5 level. The roof and pavement- which are the wider, of course, where the seam is perpendicular or nearly so- have "rolls" here and there and the coal has a thickness of 5 1/2 feet to 9 feet, accordingly as the sides are bulged or fall back. The Heading coming from the Pitch towards B Slope looks very bad at the back, the coal being pushed out. In places, however, good coal has been cut into and passed. Owing to the negligence of one of the pump tenders, the water has been allowed to rise in the Pitch and we have not been able to get coal there from for a week. The Plunger, which is covered, is out of order, so we have to put in another pump, or get the water down by winding with a box or tank.

As to Fitzwilliam slope, it is the almost certainty that the place of the coal (Page 128) being followed that encourages us to persevere with the sinking at present dimensions barely 9X5 feet. The 50-yard contract called for a slope 9 X 6, but as you will be aware the contractors failed to carry out the job they undertook. There is just a possibility of Fitzwilliam coal being above or below the drift we are working. Still, seeing that a small seam of coal and shale has kept its place in the floor for more than 300 yards, the probability is that the seam proper is wanting, and I am at times disposed to imagine from seeing specks in the stone we are cutting into, that the coal by some agency was dissipated and mixed with the matter before a substantial covering was formed.

When Mr. Rosenfeld was here, I talked to him about Freights, and many other matters bearing upon the business, and he did not deny that the Company would be (Page 129) better off with a ship or two of its own- particularly if regular sales could be depended upon. He said, speaking of the price of coal, that we were getting quite as high a figure as other equally good if not better coals fetched, and perhaps he is right in that remark. Still with higher freights and an increased commission on the cargoes going to Mexico etc. we are not obtaining the net returns we did some time ago. Then look at the 'Prince Alfred'- at the concessions made to her. We are giving that steamer 100 pounds a month off our reduced price of $5.50!

I have watched with regret the withdrawal of cash from the "Reserves" and am very desirous of seeing money go forward to head office.

The Wellington folks, I apprehend, are doing first rate. It is a fact, I believe, that they get 5.50 for all their San Francisco shipments, and here they have had a great advantage of us. When I spoke of contracts (Page 128) in my official letters of [7th January?] last, I wished to be understood to state that, to settle the question of [-] the Board might prevail on Mr. Rosenfeld to purchase on his own account at 5.50 or 5.25 per ton at the mine

In all negotiations about Harewood, I shall bear in mind your advice. The view at the [-] tell me they have got nothing worth speaking of as yet.

The Union Company of Comox hold to their own terms. One or two of the shareholders say positively they will not sell under $55,000. The government does not allow more than [1000?] acres to be taken by the Union Co. which are to be chosen out of the 2000 as are reserved for them to explore upon, and they are now having the [land?] selected surveyed in order to get the Crown grant. I will lose not a moment to see what I can do. Tomorrow. I will tell Gillespie [?.overwritten & faint] (Page 129) acquire this land will have it in their power to greatly extend and enlarge their works and trade which will probably do as much harm than good. I have not spoken to Mr. Bryden on this subject at present for reasons that you no doubt understand. If the Board do not desire to bid, it will be as well that Dunsmuir etc. should not know such a move was contemplated. Of this, I feel confident if the line shown to me is the East and West Boundary line of Rippon's property be correct then it is my fixed opinion that the Estate which is to be sold contains more if the Wellington Coal than does that of Dunsmuir Diggle & Co. I believe I should be fully justified in going...

(Page 128) ...the [?] named in my official letter of today for the [?] acres- I mean to say that it would certainly be a good investment for the Company and should feel very glad if instructed to bid for it. I have not mentioned in my official letter that while going over the [?] belonging to Nicholas and Frances. The former told me they had written to Mr. Bermingham about the coal under their farm. (He does not know Bermingham is associated with our Agent in any way and he says B wrote in reply that if they would have a trail cut along their lines so that he could walk around he would come up and inspect it at his own expense? What can Bermingham be up to?

I will write again next week. In the meantime

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild, yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 130)

6 April 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have to thank you for your kind favours of the 19th and 20th ultimo. Mr. Berryman has not reached this far. I hear he has been advised to stay in Victoria a little while, because up to last week, the Comox country was buried with snow.

You will do me a good kindness by ordering another picture each of myself and Mrs. Bate on Mr. Hall's terms, and please have them framed like that of Emily. There is rather too much of a curl in my eyebrow in the picture we have. I don't know how it got there, but it is not so apparent in the “original.” Perhaps Mr. Hall can straighten the curl a little? The pictures we have we intend to send to Emily and Alport, who you will be glad to know are safe at Beaufort. I have not heard from them directly, but am expecting a letter every day. We may want another (Page 131) couple of pictures by and by for my brother.

Have great hopes of Fitzwilliam mine yet. It will surely "pan out" before long. My first impression of the [vent?] at the bottom of the slope was that it may be somewhat extensive and it may not. We continue to cut into it gradually, though slowly, and have fortunately the soft [-?] still to pick out.

As you may suppose, I was very sorry to hear of the bad state of the 'Arkwright’s' last cargo. Capt. Black, while loading, spoke of its looking bad and I ,as often as I could, went to the bin to see to the screening. The coal, however, was so wet from snow and rain that it was a very difficult matter to free it of dross as we could if dry. It is to be hoped annoyances from complaints on this score are over- at all events for the season.

I quite concur in your remarks touching the probable success of the English China line of steamers. The movements of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce are too absurd to merit attention from such steamers anyhow. Dunsmuir says Bichard says he wants to get more coal to supply the China boats, but he (Dunsmuir) observes it is impossible for him to get it out. We had a big months shipment in March- 6000 tons and over. Quite a number of small craft and steamers are popping to the wharves, much to my displeasure. While we have large ships loading I wish the coasters would keep off. The 'Shooting Star' is staying with you longer than usual. No news of her [--?] has come to hand. I shall be glad when she arrives with the Powder, Hay, steam winch etc.

Please send me Bills of Pictures and I will promptly remit.

Hoping you are well, with most kind regards to you and Mrs. Rosenfeld, in which Mrs. Bate joins.

Believe me

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 132)

8th April 74

Dear Mr. Wild

Last week I wrote to you and I have now the pleasure to own the receipt of your kind note of the 28th February, As far as I can learn from what I have heard I am inclined to think Bulkley and his friends have bought the Harewood Estate out and out. Egerton and Spalding have been to the prospecting tunnel to see, I suppose, how the work is progressing and to note the character of the seam. Bulkley is to have a house erected somewhere up this way, and Mrs. Spalding told Mrs. Bate that he and his family [--?] to reside among us towards the end of [---?].

As you say, it is merely suspected Ward is in partnership with Bulkley, although I was told before Ward wrote to me that he had no interest in the concern, but what made me imagine, as I do still, that some of the firm of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are also associated with Mr. Bulkley was the fact of the two parties traveling around together so very much, and now, observing that the Harewood men we paid at the same [shop? slips?] as the Wellington, and that supplies for the mines are furnished at the same place that I think is evidence, more or less, of the connection. Bulkley, I trust, will not fail to call at St. Mildred’s Court and make known his intentions and wishes with regard to land for his proposed road. I have written to Dr. Ash on the subject of an offer of his Beaufort claim, and have spoken to Gillespie, (Page 133) who is our Overman at Fitzwilliam mine, and have written to Capt. Clarke of the stmr “Sir James Douglas”, respecting the Union claim. Gillespie promised to talk to others of the Union company with regard to selling at about $30,000 and for himself expresses a willingness to sell to me (for the company) his own interest (1/11) for $2750.00. He will use all the influence he can bring to bear to get an offer made that will be acceptable to our Company. He tells me there are three different parties inquiring after the Union. One backed by Mr. Finlayson of Victoria, another belonging to San Francisco the agent of which is now in Victoria, and Mr. J H Turner (of Turner Beeton & Tunstall) I understand to be the third party.

Of course, in speaking to Gillespie, I took care not to appear at all importunate though I told him the sooner he moved in the matter the sooner he would be likely to turn his shares into cash. I shall follow him up cautiously till it is known if the balance of the shareholders will agree with Gillespie or if we can get an offer from them on anything like reasonable terms. Mr. Bermingham wrote me a note, by last trip of 'Prince Alfred” which only reached me this morning. It must have been given into private hands, and not promptly mailed. The note read thus: There is one Berryman going up in the 'Prince Alfred' I presume to look after the Baynes Sound Property. He is the agent of one of the Coos Bay mines. Should he pay you a visit, be reticent with him. You may do well perhaps, to inform him the Harewood mine is going to be opened. I think he is connected with Phelan who went up to Baynes Sound last year. Mr. Berryman is the “agent” asking about the Union Mine and the Baynes Sound also. Could not something be done about the latter with Mr. Pemberton in London? It is admitted (Page 134) Baynes Sound, as you will perceive by reference to a chart, is the best place for shipping of any of the Comox coal claims...

If I am not mistaken, Mr. Bulkley will have his hands full with Harewood, and may let Comox alone for a while, and now, as you rightly intimate, is our chance. My only fear is that the Union Shareholders as a whole will not be induced or disposed to ask less than the sum they have named before vis. $55,000. I shall work upon Capt. Clarke, who I am certain wants money, and with Gillespie’s cooperation we may do something with the rest shortly. It is in order to keep the first place as a coal mining Company that I wish to see the Board take hold of what, it is generally admitted, as the best coal field on the Island, I mean Comox, and I am equally desirous that we should get the 100 acres of land in Mountain district to which I referred last week. I don't imagine our neighbours will let the section go without a struggle, because without it their mines will soon be exhausted. I shall wait in anxious suspense for instructions from the Board as to whether I shall try to buy the 100 acres or not, I hardly think we should show any great consideration for Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co who did not hesitate to jump alongside our line, near Departure Bay!

Prior has done us a good service in the survey of part of Douglas Pit. He [judged? found?] the No 4 level is not so near the Harbour- not so far East- by about 2 chains as represented by Mr. Bryden's survey, so that we have that much more ground between the shaft and the Reserve and the sea than we had reckoned upon, and we must have a good lot of coal below us. The No 4 level not being so far to the dip as supposed, might have led to getting too near the swamp!

The miners this month seem to be "playing off". They have never before had such an Easter holiday as they are taking this year. Having no coal in stock to speak of and a large ship at the wharf, I am getting uneasy to see all the men at their stalls,

I will write you soon, In the meantime

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 135)

15 April 74

Confidential

My Dear Clarke

Your figure is too high for us; and I think it is very doubtful if Colonel Houghton will succeed in finding a purchaser at $55,000.00. He might. You will make a good thing if he does. Suppose he should fail I can get, I believe, $33,000.00 for the whole property and I don't imagine our people will give more. Ours, in any case, would be a bone fide transaction while it is highly probable others may be only trifling or depending upon a third party.

With best wishes and hoping you and yours are well.

I am, yours very sincerely

M. Bate

15 April 74

N. Shakespeare, Esq.
Victoria

My Dear Sir:

In reply to your favor of the 13th inst I beg to state that a lease of a plot of ground will be given you, if you desire it, in the location you name at, say, $3.00 per month. The size of the plot to be 40x20 feet- that is 20 feet on Front street and 40 ft towards the water.

Hoping the above arrangement may suit you.

I am yours very truly

for the Company

M. Bate

 

(Page 136)

15 April 74

Dear Mr. Wild

As I have mentioned and explained in my official letter of today, negotiations with the Union Company have for the present suddenly terminated. Under date of the 6th inst. Capt Clarke wrote to me a private note, in reply to my letter to him, in which he stated "with regard to the Union claims. There are three different parties who wish to buy. A bond has been given to Colonel Houghton. Fifty five thousand dollars is the price we are to get, and it is nearly certain the mine will be opened this summer". I very much fear we shall not succeed in getting our offer at a less price than the Union folks have already fixed upon, i.e. in the event of Col Houghton not purchasing which is by no means unlikely as he is acting for the parties named in my official letter. In the meantime, I am urging my colleague to go to Comox for a few days to look over the Union Claims and the ground, not taken up, bordering upon that Claim so that we can speak with more confidence and as to the real character and value of the land. Baynes Sound Claim it seems is "bonded" too. A note to me from Mr. Bermingham written on the 5th inst states "One Berryman went up to Victoria by the last steamer and got the refusal of the Baynes Sound mines for 60 days at, I believe, $60,000,00. He returned by the same steamer and has tried to sell here. Some of Mr. Rosenfeld's friends were approached. They would not have anything to do with it unless Mr. R. was consulted and so told Berryman who informed them that Mr. Rosenfeld would be likely to report favorably upon it as he (Page 137)

was interested with the Vancouver Coal Co.

They told him that they would abide by Mr. R's advice, and accordingly sent for him. Of course, he advised them not to have anything to do with it as he once owned control of it and was glad to get out of it, so they will have nothing to do with it. Berryman will have to try elsewhere. It was he who got Phelan to go up last year on the strength of Landale's reports. That poor Baynes Sound concern has been hawked all over Europe and America in search of a purchaser and has always been doomed to disappointment. Pemberton must be eating it up in interest!

I am glad to note from the above that Rosenfeld has given Mr. Berryman the cold shoulder. Rosenfeld, by all accounts, has considerable influence in some directions. If Mr. Bryden goes up to Comox, it will be well for him to spend a day at Baynes Sound. A road has been cut and some tunnels driven since we were there 10 years ago. Baynes Sound outcrops, in a direct line, are about 2 1/2 miles from the beach. Suppose Colonel Houghton does not conclude the purchase of the Union claim what would you think of my getting the refusal of it for 3 or 4 months on the best terms I can? It strikes me that the parties looking after the Union and Baynes Sound might be trying to keep the Claims totally in their hands till the Canadian Pacific Railway policy is known.

The first issue of the “Nanaimo Free Press” newspaper came out this morning. I sent copies to Mr. Robins. I was surprised to notice that the Wellington mine sent away figures 7300 tons of coal in the first 3 months of this year. Our neighbours have a fine, thick seam and I hope we may yet get a patch of it. The Estates of the late [N?] Rippon, which I have before somewhat fully alluded to, we ought to get hold of, and go boldly to work alongside Dunsmuir, Diggle and Co. Dunsmuir told me yesterday that Harewood is looking very bad but, he said "It would be better for the place if Harewood is worked rather than Comox, and should be started. Don’t you think so?” Of course I agreed.

I must now close, Col. Houghton having just popped into the office.

With kind regards, believe me

Dear Mr. Wild

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate.

(Page 138)

April 21, 1874

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Please accept our best thanks for the photo of Emily and Alport, which came safely to hand. I will include the amount of the Bill for them in the cheque I shall have to send you for the large pictures.

I was greatly interested by the particulars you gave me in your favor of 5th inst., of Berryman's movements, and exceedingly pleased to find that he was given the “cold shoulder” by Mr. Rosenfeld and his friends. Landale's reports, as far as I have had occasion to look into them, all seem to have been made to order, manufactured expressly for certain purposes. There is this much to be said about Baynes Sound and the other Comox coal claims: They have, none of them, ever been proved in any way - no Bores, no drifts (except a mere cutting to expose the crop.) and with such varying sections as are obtained at the different places. It may reasonably concluded that (Page 139) the regular continuity of the coal measures is very problematic to say the least. Before saying much of that section of the Island, more must be known about it. The pseudo Geologists are always leading folk astray.

Fitzwilliam mine has indeed been a disappointment, but who knows or can tell, what exists in a place we can't see? It may be we have a good thick coal ahead to make up for the nip and want. At all events we are pushing the slope in the position and direction we trust to find the Coal, and we are about to put some bore holes overhead and underfoot to aid in the search. Success, I sincerely hope, will ere long crown our efforts.

Our miners are rapidly dropping off. Those remaining seem to take it easy, and do not care at all for work. They are not many of them making more than half time. We are completely fettered by the lack of industry which is now becoming manifest among the miners. Quite a number seem undecided whether to work or not. A very little persuasion would [carry? easy?] sway a lot more to the diggings.

The Engine sent us is just the thing. We shall find it very useful either for hoisting ballast, or for driving our Boring machine. We have lovely weather - warm days and sunshiny. More like July than April. At the bottom of Fitzwilliam Slope where we are looking for the coal, we have not a drop of water. Everything is very dry.

Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and of yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 140)

29 April 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

I enclose a cheque for $30.00 Interest on Masonic Loan Note to 3rd inst. We will always pay from here.

It is much to be regretted that the Church Income as represented in the Annual Report of the D.C.S. is falling off. We sadly need someone here to assist in the work among the Indians. Mr. Reynard has been very ill for more than three weeks. He is better just now though he is very weak and looks unable to do much.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

N.C. Ward Esq.

 

(Page 141)

4 May 74

My dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind note of the 18th duly came to hand. Please accept our best thanks for your attention to the Pictures. I wish we could get good ones up this way: then we should not be giving you so much trouble.

The unfavourable state of the Coal Market won’t help Baynes Sound just now. It is generally when coal is in great request that Gaston & Co. make an attempt to raise the wind. So certain are the interested ones at Victoria that Berryman will succeed in his object that they consider their claim as good as sold. So says a private note to me.

Whatever Dunsmuir says Bichard says I always receive with considerable allowance. The latter gentleman particularly has not the best of reputations for truthfulness. He keeps the Wellington Mine going - the wharf always occupied, so that small craft come to us when we don't want them (Page 142). I am always pleased when I see a good passenger and freight list per 'Prince Alfred', and I never fail to watch her movements.

The Victoria “Chamber of Commerce” I observe wants the Contract with the Prince abrogated. Of course, you are aware that there are one or two of the Baynes Sound Shareholders prominent members of the Chamber. They probably want to improve their chances to sell. You will surely make a first class vessel of the 'Prince Alfred' when new boilers and compound Engines are put on board. I shall be very sorry to hear Mr. Rosenfeld being a sufferer by the unfortunate position of the Pacific Mail Steamship Co. and I hope a financial crash or a partial failure even to meet liabilities will be averted. To keep them afloat, that Company seems to want at the time general support and good management.

If the Bellingham Bay Co sent away some of their men. we may get a few of them and we want them badly now. The 'Otter' coaled today and 12 persons have engaged a passage to Stikine by next trip of that steamer. Nearly all the men have the fever. Fitzwilliam mine is almost deserted. Some of the fellows will be coming back before long I expect.

We have a glorious continuation of fine weather. I shall watch anxiously for Mr. Rosenfeld by the 'Prince Alfred'. He will find the place has an altogether different garb to what he saw on his former visit. Harewood tunnel is turning out very badly. Bulkley will be sadly beside the mark in his calculation of the output of coal. He counted upon 4 tons to every yard of tunnel. The contractors are in 140 yards - have turned out 12 tons of coal, and expended between 3000 - and 4000 - dollars. The prospect might improve as the men advance. If not they may probably explore in some other quarter. They have a large Estate though only a small portion of it is Coal bearing.

Mrs. Bate as well as myself is very sorry to hear of the illness of Mrs. Bermingham. I hope it will only be temporary, and that ere this she has quite recovered.

With best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself

Believe me I remain

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 143)

6 May 1874

PRIVATE

Nanaimo

My Dear Clarke

I hasten to own the receipt of your note of the 4th instant. Your settling little coal Bill next week will be all right. Pay into the Bank B.C. if you think proper.

It would please me rather than otherwise to hear of your getting 5000.00 or more for your shares in the Union mine, but I have grave doubts that the money will be forthcoming. I may tell you strictly in confidence that I have recommended our Company to give as much as $33,000.00 for the Union property, and that amount I have no hesitation in saying I can obtain, providing title and everything else is found satisfactory on examination. If I could get a bonus for you by your interesting yourself in having a sale affected to me I would do so, and probably should succeed.

I suppose you can do nothing until it is seen if Col. Houghton will come to terms? Pray keep the matter to yourself. If you can post me in any way to assist you at the same time coming to the figures (about) that I have named I shall speedily take steps to come to an arrangement.

Got letters from Emily and Alport last night. They have rec'd your letter of the 2nd of December and Alport says he is writing to you and sending some papers for me to look at.

How are you getting along? I often ask about you.

With best wishes, believe me

Yours sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 144)

6 May 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

Will you please allow me to state, through the medium of the Colonist that when writing to you on the 7th Feb'y last with reference to Texada Iron ore I merely, as you will recollect, enquired for information as to the ownership of the Claims, that were, as I was advised, "on the London Market".

My words were: "I hear from London that Mr. Sproat, the agent general of British Columbia, is offering for sale Texada Iron Ore claims. Do you know on whose account? I should like to ascertain".

When Mr. DeCosmos was here in Feb'y I spoke to him on the subject of Texada Island, and understood him to say he had no share in the Iron Ore claims. He added, however, that it would be a great thing for the country if the Ore could be utilized and Capital obtained for that purpose. Of course, I agreed with him.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 145)

6 May 1874

Nanaimo

D. N. Higgins Esq.

My Dear Mr. Higgins

Please do me the favor of publishing the enclosed in the 'Colonist'. I have particular reasons for making the request, which I cannot here explain.

I think I told you it was our secretary who wrote to me re Texada Island. In a week or two hence, I expect to visit Victoria, when I shall not fail to call on you.

With kind regards to Mr. Robson and yourself.

I am, yours very sincerely

M. Bate

13 May 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Mr. Higgins

I am much obliged for your favor of the 11th inst. If you have no particular objection, publish the note I sent last week for insertion in the Colonist, and by all means, if you wish, leave out the last sentence. I am sorry, in some respects, that it was necessary to use the information I got from London, but I don’t suppose the Secretary will feel much annoyed about the matters. I hope not.

Please ask Mr. Robson to accept my thanks for his kind present “Statutes of 1874” and believe me I remain

yours most truly in haste

M. Bate

 

(Page 146)

9 May 74

My dear Mother

I last wrote to you on the 24th February ultimo, and I have heard nothing from Home since that time. I am expecting answers to letters I wrote to my cousin William Bate, Thomas Hughes, David [Botham?] and an old friend of mine David Pearce, but I might be kept in expectation some weeks perhaps.

You will be glad to know that Emily and her husband have arrived safe in Beaufort West Cape of Good Hope, and are quite well. We got letters from them three days ago. Before many years have passed, I imagine Emily’s husband will occupy a very important position at the place they now are. The Prime Minister of the Cape colony is a brother -in -law of the uncle they have gone to, and both those gentlemen are wealthy and influential. I know Charlie (Emily’s husband) will do everything possible to merit preferment. His position, which now is a good one, will bring increasing advantages and involvements for two or three (Page 147) years for certain, and after that he will be, comparatively speaking, independent. We received letters from Elizabeth and her husband the other day. They tell me they have written to you and to my dear aunt Lucy Grainger. They are all well and so are Lucy and her husband. I am pleased to tell you that myself Sarah Ann and all the little ones are well too. The 17th of the month is Mark’s birthday- 14th. And when it comes he will get from me a present of 50 pounds for deposit in the Savings Bank. He is a good Boy, and attends regularly and faithfully to his school duties. I shall give him schooling till he is about 17 years old if all is well. Six of our darlings are now going to school. Aunt Maria from whom I had a letter last week is pretty well. She does not mention anything about going Home. Please give my love and Sarah Ann’s to all our relatives and kindly remember us to all friends. I suppose I must give up all hope of hearing directly from my Uncle John [----] or Frank [Read?]. How is Richard Hancox getting on? Where are the Webbs who used to live near you? There are not many of the old friends still living out [Holly Hall?] I expect. They have removed probably to other parts. I hope, my dear Mother, you are improving in health, and that when you feel unwell every care is taken of you and every attention paid to you. I send enclosed half a sovereign. And in a week or two, I shall send you a larger amount.

Accept dear Mother for yourself and father-in-law the never failing love of Sarah Anne and your affectionate son

M Bate

(Page 148)

14 May 1874

PRIVATE

Nanaimo,

My Dear Clarke,

I am very much obliged for your kind favor of the 12th inst. Rely upon my endeavoring to get for you all you named in your note of last week, if you can manage to get a proposal on the terms (or rather at the figure) I gave you. A bonus of one or two hundred pounds will be neither here nor there and I should recommend its being given as you mention. I do not suppose for a moment Col. Houghton will do anything and I think you might prepare accordingly - but cautiously and secretly. I shall probably be in Victoria in the course of the next two to three weeks when we can talk quietly about this business.

I have a fearful lot of writing on hand today and am therefore obliged to curtail my remarks. Before I get through tonight I shall have done one of Alport’s shifts from sunrise to sunset.

Please find Mr. Nicols’ address enclosed. I get a number of slips printed for newspaper wrappers.

Accept united regards of Mrs. Bate and myself for yourself and Mrs. Clarke and believe me

most sincerely yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 149)

20 May 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I duly received your kind favour of the 4th inst. Harewood, unfortunately for Mr. Bulkley, is turning out very badly indeed, so far. He was here last week, and the very last day he was at his mine the men met with a face of coal 4 feet thick, and so elated was Mr. Bulkley that he treated his hands with a barrel of beer, but the same day he took his departure to Victoria the coal cut out, and there has been none found since. What bit of coal the men have come across appears in large nodular pieces - boulders. By perseverance something better may be discovered.

There is no change in our Fitzwilliam slope. (Page 150) The rocks below the position proper of the Coal are as regularly stratified in the slope as they are on the surface. The fault is what I at first took it to be. I believe there is a clear want of the coal. We are driving ahead though not very fast for want of men.

Miners are expected by the hundreds on the return of the ‘California’ and ‘Otter’ I was much disappointed to find Mr. Rosenfeld changed his mind about coming up. We had lots of coal for the ‘Prince’ and as you will see by my official letter, we have now fully 2000 tons on hand at the two mines. Austin had perhaps better come to this harbor on his return. Then if there is not quite coal enough, we could give him stiffening here and tow him to Newcastle. (If he has not a fair wind) at company’s expense.

It is rumoured up this way that Baynes Sound claims is sold at San Francisco! And that the Pacific Mail Steamship Company have an interest in it. I hardly think the report can be true.

We got long letters from Alport and Emily last [-------?] They are all well and wish to be most kindly remembered to you and Mrs. Bermingham. Emily gives a most interesting account of her new Home.

Accept kind regards of myself and Mrs. Bate

and believe me to be yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 151)

20 May 1874

Nanaimo

My dear Clarke

I am duly in receipt of your favor of the 19th. A paragraph appears in the Nanaimo paper referring to your shabby treatment by the Dominion Government. Perhaps if you mention it to them, both the Colonist and Standard will republish it? A letter cool, dignified remonstrating will perhaps be best, do most good, at first, if not in the end, but the matter shan’t drop if it is not attended to. By next opportunity, I will send a little stronger dose to the Colonist in the shape of a letter, and will get further reference made to the business in our paper here. I may tell you (privately, of course) the editor sticks in all I give him.

You will have to be wary with [Hamilton?]. They have the most extravagant ideas about the [--] but will likely get tired of speculating if Col. Houghton does not [-?] down with the [-?].

With best wishes and regards.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 152)

20th April 1874

Nanaimo

My dear Sir

I duly received your kind favor of the 18th inst and I am exceedingly obliged to you for it. I hope you will prosper in your new business, and whenever I come to Victoria I shall not fail to call at your new shop.

I will try and find out who Mr. Drake is acting for. If you think he will do right by the heir of poor Mr. Rippon, there will be no harm in giving him (if his object is to get a public sale) any information you think proper. Did the papers say anything about a preemption claim? I mean the papers you had of Mr. Rippon’s.

N. Shakespeare, Esq.

I would say this: if you can get the business and the papers out of Johnson’s hands act upon Drake’s advice and do so, and then keep the matter in suspense a reasonable time at all events, to see if anything can be heard of the Rippon’s friends. Of course, you need not say you are trying to find them out but say you would like to hear from them. Messrs Drake and Jackson are our legal advisers but I have never hinted anything to them about the matter I am referring to. It might be worthwhile, in any case, to see if they would look after the business in the interest of the friends of the late Mr. Rippon. If anything more turns up please let me hear from you- or if you hear who Mr. Drake is acting for kindly drop me a line.

And greatly oblige - yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page153).

27th May 74

Nanaimo

C. Thorne Esq.
[?] Victoria
 

Dear Sir

Your favor of the 25th inst covering the sum of [?] five dollars in notes is duly to hand. Enclosed please find the requisite receipt.

Mr. Young, who is Sec’try of our Building Association, was requested by the committee to write to you, (officially of course) on the subject of the Lease, and in reply to your letter respecting it. However, I have no doubt the gentleman to whom you have made the transfer will be acceptable to the committee, and thus the object you have desired will probably be accomplished - i.e. your release from the agreement. I think you have taken the right course and with best wishes.

I remain

yours very truly and fraternally

M. Bate

(Page 154)

28 May 74

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

Yours of the 25th inst covering Lease for endorsement of transfer is to hand. The committee meet this evening to consider the matter, and I doubt not Mr. Eckstein will be thought a suitable tenant and assent to the transfer accordingly. Mr. [-?] is now here, and I have reason to believe that the Hall will be ready for Consecration on the 24th of June. I see nothing to prevent it.

With best wishes I am

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 155)

29 May 1874

Nanaimo

My dear Clarke

The papers I think are adopting the wisest course in not striking the Dominion Government too hard, on your behalf, for the present; hence I do not send the promised letter which I had made rather strong. Surely something will be done for you. The fellows who have done nothing hardly but receive pay get a pension, don’t they? When I can do anything you have only to [?]. To keep your correspondence ‘under the rose’ I keep from the Post Office, and send by private hands and perhaps it will be well for me to continue to do so. Your letters perhaps may not be noticed among the dozens of others that I get. Suppose Mrs. Clarke was to address the envelopes you send to me? It will be well for you, perhaps, not to be too pressing with the Union boys- simply evince great anxiety to sell. I should visit Victoria if I could see a way of getting back with one days stay there.

With best wishes

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 156)

30 May 1874

Mr. John Hunter

Nanaimo

Sir,

You are hereby notified to quit and surrender by the 30th day of June next the House and premises you now occupy belonging to me.

I have also to remind you that 14 months rent are owing to me.

Yours truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 157)

1st June 74

My dear Mr. Wild

I hear Dr [Yugo?] is about to visit London again, and he may be the bearer of a Power of Attorney or Commission from Dr Ash to deal with his Beaufort Property: should [Yugo?] call at St. Mildred’s Court, the Board will no doubt go into business with him if he has anything to submit respecting the Perseverance or Beaufort Coal claims.

Dr. Ash takes a long time about replying to my last note to him wherein I asked his terms and for an opportunity of referring to the Board. It seems to me, from his first note, that he wants an offer from us! Bryden was to have gone to Comox last week to thoroughly examine the ground. Outcrops etc. right through from the Baynes Sound to the Union claim, but when the steamer left he was not ready, for some reason or other that I don’t know. We are perhaps losing a golden chance to find out all we can from a minute inspection of the Comox Country. Knowing so little of it. If we can scarcely speak with any confidence as to the approximate value of those tracks we are after. However I trust Mr. Bryden will prepare and make the trip to Comox before the present month expires. Capt. Clarke will do all he can to get those interested in the Union Claim to make an offer to us at a much lower price than they have hitherto named, provided he is given a bonus if he succeeds i.e. he will work on that condition. He only waits to see if Col. Houghton means business. Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. are turning their attention to shaft sinking, which we ought not to object to (seeing that they go to work within say 500 yards of our ground) were it not that they take away our men.

There is a feeling, so I am told, among Dunsmuir’s miners that our employees get all of his contracts- because he does not want to lose those he has producing coal? There may be something in the rumors, as it would probably be to the advantage of our Wellington friends to pay our men well and to get them away and started at contract work, while their coal raising continues undiminished, if not increasing. Bryden is just as silent as ever about Dunsmuir’s movements. That he is well posted, if not an advisor, in all their plans I am well satisfied in my own mind. I think it is a great pity we can not get hold of that Rippon Estates, but of course so long as Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co’s lawyer keeps the matter in abeyance, as he now is doing, we shall have no opportunity of bidding for the land.

Nicholas and Francis, who own what used to be known as the “Cornish Farm” when you were here, are not men of their (Page 159) (5) word. They gave me a distinct promise that they would let me know next week (this was three weeks ago) what price they wanted for the surface and what price they wanted for the mineral rights of their 600 acres. They have not been to see me at all, and I hardly think it would be wise to appear very anxious about their land - to go after them. I shall manage perhaps to come across one of the partners by accident in a few days. What would you think of an attempt to get the mineral rights of all those who are disposed to sell who own coal land in the Mountain District? Of course we should require full privileges to search for and work coal: but if we could purchase the minerals at a low rate they might remain undisturbed for a time and we should be free of the land taxes. Could you name any figure that we might offer for mineral and [---?] rights] at so much an acre?

Rosenfeld, I hear, has left rather suddenly for Europe. He is almost sure to call at the Head Office, and he may talk over the matter of the Company owning a ship or two. He said to me that he might take a joint interest with the Company in the purchase of vessels. In any arrangement of that kind, it would be essential I should say to stipulate for a munificent rate of Freight, so that the coal should not be overcharged under that hand.

Harewood is at a standstill. Bulkley is expected up tomorrow night, and the men believe he will set them to work to prove or cut through the stone barrier which confronts them. Our own mining operations are now sadly impeded by want of men. It surprises and annoys me to see the oldest and some of the best of our miners quietly slipping off to Wellington. They are generally got away by a pretext of contracting for something or other.

Fitzwilliam Slope you will see continues to lead us on though without any change in the prospect.

We must hope for the best and [--------------------] in the sinking. At last we are getting a screen fixed to pass the coal over as it is shipped to the Island. This was badly wanted as the Coal is not cleaned below, as it should be.

Hoping you are quite well and with best wishes

I remain Dear Mr. Wild

yours most truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 160)

2 June 74

My Dear Mother

On the 9th of last month I wrote to you and sent you a half a sovereign, and I promised to send you something more in the course of a week or two. I now redeem my promise by forwarding enclosed a Bill of Exchange for 5 pounds which I send at the request of Elizabeth’s husband who will refund the amount to me. You will therefore, dear Mother, consider the money now sent a present from Mr. Horne. I need not ask you, dear Mother. to write a short note or to get someone to write for you, to thank Mr. Horne for his goodness and generosity. I know if you are able, as I earnestly hope you may be, you will not delay writing to show that you are thankful for and appreciate his great kindness. I am glad to say that we are all quite well. A few days ago. I got some photographs taken of Mark and Tommy, but they are no t good ones. Mark does not look at all like himself, but I [will?] (Page 161) send the pictures to you such as they are, though I hope in a short time we shall get some better. Mark does not want me to send any of his pictures away, because he says they are such ugly ones.

I have not heard from [Cousin?] William Bate, David [Botham?], Thomas Hughes and others I wrote to some months ago. I suppose some of them will write by and by. I see by the English papers I get that you have some lively trade disputes around you. People surely are not so comfortable with the [Union?] agitations, and other labour disturbances as they were without them 20 years ago. How quickly the last 20 years have fled. I will soon be that time that I bade adieu to my native land, to many kind relations, and to you my Dear Mother. I pray to God we may be spared to meet again in this world, but if not here, then hereafter. The children send kindest love to you, and often ask me many question about their Grandmama. Sarah Ann wishes you and father-in -law to accept her best love. I shall write again before long, and for the present have to ask you to kindly remember us to all Uncles, Aunts, and Cousins and father-in-law.

and believe me to remain
your very Affectionate Son.

Mark

(Page 162)

6 June 74

My dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind favor of the 20th I have received, for which please accept many thanks.

Campbell and Battersby, the two gentlemen you named, did not come beyond Victoria. and I have not heard of any business they did in Victoria. I am greatly obliged of your intimations when any of the would-be mine investors are stopping up this way. I was rather surprised to hear of Mr. Rosenfeld’s rather sudden departure. I hope he will have a pleasant journey to Europe and find his family all in the enjoyment of good health. When you write, kindly remember me and Mrs. Bate to him.

Referring to the “Shooting Star’s” last cargo of coal. I fancy it will turn out better than Austin anticipates. At all events. I hope so, I don’t see why it should be very small. I am sorry the engineer of the “Prince Alfred” again complains of Fitzwilliam coal. The fact is (Page 163) the coal wants to be more carefully cleaned before shipment. Some of the coal has been sent aboard ship direct from the mine without screening or cleaning, and although all the coal is supposed to be free of dross in the mine I know too well that almost every one of them will take advantage and pop in the boxes anything that will weigh if they think it will pass undetected. We must see that the coal is sent away clean. You headed off Bichard nicely, I hope the Pacific Rail Steamship Company will like the old Douglas delivered to the “Arkwright’. If you can manage it, I should be very glad to get a cargo from Fitzwilliam Mine (say 100 tons) this month to make our business look up for the half year. If there is no vessel on the way to us, I have thought you might get one directed hither from Port Gamble. Operations at Harewood have been suspended for two weeks. They have not yet got anything worth mentioning. Dunsmuir and Co are sinking in a small shaft alongside our ground about ¾ of a mile from Departure Bay, at a spot where Dunsmuir bored in 1871. I hope he will strike it rich for our own good as well as his own at the place he is sinking.

It is rather too bad after the [‘Atlanta’?] was loaded quickly, to be kept waiting three days for a steamer. We look for more men by the return of the ‘California’. Very few of them already came back from [C?] remain in the country.

With best wishes and kind regards of Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain your very sincerely

M. Bate.

 

(Page 164)

20 Jun 74

My dear Mr. Bermingham

I am very sorry indeed to learn of the disaster of the “Prince Alfred’, and I fear from what Mr. Rosenfeld told me (though I sincerely hope my impression is wrong) that you had the unfortunate steamer only partially insured. I expect also that you know the new Boiler, and other machinery you were preparing for the vessel, in a forward state, and may have them on your hands. I cannot gather from the paper how the poor ‘Prince’ got ashore, but as it is said a thick fog prevailed at the time I presume she was considerably out of her course. Passengers all saved, as well as the hands, bullion etc. seem (Page 165)

to indicate that if the weather was clear a plan to beach might have been found.

Whether you are a great loser by the wreck or not (I know it will give you a deal of trouble and I trust some good friend will have a boat at your service to carry out the Mail contract. I feel under many and deep obligations to you for your great kindness in getting our pictures. They are first rate and give every satisfaction. Kindly ask the artist to retain the negative, as we may want more by and by. Please find herewith a cheque which will pay for the pictures $91, and Institute Books 14.29.

We will not forget to remember you to Emily and Alport.

Coasters keep us pretty busy all the time. We have just finished the Black Diamond & Emma, and Steamer Eliza, the latter with a cargo for the Victoria Gas Company- 121 tons and the ‘Isabel’ has dropped in for 125 tons. We shall dispose of something like 6,000 tons this month if we get through with the ‘Arkwright’. Accept best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself and hoping yourself and family are well.

I remain, yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 166)

6 Jul 1874

Private

Nanaimo

My dear Sir

I see by the ‘Nanaimo Free Press’ that the estate of the late Mr. Rippon is to be sold by Auction in Victoria on the 26 inst, but I do not observe any advertisement referring to the land in the Victoria papers! The lawyers would seem to want to get the sale over as quickly as possible. Can you give me any particulars as to conditions of sale, which are to be produced at time of auction? If you can transmit any information (privately of course) by the return of the ‘Emma’, or by the ‘Isabel’ if she is coming up, I shall be greatly obliged. You will not let it be known I am certain who you are inquiring for.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

N. Shakespeare Esq.
Victoria

 

(Page 167)

6th. July 74

My dear Mr. Bermingham

As you state in your kind favour of the 19th ultimo, I was astonished and pained to learn of the loss of the ‘Prince Alfred’ and I am truly sorry to find that by her sinking yourself and Mr. Rosenfeld were large pecuniary sufferers. Let us hope that the business between your port and Victoria will so greatly improve as to compensate you for the sacrifice of the poor ‘Prince’. A private note from Victoria tells me that the ‘Prince Alfred’ will be missed there, of which I have no doubt [Sholls?] conduct without a question was highly culpable, and it seems to me a pity there is not some means of punishing such conduct, though I expect he will render himself unfit for another command, at all (Page 168)

events for a long time to come.

I quite agree that we had better get a little of the Fitzwilliam coal in stock for two or three reasons - especially because we can deal better with the man when we have a heap at the slope mouth. Broderick and Co. have not yet applied for the 130 tons of coal which they loaned; when they do it will be furnished as you wish.

We are getting a few more men among us, and expect to get out more coal by the end of the month. The product of Fitzwilliam mine looks splendid in the heap. The ‘Aureola’ is at the Wellington mine for Bichard I suppose, and Dunsmuir tells me they are looking for a vessel that will carry 1700 tons. Berryman is up this way again. Harewood does not improve. It is costing some money to explore the place. They might hit something by and by. Bulkley tells me “he does not despair”. We struck the Newcastle coal under Fitzwilliam the other day, and found the seam rather soft at the place it was pierced. We are boring for it again at another place - not quite halfway down the slope.

Hoping you are well and with best regards in which Mrs. Bate joins.

I remain most truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 169)

9 July 1874

Private

Nanaimo

My dear Sir,

I consider Mr. McKay Sabiston good for $1000.00. He has property here worth four times that amount, and appears to be doing a good business.
Levi, I am afraid, is in difficulty, I hear of him borrowing, and trying to borrow, money to meet his bills. If he is much behind, he will find it a hard matter to keep afloat.

Enclosing cheque for interest on Masonic loan.

I am, my dear Sir

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 170)

11 July 1874

Nanaimo

My dear Sir

I have duly to hand your kind favor of the 8th inst and beg to thank you for it.

I thought the sale of Rippon’s Estate was about to take place in a sort of “hole and corner” fashion to meet the wishes of a particular friend or two of Mr. Johnson.

As the matter has gone so far, do not endeavour to postpone the sale. It is satisfactory to know that the property will be sold publicly and if there is much noise about it a private sale may be effected. I have my instructions and am quite prepared for the Auction, and shall be at hand to attend to it. Let the matter take its course, and I will explain why when I see you, as I hope to do by the next trip of the ‘Maude’.

But above all things. Keep our correspondence and intentions strictly private and confidential, so that my plans may not be frustrated. My name must not be whispered.

By all means let the sale come off on the 20th. So long as it is at Public auction, justice should be done to all concerned.

In great haste,

yours most truly

M. Bate

N. Shakespeare Esq.
Victoria
 

(Page 171)

22nd July 74

My dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind favor of the 8th was handed to me in Victoria whither I went to bid for a piece of ground lying near the Wellington mine, and I expect I put my foot on it, or rather someone else did for me, I met previous to the sale. I told a man named Shakespeare-a photographer of Victoria- he might bid for the Rippon Estate as the property is called to the amount of 5,000.00, if he liked, and if the land was knocked down to him at that figure I would take it. I spoke to the man about bidding because I was under some obligation to him for posting me on the subject of the sale, and getting it postponed. He originally had all the Rippon’s papers and Rippon dying intestate he handed them (Page 172)

to a lawyer who fixed things. Shakespeare attended the Auction, and the stupid fool instead of bidding 5000.00 bid 250.00 an acre for 100 acres which amounts to $25,000!! Fortunately he gave his own name as the purchaser and signed the agreement, or conditions, of sale in his own name, but after finding out what a gigantic mistake he had made, he told the auctioneer he was acting for me. Of course, I immediately repudiated the purchase as far as I was concerned, but I expect I shall get the Auctioneer and lawyer after me to pay up. The fellow had been calculating he said 100 acres at 250 as $2500. --. The land however must be worth something to our Wellington neighbours when Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. just bid $24,000.00 for it!

I hope Mr. Rosenfeld will get a good steamship. Charge us with the $133.00 difference in price of coal got from Brodrick. The next time they seem short and have to borrow from others, they should get a good scolding! Don’t you think so?

Your trouble with the [Wm. Taber?] I trust are over till you get better suited. I heard some of those chronic grumblers in Victoria talking about her.

With best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain, yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 173)

22 July 74

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

Please find enclosed a cheque for the amount of your Bill to […?] inst.

I shall feel obliged if you will kindly prepare a draft for us as an agreement empowering a person who advances money on property to take possession and hold it if the amount loaned is not promptly paid - i.e. for the property to belong absolutely to the holder of the agreement instead of having to sell it as provided in a mortgage.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen

for the Company

M. Bate

P.S. Application has been made to us for a right of way and a plot of land for a Railway terminus. The latter we need for our own purposes and intend to decline selling it. Please advise us if we can be compelled to sell ground we actually require when we have plenty adjoining the patch asked for? The following sketch (where coloured red) will show the position of the piece applied for, and the ground on either side.

[Original includes a sketch]

M. B

(Page 174)

22 July 1874

Nanaimo

Edwin Johnson Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

In acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 20th inst requesting me to pay the sum of $6250- being 20% of the sum for which Section 20 Range IV Mountain District Vancouver Island was knocked down to Mr. Shakespeare, please allow me to state that immediately previous to the sale of the property of the late Mr. Rippon in conversation with Mr. Shakespeare I said he might bid 5000 - for the Estate if he liked and that if it was knocked down to him at that amount I would find the money. This statement no doubt Mr. Shakespeare will corroborate. Mr. H. F. Heisterman was my agent. The Estate was not knocked down to me, nor did I know the name of the purchaser until I heard on my way along the street that Mr. Shakespeare has said after giving his own name as the buyer, signing the agreement and finding out what he had done - he was acting for me! You will see how far he was so acting. I at once presented myself to the auctioneer to repudiate the purchase as far as I was concerned. Knowing the foregoing facts surely you will not consider me liable in any way.

I am, dear Sir

Yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 175)

22 July 1874

Nanaimo

PRIVATE

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

Gentlemen,

I enclose copy of a letter from, and copy of letter to, Mr. Edwin

Johnson referring to the Rippon Estate. You will perceive Mr. Shakespeare is alluded to by Mr. Johnson as my agent. On the other hand, you will note my conversation, as I give it with Mr. Shakespeare with whom please have a talk. I think you will find he will agree my statement is correct. Dunsmuir Diggle & Co are very uncomfortable, I am informed, because they have not acquired the land and I believe they will make efforts to get it by private sale. I am prepared to give a good sum for the Estate. Please let me have your advice how to act in this matter? And it might be worthwhile asking for Shakespeare’s authority for bidding so high on my account. I cannot see how I can in any way be bound by such an act as that of Shakespeare, and I trust you may succeed in showing Mr. Mason I should not be called upon to satisfy his bid.

I am gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 176)

22nd July 74

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

My dear Sir

Please find enclosed a cheque for $50 compensation we agreed

upon for your services attending the Auction sale of the Rippon Estate.

PRIVATE

An application has been made to me for 25% of the amount Shakespeare bid as “my agent”. I have stated you were my agent, and have given the conversation I had with Shakespeare just immediately before the sale. I said he might bid $5,000 - for the Estate if he likes and that if it was knocked down to him at that amount I would “find the money”. This statement I have no doubt Shakespeare will agree is correct.

If you hear anything about a private sale of the Estate kindly drop me a line.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

30 July 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

With reference to the Rippon Estate will you kindly watch any business connected therewith (as regards the late Auction) on my personal account?

The Vancouver Coal Co. must not be mixed up in that matter. You have no doubt received a letter dated 24th inst instructing you what to do for the Company if the Estate is for sale privately.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

(Page 177)

 

30 July 1874

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

My dear Sir

I am pleased to learn that you saw Mr. Shakespeare because I have felt afraid the mistake he made might give me trouble. You would see by my last note that I did not give him direct authority to bid. I merely said he might bid if he liked, and if the property was knocked down to him at the price I named, I would take it off his hands. I have no doubt Mr. Shakespeare, as a man of honor, will corroborate what I state. I instructed Messrs Drake and Jackson to watch the business on my behalf, and I need hardly say shall feel thankful for any good words of yours in the matter. If anything is said about the amount you were to bid for me, don’t mention it? If it is necessary to do so say $10,000.00 or a little over. I am thinking Egerton & Co. want the property badly.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 178)

1st August 1874

My dear Mr. Wild

Your kind note on the 4th June reached me a little over a week ago. The whole of this present week I have felt rather uneasy on account of a “strike” among the workmen, particulars of which you will, if in London, of course obtain from official letters. As soon as the [Doctor] resigned (It was for his immediate removal that the men stopped away from the pit) I looked for the return to work of all the miners. Today is Saturday, and those who are not drinking are away in the country hunting and fishing, and they none of them seem to be in a hurry for digging coal. It is supposed that work will be resumed on Monday, but the loss of 6 days extract of coal, say 1000 tons is a somewhat serious matter, and we have not been in a position to prevent it. I wanted, however as soon as the cause of the men’s suspension of work was removed to inform their deputation. My intention was to have them at the office and introduce the subject by enquiring what was to be done in the direction of engaging another doctor, and in that way incidentally mention Dr. Jones' resignation. But Mr. Bryden objected to that course, saying he was not going to “knock under to the men - not going down on his knees to them - they would soon find out the Doctor had resigned. Certainly it is generally known the Doctor’s connection with the Company has ceased for he himself has informed his patients, and I have posted a notice on the office door making the fact known, yet our local paper states this morning that the miners deputation have received no official notice of it. I believe the best plan would have been as I suggested--to have got the deputation at the office and listened to anything they might propose regarding a new medical man, (Page 179)

for after all it is a question there is no harm in letting them have a voice in, especially as ninety nine of a hundred of the men have signified a want of confidence in Dr Jones by presenting a petition to that effect. Their conduct in suspending work so abruptly in making so ‘preemptory’ [sic] a demand for the Dr’s removal, and in assuming the risk of leaving the whole district without a physician cannot by any means be justified, and if only to show that such high handed measures will be resented, I wish we were in a position to tell the ringleaders to go about their business, and let the others go to the mine at their leisure. That such a step would hardly be wise just now you will readily believe, I think, knowing that at the old pit we have an empty bin and a ship to load, and have moreover important work to push forward during the [------?] months. A great many of the miners - those who have means would not fear or care for a 12 month strike, and as they all seem to make common cause of this last grievance, we can not do better, in my opinion than conciliate them and get over the difficulty as speedily as possible as a long strike would be a costly business to the Co.

The Union Company say they will not bond their coal claim again to any one - they will only sell for cash, and they stick to their figure of $55,000.00 which is high considering the length of road required and the exposed character of their intended shipping point. There is a good claim adjoining the Union - to the West of it, and according to Mr. Bryden’s report of his late examination of the country an excellent selection of 2000 acres might be made at the very place at Deep Bay that Lansdale spoke favorably of when I sent him in 1870. But, unfortunately, Dr. Ash owns about all the good frontage at Deep Bay. I think the whole of the Peninsula at Maple Point is his and he wants 2000 pounds for it; he would probably take less.

To any Company having 2000 acres or upwards in the Bay, Dr. Ash’s land would be almost a necessity, as on the opposite side the water is shallow - runs out a long distance at low tide so that wharf buildings and maintaining these would be a large item compared with the cost of Dr. Ash’s 160 some odd acres. Another good spot Mr. Bryden says is found on Englishman River, which runs into the gulf about at the entrance of North West Bay near Nanoose. I have explained to the Board that Dr. (Page 180) (5) Ash privately told me how we might proceed to get coal land, and that he informed me the Canadian Government had already allotted to Mr. G. M. Sproat 2000 acres! My impression is that the board would do well to apply at once to the Dominion Government for authority to explore for minerals - Iron, copper and coal over unoccupied and unsold land, say South of Deep Bay, and between that place and Nanoose, and for privilege of buying 8000 acres in one or more of the particular places to be examined. It will be advisable for two or three reasons that the application be made from the Head Office. The spot adjoining the Union claim might be asked don’t you think in the name of some party other than the Company?

I could not trade with the Cornishmen - Nicholas and Francis. The senior partner (when I was prepared to agree to the price they asked in April) said positively they would not sell. The Rippon Estate was put up at Auction on the 25th ult. and through the blundering of Mr. Shakespeare, whose conduct I have made known in my official letters, it will probably go into the hands of the Auctioneer again. Our neighbours (Page 181) (6) want the 100 acres badly, and they bid $24,000.00 for it! My limit was half the money, and without authority I would not like to go higher. Mr. Bryden will not say anything about the value of the land. He merely observes, “it might be valuable and it might not”. Dunsmuir and the whole family [compact?] are mad at me for endeavoring to secure Rippon’s ground. They think they would have got it for under $5000.00 if I had not, as Dunsmuir says, interfered, and he says I had no business to do so. He had it from the best authority that the Company had not instructed [me?] to buy or bid. Dunsmuir is annoyed too because I checkmated him in a little game he and Spalding were playing to get a section of land close to their mine belonging to Mr. C. W. Chantrell. I have advanced only myself on a Mortgage of the land with the distinct understanding that I am to get the refusal of it for the Company when Chantrell is disposed to sell. Spalding, who it is said acts for Admiral Ferguson, is always working for the Wellington concern, and has never a good word for us.

The Baynes Sound Co., Mr. (Ward?) told me, (7) have actually been offered, and have refused to accept 50,000.00 for the property, and are now about to organize a new Company to work the coal, considerable aid being offered by some Canadian Gentlemen of Montreal. Mr. Ward said they want 60,000.00 if they sell. He promised me a prospectus of the proposed new Company, but he has not yet sent it to me. He was up here the other day looking at Harewood with Bulkley.

The Diamond Borer would be an expensive machine, and would not, it is thought be suited altogether to our ground, which in places is so variable. At Newcastle Island the sandstone is gritty, while on this side, between the Douglas and Newcastle Coal, and have thick beds of conglomerate. Anything getting out of order here about such a machine might cause a deal of trouble to set right.

We have one or two jobs under way which will draw off no small amount of our funds viz: the cutting of a drain from high water mark with the old Parkhead slope, thence into Douglas Pit workings, and the renewal of

(Page 180) (8) the trestle work of the Railway Bridge, which structure is getting very shaky In fact nearly the whole of the Railway is in a bad state, the sleepers for quite a distance being all rotten. The other day the locomotive and loaded cars ran off the road owing [to the rails separating?] and, to make matters worse, Cooper had got into a habit of leaving his work at noon on Saturday to visit a piece of land he has preempted, and the brakeman as well, not withstanding the condition of the road and Bridge, is left alone to take to the wharf the coal and get up wagons. I have felt reason to speak about the danger there is in trusting the brakeman with the engine and have [--] of Cooper going away from his business [and have that it seems received the displeasure of Mrs. If not of Br. Cooper. Of course, nothing disrespectful is ever said to me either [?] The Company’s property and work must be attended to.

Fitzwilliam Mine is a disappointment. There is nothing for it but to persevere with the exploration, and [like?] see the sides of the slope and its bottom penetrated by a small drift. The Bore at the South end of the Island is now going on well.

Mr. Loat gets on at the office very nicely, but he does not seem to like being kept so close at his desk. I am afraid he will not stand it long. I make things as pleasant and as light for him as I can and have always an encouraging word for him. Alport’s equal, however, would be hard to find. He always appeared to anticipate my wishes and was a most faithful worker. I have only had one letter from him since he got to Beaufort. He does not speak at all complimentary of the place, but is full of hope.

I remain dear Mr. Wild with best wishes and kindest regards.

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 182)

5 August 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I was rather surprised to hear by your kind note of the 20th ult that Berryman has made arrangements to get the Wellington Coal. Bichard did not come up on the [Taber?] I think. Perhaps he will be coming next trip. The papers I can see are going after the [Wm. Taber?], as our little popgun put in shot, which, however, would never be felt. The [Taber?] I expect gives you more or less annoyance when a long upward passage is made. This time of year, strong headwinds prevail between San Francisco and Victoria. The “strike”, which lasted 8 days, had been a most vexatious affair. We have a hard lot of fellows to deal with - many of whom will be got rid of as soon as possible. We would have moved the Buena Vista to the Island to load but (Page 183) were expecting when the Doctor resigned that every day would be the last of the “strike”. The men got greatly scattered in a few days. Dunsmuir, Diggle and Co, I must say to their credit, promised not to employ any of our miners, and in a struggle with labor, assistance in that way is worth something.

Mr. Rosenfeld soon let our Secty. know of the loss of the ‘Prince Alfred’. He has either been to London or written.

I hope you have succeeded in getting the ‘Mary Eddy’ at 4.00 freight. I have not heard from Victoria about her and suppose some enquiry has been made of your respecting the engagement of the vessel. There is another English vessel nearly due at Victoria but I believe she goes to Portland after discharging Victoria freight. The 'Ventura', the “Colonist”, tells us has been bought by you to run on the Victoria route. I trust she will prove a good vessel, and steers clear of danger. We have plenty of miners here now they are coming from the diggings East and half a dozen have [?] come among us from the old country. These latter I expect bring with them advanced notice on grievances & etc. and now can be a very desirable acquisition to our staff.

Hoping you are well and with best wishes

from Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain, Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 184)

15th. Aug 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I am surprised to learn by your letter of the 3rd inst that Messrs Robertson & Johnson have taken out a summons for me to ‘show cause’ why the sale to me of section 20 Range IV Mountain District etc should not be confirmed. It will certainly not be difficult I think to show that I did not buy, nor authorize Shakespeare to buy. My authority, if it can be so termed, was simply telling Mr. Shakespeare he might bid 5000 - if he liked, and if knocked down to him at that amount I would take the property off his hands, etc. I only went to the Auctioneers at the suggestion of Mr. Heisterman when I heard it mentioned that Shakespeare had said he was acting for me (although he had used his own name) and I also thought it might be necessary to repudiate the purchase as far as I was concerned. Shakespeare admits, I believe, what I told him and I understand he informed Mr. Mason he was bidding under a misapprehension - supposed he had bid 2500.00! I was entirely ignorant of his bidding, although in the room, and was greatly astonished when I heard his name used as the purchaser. I hope you will be able to smooth the matter over in Court and outside for it is a business I ought not by any means to be harassed about.

Yours truly, Gentlemen

M. Bate

(Page 185)

Nanaimo

Aug 6, 1874

H.F. Heisterman Esq.

Victoria

My Dear Sir

I have received with thanks your favor of the 3rd inst.

Surely [Plummer and Pagden?] (the former particularly) can not expect me to ratify the bidding of Shakespeare. They know I repudiated his action at the time, and told them I had only mentioned to Shakespeare that he might bid 5000 - if he liked. I did not give him absolute authority to bid even. It was left (--and you know how greatly I was surprised when I heard he had said he was acting for me.) to himself whether to bid or not. It is not too bad to think that I should be harassed about the matter?

The lodge room now has only to be furnished.

Yours very truly

M. Bate.

12 August 1874

PRIVATE

Nanaimo

Messrs. Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen.

I have thought I would ask if you think a Fee to the Official Administrator or in any other quarter, would do any good in assisting you to clear me of that unfortunate blunder of Mr. Shakespeare?

Yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 186)

12 August 1874

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman, Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

I have to thank you for your note of the 10th inst. Do you think a fee to the Official Administrator (Mr. Mason) would do any good? I am thinking of suggesting this to Messrs Drake and Jackson. There is no doubt Shakespeare will be let slip if it is thought anything can be got out of me. It is well known rule of law, however, that an agent (I did not consider S my agent) who bid more than he is authorized renders himself liable and not his principal. A good word now and then will help the case.

I might want you arbitrate on the question of value of land etc shortly. Do you think you could ask for us and select an umpire who could favorably consider your views?

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 187)

19 Aug. 1874

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

The good advice tendered in yours of the 12th inst. I greatly appreciate. Why I spoke of a fee was that it is possible any action taken with regard to Shakespeare’s blunder may be prompted by those who are looking after Commissions. I can only reiterate that I told S ‘ he might bid $5,000, if he liked and if the property was knocked down to him at that price I would take it. Of course, I knew it would take a larger sum than I named to him to buy. I do not feel alarmed about the matter, but I do not care to be annoyed as well perhaps as be subject to a good Bill of expenses to my legal advisers, who I am sure will properly deal with the case. I understand privately that Mr. Shakespeare is willing to make affidavit “that he only had authority from me to bid the amount or $5000. only”

I have informed the person who wants land from us the price we are prepared to accept, but I am uncertain if the sum named will be acceptable.

Yours very truly

& fraternally

M. Bate

(Page 188)

20 Aug 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am a little surprised to find by your kind favor of the 4th instant that you had no Cypherbook by which to interpret my telegram of the 31st ultimo. A counterpart of the one I have here was kept by Mr. Rosenfeld who had it with him when he visited the place in January. You may be able to find it. If not, if you can get a blank book I will fill it up on receiving it. I hear nothing said about a Doctor now. We have not yet got a successor for Dr. [?].

That affair of Rippon's Estate will likely be decided by the courts. I don’t know what land young Rippon can allude to which he (Page 189) says he has to dispose of. I suppose you did not write for particulars? I have tried to get one or two plots of ground adjoining the Co's but the owners ask such extraordinary prices that I cannot pretend to deal with them. I hold a mortgage on a claim close to the Wellington mine belonging to C. N. Chantrell.

Many thanks for procuring the compass. It is a fair instrument, but appears to be incomplete. There is no means of fastening it on the tripod. The socket has to be stuck on a Jacob’s staff i.e. a single pole, which is stuck in the ground, making it rather awkward to use. Will you kindly ask Mr. Ewing if there should not be a socket joint to screw to the tripod? Please find enclosed a cheque for (59.50). It is really cheap.

We are getting the debris out of Douglas Pit pretty lively. We are impeded, however, by having little air at the back. The channels of ventilation are all choked. Long letters reached me yesterday morning from Emily and Alport. They are quite well and begin to feel a little settled. Emily gave birth to a daughter on the 14th May. I don’t like the idea I must confess of being a “Grand-dad” so soon. Myself and Mrs. Bate have had a good laugh over this part of the business. When writing to Mr. Rosenfeld, please have the goodness to remember me and Mrs. Bate to him.

Asking you to accept our united regards for yourself,

I am, yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 191)

20 August 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

Gentlemen

I am in receipt of your letter of the 17th with enclosures, and I now beg to forward herewith an affidavit stating the case of the unfortunate “auction of the Rippon estate” as far as my conversation with Mr. Shakespeare went. I have been so very tightly pressed with business since the 'Maude' arrived that I have hardly had time to fully consider the matter in question, I hope, however, if anything more is necessary for me to do or say that you will have an opportunity of informing me.

The name of the Vancouver Coal Co. was not mentioned by me to Shakespeare. That part of his Affidavit is wrong and I should like him to correct it. He should not have told Plummer “it was for the Vancouver Coal Co.” With this and one or two other perhaps trifling exceptions, Shakespeare’s affidavit is not far wrong. You will note, if it will be of any service, that I did not give Mr.

(Page 190) Shakespeare absolute authority- to bid. I told him he may bid.

He knew I had engaged another person, and it was optional with him whether he bid or not. If it is asked why I said anything at all to Shakespeare about bidding, when I had employed an experienced Agent, my answer is that I had been in the confidence of Mr. Shakespeare, who had kept me posted on the question of the Sale etc. He seemed to me to be anxious to bid, and I accordingly, believing it quite safe, told him he might bid as high as $5,000.--etc.

I can not understand what gave rise to the words accredited to Mr. Shakespeare in Mr. Plummer’s affidavit Viz: “that I would come in shortly when the crowd had left as he (meaning me) did not want to be known at present in the matter”. The first intimation I had of the sale as stated in my affidavit, and the first time I spoke to Mr. Shakespeare after the property was knocked down to him occurred as I have also stated in my affidavit and in the presence of several persons, Shakespeare’s affidavit will corroborate this I think, and I immediately went to the Auction room on Mr. Shakespeare (Page 192) speaking to me.

I most distinctly and emphatically deny the words attributed to me by Mr. Plummer in his affidavit when he stated that I said “It will have to be revoked on one side he (Shakespeare) acted as my agent and has exceeded my instructions.”

Having confidence that you will bring the case to a successful issue, by showing that I cannot be held liable for such a mistake or blunder as that of Mr. Shakespeare.

I am, Gentlemen,

yours very truly,

M. Bate

(Page 193)

22nd. August 1874

Nanaimo

H. Y. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

It has occurred to me that you might be called upon in connection with the matter of the Rippon Estate for an affidavit, or as a witness in some way, and I send you copies of affidavits made by myself and Shakespeare so that you may not conflict if you can help it. Do not name the sum you were told to go to by me beyond saying, if necessary, a trifle over $10,000.00.

I think I shall intimate to Mr. Jackson that you may be of service to me, as you will perhaps remember my surprise and chagrin when I learned what Shakespeare had done, and have some recollection of our conversation as given in my affidavit, and your suggesting that I should repudiate Shakespeare’s business forthwith.

Kindly return the enclosures to me and oblige

Yours very truly,

M. Bate.

(Page 194)

22 August 1874

PRIVATE

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

 

Gentlemen.

It is just possible that it may be attempted to show Mr. Shakespeare was employed simply as a puffer. His own affiliate, however, should disprove anything of that kind. I had not the least notion or intention of bidding beyond the sum I named to Mr. Heisterman under any circumstances. By the way, would Mr. Heisterman be able to offer any testimony that would be of service?

The more I think about this unfortunate business, the more I believe I should not have been troubled about it. A good authority Lord St. Leonard states: “An Agent, of course, cannot go beyond his authority. If, for example, he were to bid more for an Estate than he was authorized he would himself be bound as the actual purchaser, but his principal would not be bound”. So that if Mr. Plummer’s affidavit be of more weight than the other as regards the agency question, I cannot see how I can be held responsible for another’s blunder in such a case.

I am, Gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 195)

26 August 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I am pleased you found my affidavit satisfactory.

I have today sworn one before Capt. Ferguson J.P., Capt. Spalding being still away at Comox. I also swore to a copy of the same on the 20th and have written and signed another copy not sworn to. I send them all herewith that you may use which you think proper.

Hoping soon to hear good news from you.

I am, Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

2 Sept. 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen’

I deem it advisable to inform you, in confidence of course, that in case it should be hinted that I might be desired or required by the court to ratify the bidding of Shakespeare for the Rippon Estate, that it would be altogether out of my power to do so. All I am worth would not amount to one sixth of the sum Shakespeare bid. This information you can use, or not, as you think proper, to show the utter folly of any attempt to force me to buy the estate at a figure I could not begin to raise.

I am, Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 196)

5th Sept. 1874

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am particularly pleased to learn by your kind favor of the 19th ultimo that the [Wm. Tabor?] will be replaced by the 'Idaho'. If I recollect rightly, the 'Idaho' is a pretty fast boat, and you might perhaps find it an advantage for her to run up here occasionally to get coal for vessel use. I fancy you might effect a saving by that means.

Bulkley has a poor “Spec” at Harewood. His workmen speak very discouragingly of the place he is exploring, and I believe he is looking about for some other spot to examine. Unfortunately for Bulkley etc., they have only the one seam in their Estate as far as known and they have not yet found it as regular as it (Page 197) ought to be for successful working out there. Our seam at the bottom of Douglas pit is getting better lately. Bichard arrived here by the ‘Emma’ last evening. I have not seen him and he may leave tonight. Dunsmuir & Co. I hear are shipping coal to Berryman & Doyle after the expiry of the present agreement with Bichard, and Dunsmuir expects that a steamer will be employed in the conveyance of the Wellington Coal to San Francisco. I think I mentioned in my last letter that we had heard from Emily and that she had given birth to a daughter. They are all well, and apparently begin to feel a little more settled. Alport has real hopes of his future being a bright one. [Ward?] told me Phelan had offered $50,000.00 cash for Baynes Sound and that they will not sell under $60,000. I have no doubt they wish they may get it. The $130 debited to the Co. is all right. I am glad to hear of Mr. Rosenfeld’s interview with the Directors. His personal visits to the Board will be most welcome. I know. I hope he keeps in good health. When he was up here I thought he did not look very strong. In your next letter to him kindly remember Mrs. Bate and myself to him. We have stopped sinking Fitzwilliam and are going to drift in at the sides from the bottom where the coal is still [---]. The bore at the South end of the Island near which we landed with Mr. Bell is down nearly 300 feet.

Asking you to accept best regards from Mrs. Bate and myself.

I remain

yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 198)

10 September 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Clarke

I ought to have owned the receipt of your note of the 20th ultimo before. Your small bill for storage is an unusual charge, is it not? We have never paid storage before, and Messrs Broderick and Co. inform me that the goods were not on the wharf more than a day and a half, and that they were ready to take the freight sooner that it was given to them.

We got long letters from Beaufort two weeks ago. All is well. Emily gave birth to a daughter on the 11th May. Fancy being made a Grandad at 37! You ought to read the accounts they gave of the baby. I suppose, however, you will get a 2nd edition of it.

The ‘Marie Claire’ I hear is again bonded. Surely you find it tedious work to keep hanging on trusting to commission agents? Why not ask a reasonable price and get the money, and make use of it?

With best wishes, and hoping yourself and Mrs. Clarke are well.

Believe me

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 199)

16 Sept 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Clarke

In acknowledging receipt of yours of the 14th, I have just time to say we will fix that little matter of storage all right. It was represented by Broderick & Co. that it was [caused?] to the smallness of the wharf and want of room that goods had to be removed, but you will I know set matters straight another time.

Unless I could deal for the whole claim it would hardly be wise to have anything to do with the [invoice?]I may tell you, of course in confidence, that we should not do well to go into business with some of your partners. As soon as we can get a reasonable offer of your claim it will, I am sure, be favorably considered on my recommendation. I feel confident Wallace (that is the Gentlemen’s name I believe to whom the claim is bonded) will not succeed any better than did Col. Houghton. You will see. It is no use aiming to get the price asked.

With reference to Levis' services it is said Mr. R. M. Sabiston will not let the store to any one but Levi! I don’t know if it is so. As regards the business [-------] it ought to pay in my opinion. Levi, as you know, had a first rate stand and as a consequence a good run of customers, and in judicious hands methinks there should be no failure. Hirst is making money fast. Levi fully expects, I believe, to resume operations at his old stand.

With kind regards to yourself and Mrs. Clarke in which Mrs. Bate joins.

Believe me to remain

M. Bate

(Page 200)

17 Sept 84

My dear Mr. Wild

I am greatly obliged for your kind letter of the 8th ultimo. Your view with regard to future land acquisitions I think I fully comprehend, and it is not for lack of persistent, though somewhat unobtrusive, effort that I have not secured the Cornishman’s 600 acres. Of course as you say, the value of the mineral they hold is uncertain, and it is just possible it may not be there. My notion was (and is still) to make a little venture by way of exploring to satisfy myself on this point, but the Cornishmen are not likely to come to terms, at least they do not seem inclined that way just now. I must relate to you a little circumstance connected with this business I have been trying to carry out with Nicholas and Francis. On receipt of the Board's Despatch No 93 (3rd July) I read it over to Mr. Bryden, and coming to Paragraph 10, where a wish is expressed that the 600 acres be secured, I noticed he began to shuffle on his seat, and he evidently paid particular attention to what was said. After going through the Despatch, I asked his opinion about dealing with Nicholas and Francis and of their land. He replied “There can be nothing done with them”. The very next morning Dunsmuir went to the Cornishmen, which I thought looked rather suspicious, and Harvey (Dunsmuir’s Son-in-law), has been after them ever since. Seeing as Messrs. N & F must, what a fuss is being made about their land you will not be surprised that nothing can be done with them. I am firmly convinced it would be a wise plan to “keep my own Council” with reference to any intended or attempted purchase of land in the neighbourhood of the Wellington Mine. The Rippon Estate I fear will not be obtainable at the price I felt justified in making. I have heard nothing lately in relation to the auction, but I am informed that Dunsmuir, Diggle, (Page 201)

etc. are striving to get the 100 acres by private sale. It is rumoured also that Mr. Johnson, Solicitor to the Estate, or to the official administrator who has just gone to England will endeavor to find the Heir at law. I refer to this in my official letter of today. From the bother Dunsmuir, Spalding & Co made about the land I can not help believing that the Wellington people attach great value to it; indeed if half what is said be true they would not be able to carry on long without it. Bryden won’t enlighten me in the least as to what is going on at the Wellington mine. He can tell me however, what is going on about the tramway, shaft etc. There is scarcely anybody I believe outside of those directly and indirectly concerned who would think of questioning our privilege to buy ground near the Wellington Colliery, and as to crossing the interests of that concern you will pardon me, I hope, when I state that is a question that should not have any great weight with us. We have a precedent established by themselves. They are getting pretty well [--?] as by jumping into that claim of Parsons and did an opportunity offer I doubt not they would snap up another section or two. Now touching Parson’s mineral rights the poor fellow was almost forced to sell to Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. He is a simple-minded young man and Harvey, Dunsmuir’s son-in-law, and a brother of Harvey’s, kept Parsons in sight (in tow as they say here) for two or three days to get him to execute an agreement to sell. I had an agent after Parsons and had he not committed himself to our neighbours, and kept clear of them, it is very likely I should have got his minerals for about $3000 more than our opponents gave. Had I gone after him myself, I should have made the purchase (so Parsons says) but I was deterred solely by a desire not to undermine Dunsmuir & Co in private transaction. They, I have reason to think, have acted in a contrary spirit towards us with the Cornishmen. While referring to Wellington, I may say the new establishment is progressing fairly much against my wish I am obliged to confess. They have apparently a splendid seam of coal, and I have always felt as though we allowed them to get ahead too fast at the outset, when Bryden, if I remember rightly, wrote somewhat disparagingly

(Page 202) of their prospects. Their coal seems to be sought after, and a better price is paid than those we obtain. In a new arrangement with Berrymen & Doyle, they are to get 5.50 at the wharf, same as given by Mr. Bichard. The last named gentleman was here a little over a week ago, and he spoke anything but complimentary of the treatment he had received from Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. He remarked that he would want employment for one or two of his vessels and that he was not by any means disposed to engage them to Berryman who wanted to charter at 11.00 per ton. That is the figure, he observed, he credited his ships when carrying coal on his own account. I told him he might see Mr. Bermingham about a charter, and he said he should perhaps have to see an agent to obtain some Fitzwilliam coal for Honolulu and San Pedro. He must have coal for the latter place, he said, because he had a contract to carry out with a Railroad Company. Mr. Bichard, unless something turns up, will be no friend of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co from this out. To refer to the Wellington claims: it is only a few days ago that Bryden said, “ I begin to think the Company should get hold of the (Page 203) Union claim” and after a little talk he said it is the best property yet taken up in the Comox District: That even if we should acquire land to the West, we should have to sink for the coal, and by putting down a pit on the Union Co’s ground, coal would be obtained much nearer a shipping point. And then it strikes me we should have as good an opportunity to get an adjoining piece of ground if we held the Union claims as we shall without it and we should undoubtedly soon gain some accurate information about the Comox Country generally. The main objections, if it may be so termed, I have to the Union Co’s place in the want of a good harbour, and I might add the navigation of Baynes Sound for sailing vessels appears intricate and dangerous. A steam tug would be necessary for sailing craft: but a stream collier or two might be got hold of- say chartered at home - which would be suited to the trade. A small ship load of material would be needed for a railway, say 6 miles. One thing is quite certain (Mr. Bryden as well as myself agree upon this) that the whole 1000 acres of the Union Co.’s land is coal bearing. The line of outcrop, along a stream, is taken as the boundary.(Page 202) [This page is heavily overwritten with dark ink]

Mr. Bryden’s report [?] has been considered by the Board long ere this time and may I ask if some case can be offered to the [?] Company that can be lower sum than $55,000. $60,000 is the amount for which it is [handed] to Mr. Wallace, but I do not for one moment consider he will find a customer. If we are prepared with an offer and make it payable contingent upon the property turning out well, after an examination at our expense. They would perhaps feel a little inducement to accept. They would look upon a measure of that kind as bone fide, if they have confidence that the coal will stand looking into while [?] sale of the estate to [C ?]. I have not been at all discouraged by the Boards [?] approval of Capt. Clarke’s I soon became aware that he could not carry it out. He thought that his recommendation to sell after having virtually had them disposed of [This portion is undecipherable] and it was merely for his (Page 203) Clarke I think has very little influence with the other shareholders.

Harewood is indeed turning out badly. It does not appear that Mr. Bulkley will want a Railway at all for his Harewood Mine. [?] the matter of a double bridge. [_____________________?] Mr. B says ?] on the subject of a shipping port. He has not replied to any letter giving him the [price?]. We were prepared to accept per acre. [--?]. Leaving for Victoria the other day I thought he appeared disheartened although he went off whistling to keep his courage up. Almost anybody who gives any thought to this question speaks hopefully of the proposed treaty and if the [--?] accepts. It will confer on this section of the Dominion in particular. Surely we shall not be wrong in preparing for the good times coming in every possible way. [--?] examine the unexplored portion of our Estate in Mountain District and up Nanaimo River as well as get a patent or two. [--?] that we have [--?]. In the heart of Nanaimo River, I am almost positive there is no small [--?] just south of Chase River that we can never work to advantage [--?] Douglas pit. The underground distance would be too great [--?] who should be [--?] not what we have in the Mountain district? (Page 202) [There is doubt as to where this letter is continued from]

Mr. James [sic] has returned to Victoria. He certainly wanted to have something to do with the [--?] claim and went to Comox on two occasions, I believe, to look at it. We are still working along the outcrop above the No.1 lease and some of the coal coming from that place is good-looking stuff. We expect an increase of water and I trust the drains being [--?] at Park head will carry it off. We are experiencing a [--?] of money doing this and what we are getting out, we pay too much for. See the earnings of these men mining coal at ($1.70?) per ton (increased at that!). [--?] is paid the same as coal.

I heard from Alport a week ago. He said his wife now quite well and are beginning to speak better of Beaufort. They have a daughter born in May last. The [pipes] we have here are thought sufficient for quite a time- we are not expecting any more wood or iron will be needed till we deepen the mines or meet more water. The bottoms of the lower slopes are quite dry. I will [--?] shortly if anything new transpires.

In the meantime I remain dear Mr. Wild with kindest regards, yours very truly M. Bate

(Page 204)

(Page 203)

[This half of page is illegible]

In the heart of Nanaimo River I am almost positive there is no small [--?] just south of Chase River that we can never work to advantage.[?] shaft going down near Departure Bay will probably prove something is now only about four fathoms from the coal. I often think we are altogether too slow. Mr. Bryden, I am sorry to have to say it, does not seem to be taking the interest in our business that he might do also he appears very [-?] about everything [?]. Prior has a good deal to do and most important matters are left undone and unattended to. Mr. Prior for many months has had charge of the [?] yardage, etc. and [?]. Being young and little accustomed to [?] men we have assumed here he might [?]

I suppose he will get what he asks. Prior is most willing and anxious to do anything- in his power but he lacks experience I think and understanding [--?] differently bye and by.

(Page 204)

22 Sept 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have your kind favor of the 4th instant, and beg to thank you for your goodness in seeing Mr. Ewing regarding the compass purchased from him. Landale has the instrument away on one of the islands (Gabriola), which he is subdividing into sections for the government. So soon as I see him, I will explain what Mr. Ewing says. I believe, however, that he tried the end on the tripod, and I understood him to say it was too small for the Ball. In that case, perhaps the wrong tripod has been sent? Please do not trouble further till I look into the matter. Roper, I am of the opinion, knows nothing of “two new outcrops in this vicinity” - and about as much of Rippon’s affairs. I will try to see Roper who worked for us many years. He has settled on some land-160 acres I think some 6 or 7 miles from this in (Page 205) a direct line but it is well known the land where he is located contains coal of some sort.

I had a chat with Bichard here, and, if what he says is true, I agree that he has not been treated fairly by Wellington people. [Berryman?] & Doyle he said wanted to Charter his vessel at $4.00 per ton, but he is not inclined, apparently, to engage to them. Speaking of Fitzwilliam coal, which he thought he might want some of, I told him he must see you about it, and I have thought since you might, if you deem it advisable, to probably be able to get the best of his ships for a voyage or two at 4.00 per ton! Bichard does not speak at all complimentary of Dunsmuir’s dealings. From your having made arrangements with [Goedhall?], Nelson, & Perkins regarding the mail contract, I infer you have a notion of giving up that line of the business.

I am sorry to hear of further complaints about the coal sent to Acapulco from the Fitzwilliam mine. The last cargo per 'Star' I hope would turn out well. It was all carefully screened and I trust it was also freed of slate. There’s no doubt the new seam coal wants thorough cleaning. If you hear anything respecting the ‘Arkwright’ cargo, favorable or otherwise, please to let me know.

I do not forget to remember you and Mrs. Bermingham to Emily and Alport. As they promise to write often we expect soon to hear from them again.

There is no improvement reported from the Harewood nor have we any change for the better in our prospects at Fitzwilliam Slope. We are not doing much exploring there just now. Could you please let me know the price at San Francisco of round-nosed gravel shovels per dozen? I presume we ought to get them as cheap through you as we get them from England.

Hoping you are well and hearty and with best regards of myself and Mrs. Bate,

I remain

yours very sincerely

M. Bate.

(Page 206)

23 Sept 1874

Nanaimo

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Heisterman

Many thanks for your kind favor of the 21st. Messrs Drake & Jackson have sent me a copy of the affidavit of Mr. C. A. Elliott, which in the mildest language, I must characterize as false. Mr. Elliott was up here a month ago staying with Capt. Egerton.

I enclose your copy of my affidavit stating what I did say, and it so happens that there was another person present while we were talking viz, Mr. [Levensen?] who I think will do me the justice to say that my whole remark went to show how amazed and annoyed I was at the conduct of Shakespeare. If you think it worthwhile, as I do, you may (cautiously of course) approach Mr. [Levensen?] and see if he will not corroborate what I have just said i.e.- that I was vexed at Shakespeare’s doings. I believe he will do so. Mr. [Levensen?] remarked at the time that he understood you were my agent and he named a sum which he said you informed him you were to bid. That need not be brought up, but if he would do me any good, as you might perhaps advise him, please attend to him and let Mr. Jackson know if his evidence is valuable.

By next mail, I am expecting to hear from London, and on receipt of my letter, I will write you again about securing the property.

The Lodge room will look nice when finished.

With best regards, and again thanking you for your kindness.

I am

most truly yours

M. Bate

P.S. Capt. Clarke will likely remember how annoyed I was at Shakespeare. He was present I believe when I gave Shakespeare “a bit of my mind”. It is all important I think to show by these parties that I had not the remotest wish to puff up the price- that a fixed figure was not to be exceeded.

(Page 207)

Sept 23 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria

 

Gentlemen

I am in receipt of your letter of the 17th inst, enclosing copy of an affidavit of Mr. A. C. Elliott, the third paragraph of which I regret to have to state, is not in accordance with the facts. What Mr. Elliott might have understood I said, or meant, and what I did say are different matters: I am surprised that he made such a deduction as that sent to me. Capt. Egerton was not, I believe, the next highest bidder to Mr. Shakespeare. That, however, is of no consequence excepting to show Mr. Elliott is wrong there also.

Herewith I forward an affidavit in reply to that of Mr. Elliott, and I am thankful you obtained an adjournment of the case to give us an opportunity of correcting the wrong impression that document might tend to convey.

I am gentlemen yours very truly

M. Bate.

Private

If Mr. Jackson thinks it advisable the enclosed letter might be read in connection with the affidavit.

M. Bate

 

(Page 208)

1st. Oct. 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Mr. Heisterman

I am under obligation for your kind letter of the 28th ultimo.

Your judgment of the value of Mr. Levensen’s testimony is probably the correct one; but I can positively declare that I said nothing more, when talking to Capt. Egerton, than I have stated in my affidavit that is: that he might take the property for aught I had to with it. I sincerely hope the matter will terminate as you expect. I must confess, however, I have some misgivings as to the judge’s order.

Your expenses I shall not for a moment object to pay.

I expected a letter from London by last steamer, but I did not get it. By next Tuesday’s mail it will almost sure to come to hand, and just as soon as I get the information I am anticipating, I will not fail to write you definitely with regard to the Rippon Estate.

In great haste and with best wishes, I am

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

 

(Page 209)

1st Oct. 1874

Private

Nanaimo

My Dear Clarke

I have two of your kind notes before me, and with regard to the acquisition of the [Union?] claim, let me say that I have written home on the subject - have made several suggestions bearing on the matter, and just as soon as I hear from London in reply, I will let you know exactly what we can do.

I know you must be tired waiting in such anxious suspense with regard to the sale, and what I told you some two years ago is now doubtless correct, that is, that you should have asked a price you could get and turned the shares into cash.

I am sure the Company would entertain any reasonable offer. (I mean reasonable in their estimation and they know something of the value of coal land in Vancouver) and it is a pity some of your co-partners in the Union do not see that by following their present course they are really [injuring?] the chance of a sale, and losing valuable time.

You do not state what coal you would wish the ‘Otter’ to get for you. The Island, Douglas, I would recommend, but if Capt. Lewis comes to Nanaimo I hardly expect he will [remove?]. Perhaps you told him where to go?

In great haste and with best wishes, I am

most truly yours

M. Bate

6 Oct. 1874

Strictly Private

Nanaimo B C.

My Dear Mr. Heisterman

I have before me your kind favor of yesterdays date. The 'Maude' leaves again in the morning but I must drop you a line or two.

My forebodings you perceive have turned out about correct. Why was the case postponed so long? I have an impression that the affidavit of Elliott was left to the last moment, to put the hearing off, and the final decision, or what ever you like to call it, was not given until after Judge Begbie’s visit to and return from the place!!

As to making me purchase, I agree with you that they can’t, unless some of them are kind enough to find me 95% of the money. I now am anxious to ascertain if there is means of getting the order, or decision, reversed. I suppose not? But to endeavour to make me responsible for that fool Shakespeare bidding, in the face of his own affidavit, seems beyond all reason, and surely as such a ‘finding’ as that of Mr. Crease in the matter was never heard of before.

I shall be on the lookout for you on the 20th and hoping for better news, and with best wishes

I am

yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 211)

6 Oct. 1874

Nanaimo BC.

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I regret to learn, by your favor of yesterday, that the sale of the Rippon Estate to Noah Shakespeare as my ‘agent’ was approved by Mr. Crease. How such a decision could be given in the face of Shakespeare’s own affidavit I am at a loss to comprehend, nor did I ever hear of such a rendering before. I suppose no question can now be raised on the point.

It is not unlikely a Bill will be filed; but I am pleased you are sanguine of the result. I rest assured I have the case in good hands, and hope the expense of carrying it through will not be the means of “breaking” me.

I am, gentlemen

yours very truly.

M. Bate

(Page 212)

6th Oct 1874

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have your kind favor of the 20th ultimo. Your opinion of Harewood is about the correct one as regards the character of the coal as far exposed and explored. The latest news from that quarter says nothing of improvement in the prospects.

Mr. Bichard surely must be mistaken about the quality of coal he saw at the Wellington wharf and mine? It is reported that he has chartered two of his vessels to Berryman and Doyle to freight Wellington coal to your city at $4.00 per ton. The miners at Dunsmuir’s place are predicting all sorts of things, water & etc during the winter, but they generally exaggerate whichever way they talk.

Probably the core samples will be of no use to [O?] Malcolm & Co., at the same time as they were promised a sample it might not be amiss to keep faith and let them (the sacks) go. Don’t you think so?

I do not hear so much “blowing” about the Wellington coal of late. With the exception of the ‘Leander’ nearly all the coasters come to us, and at times we would be best without them. Spratt has a long Bill against Dunsmuir Diggle & Co, which will partly account for the ‘Maude’ coaling at Departure Bay. The mail boat only got into port tonight at 7 o’clock and leaves again early in the morning, so I am writing this and other letters in great haste in order to catch the San Francisco mail steamer at Victoria. By today’s Victoria paper, I see the ‘Blue Jacket’ sailed yesterday for Nanaimo as she is a large vessel, nearly 1400 tons register I presume she is coming to us. I don’t think our neighbours could accommodate such a vessel.

I shall be glad to hear of Mr. Rosenfeld’s safe arrival and his family at San Francisco, and with best regards from Mrs. Bate and myself, and hoping yourself and family are well.

I remain

very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 214)

Strictly Private

12 Oct. 74

Messrs Nicholas and Francis

Mountain District, Nanaimo
 

Gentlemen

I have to thank you for your letter of the 1st ultimo, which was only delivered at the Post Office on the 29th!

May I now ask you to favor me with answers to the following queries:

First: Would you agree to give time for reference to England of the offer contained in your letter, and allow an exploration for coal to be made on your property - at this company’s expense, and a deposit of $500.00 to be made to you in addition, which $500.00 shall be absolutely forfeited to you if the arrangement we may come to is not carried out on our part?

Second: Would you prefer or be willing for an examination to be made on your land with a view to finding and mining coal by payment of a Royalty to you of so much per ton on the Coal extracted. All expenses, Sinking or Boring, as the case may be. Road making etc to be born by the Company, you, of course allowing sufficient ground for works and Roads.

I shall be glad of an answer left at the Company’s office.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen.

For the Vancouver Coal Mining & Land Co. Limited

M. Bate.

(Page 216)

10th October 1874

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island

My dear Mr. Nicol

Your kind letter of the 12th. of August reached me a short time ago through Mr. Robins, and I have carefully noted your remarks regarding the lots that were Bolton’s. Unfortunately the Books nor plans do not show that lot 4 was to be included in Bolton’s purchase. I send you enclosed a copy of the page (almost a facsimile) from the small book you refer to, and the entry in it would hardly seem to include lot 4. I think there is no doubt, however that even if the lot 4 was named to Bolton, that for some reason or other, probably as you say failing to fulfill his agreement to maintain the Slip or to pay up that lot was never bona fide sold. Indeed it does not seem that it could be, as had that been the case, Bolton would certainly have taken care to have it conveyed to him. The price paid for the 3 lots and named in the Deed is $600.00. The same amount as named in the certificate handed to the Bank which mentioned 4 lots, but it would be easy to stipulate as perhaps was done, that in taking off the one lot no reduction should be made in the purchase money unless some arrangement of that kind was come to. It is difficult to understand how the consideration money of the 3 lots is kept the same in the Deed as the 4 in the Certificate. The conclusion I have come to is that Bolton, under all the circumstances, did not buy lot 4 and that we must take the Conveyance to show what he really acquired.

It appears from the land office records at Victoria that no certificate of Improvement was issued for Mr. Bryden’s pre-emption claim at Departure Bay. A certificate stating that the necessary improvements had been made was signed by John Christie, and Mr. Bryden thinks it was put into the hands of Capt. Franklyn, and he heard nothing of it afterward. While upon this subject of land, I may remark that a question has arose about the boundary of your old Farm on the Delta of Nanaimo River. The property perhaps you will remember was bought from Jerome by [Wm.?] Barton who was (Page 217) killed at our Newcastle Douglas mine about two years ago, and his widow with two or three small children has resided on the farm ever since. Lately Mr. [Newhouse?] has been haying off the Indian Reserves up the River, and he makes the buildings you had erected appear on the Reserve. He tells me that an oblique line from the South East corner of the full section has apparently been run to the River upon the Reserve, but he says he has some recollection that you arranged with the Government and Indians about it. He told Mrs. Barton this, and she came to me the other day to ask if I knew your whereabouts and if I would have the kindness to mention the matter to you to see if you could possibly give any explanation that would assist her out of her difficulty. The poor woman is sadly put out; as she fears her buildings might have to be taken down for removal.

With reference to your Newcastle Town and Suburban Lots, I consider they were sold for less than their value. I would have given $100 for the lot near the bridge, but I thought you would do well to retain it a little while longer. I do not think the right numbers were given to the lots when they were advertised. I compared the number in the paper with those given in one of your letters, and they did not agree, Dr. Ash, who was the purchaser, asked me when I was in Victoria lately, $200 for the Suburban Lot alone. The $127.50 I collected from Mr. Allsop and Credit Head office with 115.00 the balance of $12.50 has been expended as you desired. The fencing of little James’ grave has been given two coats of paint-cleaned inside and out, the brickwork repaired, and the head stone which had fallen to one side has been set firm and upright. Our little cemetery is now nigh well filled. Within the last month two old Nanaimo Residents have been laid there. Robert Fulton who married a servant of yours -a daughter of J. Dickson, and Richard Haslam who was killed by a fall of roof in the mine. There have been other deaths the last few weeks of persons unknown to you.

We have just heard from Emily and Alport again. They appear to be getting on nicely, and have now a daughter to tend to. Emily changed in appearance greatly the (Page 218) last few months she was at home. She began to look quite womanly all at once. Our family has increased since you left. We have 4 boys and five girls. Spaldings, Coopers, and other old residents are still here. The town continues to grow and many new buildings are going up, some of them not wanted. I allude to two new Hotels. When those two are finished we shall have no less than six drinking places in a line within a distance of 450 yards. Licenses are granted by Capt. Spalding without any regard to the wants of the place, and it seems a great pity that there should be so many inducements put in men’s way to drink. It is a great drawback to workers, and an injury to the Community generally.

We are having another change of minister in our church. The new gentleman is a Mr. Mason, lately archdeacon of [?]. He is a preacher of the Garrett stamp - does not use manuscript or notes, and he discourses fervently and eloquently.

A fine new public school is erected at the site promised some years ago on Crace Street, and we have an organization of Militiamen - 40 in number. This you might have noticed in the papers I sent you.

Our works are moving along at the usual steady gait. We have not got through the wait in the Douglas seam on Newcastle Island, and it is not an easy matter to conjecture even how much farther it will extend in any direction. The great pitch workings at Douglas pit are progressing favourably, although the winding is rather an awkward business. The B Slope, however, having been deepened we shall in a week or two have a road connecting the Pitch with the slope and the winding will then be all done up the latter. The Railway Bridge has become quite shaky. It has stood well nearly ten years without additional propping, but now we have to put under new trestles altogether. The small piece beyond the weigh house we have filled with [pit ashes?]

Mr. Bryden, Mr. Sabiston and others have asked to be kindly remembered to you and requesting to accept for yourself and Mrs. Nicol the kind regards of Mrs. Bate and myself. I remain

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 219)

19th Oct. 1874

Nanaimo

Mr. Louis Page
San Francisco

 

Dear Sir.

You will perhaps be surprised to learn that Mr. Galbraith has presented a Bill to the Institute Committee for painting the Building!! He says, I believe, that you went away owing him money, and that the contract was his - that you did not settle with him, and he now wants the Institute to give him $115.00. As you represented there was an understanding between you, that you were partners in fact, as I believe you were, in the tender, I should be greatly obliged to you if you would be good enough to inform me by the earliest opportunity if Mr. Galbraith is right in wanting us to pay him after we have paid you.

I am sure, from what I have known of you for many years, that you will not wish to be misrepresented nor consent to see any injustice done the Institute Committee, much less see them imposed upon.

Kindly give me all the explanation you think fit that it should not be thought you had collected money wrongly.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

P.S. Mr. Webb is under the impression that you settled matters satisfactory with Mr. Galbraith.

(Page 220)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am exceedingly sorry to hear of the disaster to the ‘Shooting Star'. We do not know any more particulars here than are given by Broderick, and he does not say where the vessel struck. It shut down very foggy the morning Capt. Austin left and I was almost afraid he would not get out of the Gulf without mishap. You will of course be telegraphed to for instructions if Austin is unable to proceed. The ‘Star’ has on board 1030 tons this trip. When the Capt. came to the office to sign the B/Lading we had not the weight given in. He told the mate however to take aboard just a thousand tons, but by some means they took 30 tons over.

(Page 221) The wharf in our Wellington neighbours being low they will have quite a job to load the ‘Blue Jacket’ Those vessels going to Departure Bay carry all the freight for the mine free. Would not Pope & Talbot serve us in that way? We should not trouble them much at any rate. I fear the memorandums I sent for to the telegraph office at Victoria are not always promptly delivered by the steam boat Captain. I generally send by the “Iago” or the ‘Emma’ if the mail boat is not in port or about due.

Should you be passing the shop from which the surveying Compass was obtained perhaps you would kindly tell Mr. Ewing that the wrong tripod has evidently been sent. I saw [N----] the other day which is twice as heavy nearly as the tripod Landale has.

We heard again from Emily last week. They are getting along nicely, and they ask to be kindly remembered to you and Mrs. Bermingham.

I am much obliged for the information about Shovels. We shall send an order very soon. I suppose Mr. Rosenfeld will have arrived by the time this reaches you. I shall send him a small sack or two of potatoes for his family by the [?Parke] They will be an agreeable change from those raised in California. If you are not putting up at any hotel, I should like to send you some potatoes? I will send them anyhow if you can use them.

In great haste, and with best wishes in which Mrs. Bate joins

I am yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 222)

Private

29 Oct. 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Mr. Clarke

I have filled in the blank promissory note for one thousand dollars ($1,000) and duly signed it, making it payable in thirty days from this date. All that will be necessary, I presume, to make the note acceptable to the Bank will be your endorsement. I am sending one paper with share Certificates please mention the time you would wish to have to redeem the mortgage and make interest payable to me at the rate of 8% per annum. I hope that by promptly meeting the note at maturity I shall relieve you of any embarrassment you might have felt.

We got a large stock of oats last week from a second sector at 1 1/4c. For [-?] and first class hay at [$17.50] per ton.

If Capt Lewis wants coal for your account he shall be supplied.

I see no mention in the paper of Mrs. Franklyn’s arrival at Victoria, so I suppose she has not yet reached you.

This is a very busy day with me so I close with best regards and am

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 223)

28 Oct. 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

I have to acknowledge and to thank you for your kind letter of the 19th September. As I mentioned in my official letter, when the “strike” concerning Dr. Jones ended, there was nothing said upon any other subject to annoy us in any way. The men were perfectly satisfied when they got rid of the Doctor, and they were only a few days in settling down and getting steadily to work. A change in our fortune I am always anxiously hoping for. The force of the remarks of shareholders touching our shortness of yield I cannot help feeling, and I am not at all easy about the great expense we are put to in making our small extract. The pay sheets however will show the hands we have around, and where they are employed. I frequently object to the (what seems to me) expensive methods of carrying on some parts of our work, especially the payment of such a host of miners by the day. I know full well shift work does not pay and I am for avoiding it wherever and wherever we can. Mr. Bryden is now getting a bore put down, as I reported last week, on the Winfield Crescent- a little to the dip of the Level Adit, but not as far to the dip as the Park head Slopes went down, hence I can not see what information we shall gain by sinking this bore. We know the coal is there and how deep it is to a foot or two, but a hole in the back of the ridge, to say as at the beach near, or in front of, Mr. Bryden’s house, or between his house and the workshops, would be more to the point, in fact a shaft a little south of this locality may some time be decided upon, and that before long. We ought, I think, to have more mines in operation, and I trust the Board will authorize spirited action at the (Page 224) west of the Nanaimo River during the next year.

As I acquaint the Board, Mr. Bulkley is coming rather nearer our Nanaimo River Section, but he has none of his Douglas Coal as far as I can make out, and will consequently depend entirely upon the lower seams which, without doubt is not to be relied on either as regards, quality, thickness, or regularity. I have seen the discoverer of the outcrop of coal near Cranberry Lake, who tells me he is forbidden by other parties who are interested in the land, to say anything about it without their consent. Specimens of the coal were shown to me, of very good quality for croppings but as to thickness or other particulars I could glean nothing. The edge (outcrop) of the Douglas seam I believe is a little to the East of Cranberry Lake. The lower seam tails out to the West of the lake.

That the Board will try to do something to acquire land containing coal to the North of us I am very glad to hear. It is true we have a pretty large extent of ground already, but a good portion of it is most likely barren of mineral- at all events of a workable seam. As to the Union claim, I judge from conversations I have had with one or two members of our local Parliament that steps might be taken to compel holders of such lands to make use of them instead of keeping them for speculation. I still think we should not be wrong in buying a [1/11?] interest or two if we can secure these at $2,500 to $3,000. My idea is that if we could get a few shares at that rate we should soon get them, and again, don’t you think it probable that hearing the Vancouver Coal Company were interested some of the parties who contemplated purchasing might become [ch--?]. The Cornishmen, as we call Nicholas & Francis, have under consideration a letter of mine relating to our examination of their Estate and the getting of coal on a payment of Royalty supposing a good workable seam were found. I had a short friendly chat with Mr. Nicholas two days ago who assured me they had been made a bona fide offer of the sum named in their note to (Page 225)

me, and said Mr. Nicholas “I will bring in the letter and show to you”. He also stated that he knew who would give $24,500.00 for the Rippon Estate, or an advance of $2500 on the sum bid by Shakespeare, and I judge by references he made to Victoria, that it’s some person there he alluded to. That great blunder of Shakespeare has caused me no little perplexity I assure you. I would have hardly thought such a mistake possible. The Judge and lawyers have the Estate in such a fix. I imagine that they will make the most of it. Our Judges, by the way, are not considered quite free from corruption. More than once I have heard the integrity of their actions called in question, but of course I have nothing to say upon such a subject. Were it not that I think you will believe me incapable of doing anything, knowingly to affect prejudicially the company’s interest I should like to give you some observations on the letter of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. They know too well I never am remiss in (Page 226) the performance of any duty I owe to my employers. That to serve the Company faithfully is my sole desire, and nothing they can say or do will deter me from looking first to the prosperity of our works and business. I do not mean to say they wish us any harm, but certain it is they are becoming quite impudent and elated with their success, for it cannot be denied they are doing well in their mining department, and obtaining, as I have before mentioned to you, a higher price for their coal at the wharf than we do for ours sent to San Francisco.

Fitzwilliam Mine, I trust, will yet do something for us. We have hopes of the coal coming in on the East side where we are heading. I begin to wonder if we cannot do something with the great quality of shale or slate and clay we have in the mine in the way of brick making? We have hundreds of tons banked and a seam of the thickness of six to fifteen feet in the mine.

Our account for the first three months of this half year, I regret to state will be far from satisfactory. Mining costs (Page 225) are climbing higher than ever. I am much distressed at seeing so much cash paid away for mining so little coal. The men in No 1 Level, I consider are paid at least 2/5 cents per ton too much, for the coal they get. We never used to pay more than 1.32 per ton for the upper level coal sent out clean i.e. riddled. We are now paying 1.75 per ton for it unscreened delivered to where the mules can go for it. More than 3 months ago ,in speaking to Mr. Bryden on this subject, he said, “It’s no use making any alteration now. We shall have all the coal out (of No1 level) within the next six weeks.” You will be pleased to note by my official letter of today the good character of the coal coming from the No 5 south Level and Patch. It really looks well in the heap.

Last week I heard again from Alport and his wife. They are quite well, seem comfortable and contented. We have photos (Page 226) of myself and Mrs. Bate that we want to send to them. We also wish to send them a Piano (a wedding present) from London. I have thought I would ask if you would kindly consent to the Photos (in a case) being sent to your care or to that of Mr. Robins? They would require to go to Mr. Robert Whyte 21 Duke St. Aldgate who is P.I. Alport & Co’s agent in London and who I believe will promptly attend to shipment to Beaufort, and if you (or Mr. Robins in your absence) would please accept a commission to buy a Piano I shall feel very thankful. I will write particulars on hearing from you on the subject. Our Wellington neighbours have a fine large ship to load that is expected to carry away over 2000 tons.

I remain

Dear Mr. Wild

With kindest regards

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 227)

4 Nov 1874

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Heisterman

With regard to the Lots on Victoria Crescent. I did omit to refer to them in my last letter. You will recollect I told you that applications had been made for them and in one instance that refusal is asked for at three times the price named to you last year. How unfortunate you did not buy! I presume you will care for them at the figure they will now fetch. Can you mention any Lots in other locations you would like to have?

Mr. Young is not leaving.

At the first meeting of the Building committee I will try to get a settlement of your account.

With best wishes

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 228)

5th. Nov 74

N.J. Jones Esq.
Savannah Georgia
 

My Dear Sir.

Your letter of the 12th. of September has duly reached me. I have been waiting for some time in anticipation of hearing from you so that I might know where to address you. In your last you mentioned that you expected to leave Savannah, but it seems you are there still. I will therefore wait no longer, but make up your account and send [?] I have just as soon as I can get a cheque from Victoria. You may look for a letter which will follow this very shortly.

Your property is all right. Though the small house is in a very shaky condition, and I hardly think it is worth making any great expenditure upon it. The chimney is tumbling down the veranda ditto and the whole structure looks as though it would topple over. Fiddick says he will give $250 for the lot and Building as it stands. He is going to leave the house to take up a farm, and when he does leave a tenant I am afraid will not be forthcoming.

Please say what I shall do (Page 229 in the matter? Rebuild the chimney and patch up the house, or let it stand till you come this way? Or if you think it advisable to sell I would endeavour to get a higher price than Fiddick offers. We are moving along here with usual steadiness. Every body seems disappointed that the Canadians are backing out of building the “Canadian Pacific Railway”, and on all sides almost, people are regretting that British Columbia ever confederated with Canada. Having got into a fix, we shall doubtless have to remain in it.

I am glad to hear that Mrs. Jones and yourself were well. Myself, Mrs. Bate and all our family I am thankful to say are in the enjoyment of good health, and asking you to accept our kindest regards.

I remain

Yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 230)

12 Nov 1874

Private

Nanaimo B.C.

My Dear Clarke

I was too busy to drop you a line last week, but I must write today to thank you for your kind note of the 9th.

In the first place I must say I am exceedingly obliged for your goodness re that auction affair, but as to making me pay they can’t, unless they give me 95% of the money. I neither stopped the sale nor authorized any one else to bid to the absurd figure that man Shakespeare named. I know a few people, who will give me all the trouble and put me to all the expense they can. Being, however, conscious that I have done nothing to deserve the annoyance they would give me, I rest assured if justice is done, I shall not be completely annihilated! Had I purchased and attempted as Dr. A said to wiggle out of it, I might consider his remarks justifiable, but I neither purchased nor told Shakespeare to do it. It is contrary to all reason Law or Equity to try to hold me accountable for the blunder the fellow committed, especially in the face of his own affidavit wherein he swears I told him “he may bid as high as $5,000- but no higher etc. etc. and I did not employ him in the capacity of an agent. I know the property would fetch more than I told him he might bid, hence my speaking to him at all, of course I am not going quietly to submit to being robbed. I understand, or fancy I do, a little of what our courts are like and I have very little faith (let me tell you in strictest confidence) in their integrity. Any information you can glean on the subject I shall be glad if you will communicate to me.

It is impossible for me at present to loan you another thousand dollars. I understand that [$1,000?] would do you, and I did not mind at a little inconvenience to myself to help you. Please send me the promised security.

We heard again from Beaufort this week. All are well. I should like to send a small case by the 'Lady Gertrude'. Do you think she will go to the Cape of Good Hope?

With best wishes

Yours most sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 231)

12 Nov 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

Herewith I forward my deposit Receipt for $2500.00 duly endorsed, and beg to request that you will kindly send me that amount, and the interest $125.00 by the ‘Maude’ in charge of Capt. Holmes on Tuesday next.

Please forward the whole sum in notes, and greatly oblige

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 232)

12 Nov 1874

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

My Dear Sir.

Yours of the 9th inst. with enclosed cheque is duly to hand with thanks. Mr. Eckstein now owes two more months rent viz October & November.

I am sorry I cannot give an answer about the Lots today. The man who asked for the refusal of them is away at present, but may probably be here next week. If not, I will send you the sketch you ask for that you might see the positions and sizes & etc. The lot next to Levis store (as was) is Leased and has a butcher shop upon it. All at once there is a rush for Lots in Victoria Crescent.

Mr. J. Hirst is about to build the first stone warehouse etc on Front Street near the old Bastion. I recommended him to Mr. Trounce to prepare the plans etc.

I expect to be in Victoria very shortly, and shall not fail to call at your office.

With best regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

I am

yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 233)

!8 Nov. 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

I have safely received and have to thank you for sending by the ‘Maude’ the amount of my deposit and Interest at your Bank viz: $2625.00.

The secty of our Masonic Building Committee was told to send $30. Interest on Mr. Pemberton’s loan last month, but as he has not apparently done so I will send a cheque for the amount herewith.

Last week a cheque book came addressed to Dunsmuir Diggle & Co but I could not find the one sent to me.

All is well among us here. We have a most gratifying change, as you will doubtless hear, in church matters. Mr. Mason will change matters. Mr. Mason will prove all that you predicted.

Our shipments of coal are rather slack lately. We are accumulating large heaps on the surface. We are getting from Home a Diamond steam Boring machine.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

N.C. Ward Esq.

 

(Page 234)

18 Nov. 1874

Nanaimo

J. Rowland Hall Esq.

Victoria

Dear Sir.

I have your letter of the 16th instant.

It is unfortunate for me that a difficulty has arisen regarding the Cable, Riggings etc. from the ‘Panther’ landed on our company’s wharf, because the pier is completely [encumbered?] up with the articles and I shall be compelled to request and do request of the removal of the whole lot forthwith.

Mr. Dyer, with whom I made the arrangement for landing the goods, agreed to send them away by the first San Francisco bound ship if they were not previously disposed of in the Sound. I cannot see I have any right whatever to retain the things. They are not in my custody. Beyond the accommodation of finding room for their deposit, I have had nothing to do or say about them.

If I can do anything to assist you and in the interest of Capt. Gilbert it will be I think by having the chain & etc. moved off the wharf on a ballast heap in-shore where they will not be so easily got at. We shall not be willing for the great weight now on the wharf to remain after the termination of the present month at farthest.

I am, dear Sir

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 235)

18 Nov. 1874

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.

Victoria

My Dear Sir,

There is still a “hitch” about those Lots. It seems there is more than one person interested in the contemplated purchase. I have made it understood that a decision must be come to quickly

A sketch of Lots on Victoria Crescent please find enclosed. Those colored red are unsold. A patch of lot 1 say 40 feet square is leased for 2 years. A House which should have been built on Lot 8 projects into Lot 9 and any one taking the latter would get it subject to a sale, to the owner of Lot 8, of the few feet built upon, on the same terms as bought from the Company.

I am

My dear Sir in great haste,

Very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 236)

25 Nov. 1874

Nanaimo

Mr. Louis Page,
San Francisco
 

Dear Sir.

I was pleased to get your letter of the 1st. inst. and the particulars that accompanies it.

As I think I before told you, Galbraith sued the Institute Committee for the amount of the tender which he signed, which he swore was his and that you had nothing to do with it. Of course none of us believed that, but as you were not here to contradict what he said Capt. Spalding made out that we must pay Galbraith the amount of his tender less the value of the work he did perform according to the specifications. Don’t you know anything about that specification? I would be very glad if you could tell me what became of it. Galbraith also swore that he had not received any money from you. Did you get receipts for the $5.00 and $50.00 you paid him as shown in the statement of account you sent me? If you got receipts let me have them. I fully understand your letter etc and believe your statement to be true. I asked Galbraith in court how it was, if he claimed to be the contractor, that you furnished all the material, hired labor and worked on the building yourself? Oh! He said he had been helping you at the Wesley parsonage, and you and your men (Page 237)

lent him a hand on that account. The whole of his story is no doubt false, but it requires you to prove it, and the Committee desires me to say that they are anxious for you to come up for a trip and they will pay $50.00 of your expenses so that justice should be done. I will guarantee the $50.00 is paid to you just as soon as the case is decided after your evidence. We should, I think, be able to have the case brought up anew. By all means come up and see that we are not wronged. I will give you a week or fortnight’s work papering and painting in my house to help to pay for your trouble I don’t like being cheated by Galbraith.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

2nd.December 74

Nanaimo

My Dear Sir

Herewith please find cheque for $1,000 to take up my acceptance for that amount which lies at your Bank. I hope you have not been inconvenienced by receiving the cheque yesterday.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

N.C. Ward Esq.

Manager

Bank B.C.

(Page 238)

2nd, Dec 1874

Private

Nanaimo

R. C. Reithel Esq.
Victoria
 

My Dear Sir.

How do you make me out to be indebted to Levi's Estate to the amount of $1027.62? I owe Levi nothing more than a few dollars (about ten I think) for groceries etc of which I have not been able to obtain particulars. Can you let me have a Bill of the goods, and I will pay at once.

Mr. Charles wants an offer for a coal charter for the 'Brierley Hill' to San Francisco. Please telegraph to Mr. Rosenfeld enquiring what we can offer? Tell him Wellington folks want the vessel.

In great haste

Yours very truly

M. Bate.

2. Dec. 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen.

In reply to your letter of the 30th ultimo I beg to state that I am not indebted to the Estate of S D Levi beyond a few dollars (perhaps $10) for groceries an account of which I have asked for several times. I will promptly pay the amount, however on the receipt of a proper Bill.

I am

Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 239)

2nd. Dec 1874

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman, Esq
Victoria
 

My Dear Sir.

I expected to take a trip to Victoria by the steamer but at the last moment I find I cannot leave here. No satisfactory answer has been given to me with respect to that lot on Victoria Crescent. I will therefore state that you can purchase it at $900. Just as soon as I can get away for a day or two, I shall visit your city.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 240)

2nd. Dec. 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

About a month ago, I had the pleasure of writing to you and last week I received your very welcome letter of the 24th. of October, the contents of which I perused with much interest. We still, I am sorry to say, are without any material change for the better in the state of our affairs generally. Cost of labor and cost of material, in connection with our low output, and the reduction of funds at Home, begin to alarm me. I have perceived in the advance of tonnage rates, increases in numbers of jobbing hands occupied etc. How gradually we have been falling into our present unhealthy condition, and although I often point out what I apprehend to be a remedy, and my colleague seems to agree with me, the cure is not applied. Of course were I to order a thing to be done, as I feel like doing, after it is long neglected, matters might come, so to speak, to a “dead lock”. I endeavour, however, by all means to avoid seeming annoyed and try, by gently reminding Mr. Bryden, that such and such a matter has been overlooked, or what not, to get attention directed to it. To be sure we have had an unlooked for barrier to our progress in the event at the Fitzwilliam mine, nor do I for a moment forget the disaster caused by the Flooding of No 4 Level, now nearly two years ago, but our current expenses, chargeable to coal [?]. (Page 241) I think should be reduced instead of increased.

We ought for instance to [?] or pump water to the slope head from the Pit head in lieu of paying during the dry summer months- $250 per month as we do for casting it in a barge! We also ought to have a mule in the No 5 level to do the hauling or running work of 6 or 8 Chinamen etc. I do hope I shall be enabled ere long to write more encouragingly of our future. The miners in my opinion should have been kept to the terms of the agreement made with them on the resumption of work in April 1871. As it is, they have all the advantage when the coal is thick by being given full price and they get extra when the coal is thin.

At Harewood, you will observe by my official letters, the seam begins to look more promising. While we have been “scratching” about the shaft bottom the men engaged by Mr. Bulkley have driven ahead nearly 400 yards in one direction, and have, at this time, it is said, every inducement to advance still further: they have done a deal of work at the Harewood in the short time exploration has been going on there. Mr. Bulkley has finally decided to bring his Railway to Nanaimo. I hardly think we shall be able to prevent him getting Cameron Island. To reach it he will have a difficult and, I believe rather expensive road to construct. Not withstanding his idea that the Company would not be losers by giving him right of way etc. free. By his coming to Nanaimo Harbour, we shall make the most we can of Mr. Bulkley and keep him in suspense on questions of detail, pending the opinion of the Board. I have always had a notion that Mr. Bulkley did not want to go to Departure Bay for a place of shipment. His intentions were I imagine to come out near [B---] (Page 243)

old “ways” but he could not get there without considerable extra outlay, and crossing much more of our town site than he now proposes to do.

As regards the “Union” and other Comox Coal claims I have reason to think our neighbours of Departure Bay have agents after one or more of them or after land to the South of Comox. At present they are not perhaps overburdened with funds, but as they are going on they will be in a better position as time proceeds, and probably the Bank of B.C. may be a little accommodating in case of need as heretofore. To see them succeed as they have done, while we are going almost backwards has not been at all pleasing to me. I do not mean to state that I envy them their success exactly- what I should like to see is this: suppose they...(Page 242: overwritten and blurred)

[----] tons a day, as reported, that we should raise 300 tons daily. To refer to the Union Claim, I make out that to buy at the price asked [--------] about the sum [-------] our Company Capital would be needed. I will give you my figures. Officially likely I want to submit these to my colleagues.

That Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. are at work to get Rippon’s lot I [am fairly?] certain. Rumor says they are now mining beyond their line! I propose if a favorable opportunity offers shortly to take a trip to Victoria where I may learn something more respecting the Estate that has been made known to me. Expect waiting to inform me that the Judge approved of Shakespeare as my agent; the lawyers have not referred to the subject since the decision order was [given?].

You will notice the lower seam is producing a little more coal, and I am (Page242) much of your opinion of our prospects here. Surely looking at the lower coal as I term it, I am [-] found in some other place. We must have a good spot in one place or another?. And we might persevere in our search by following often promises we will get. [-------] the shaft bottom.

The pay slips will show how the men are employed.

Our attorney general Mr. G. H. Walkem has been in London for the last year or three, I believe. I suppose you have not met him? He is a very popular man [--?] and of great power in the government. You may yet see him ere he [leaves?] London.

Mr. De Cosmos was up here a week or two ago. I had quite a chat with him about Texada Island etc, and he in course of our conversation asked me

(Page 243) if I thought our people would listen to any proposal regarding the Iron ore of that island? I told him we might easily ascertain by addressing the matter to the Directors at Home or by communicating through me. Texada iron will be of immense value some day. The Government of the Dominion would perhaps grant a bounty to the first iron makers in the Province.

I had proposed to send [--?] to Mr. Alport, and at the suggestion of Mr. Alport who thought you would kindly undertake to [purchase?] I alluded to the [-?] in my last letter to you. If you can oblige me without any inconvenience to yourself, by ordering a good piano suitable for transportation to Beaufort. I shall be much pleased. I mean a good instrument as far as the machinery and material are concerned. A case richly embellished. …It concerns directions for shipping the piano to the Cape and “to be addressed or marked thus; P. I. Alport & Co Beaufort West - Bay. Cape of Good Hope. “It should be sent to Mr. Robert [--?] 21 Duke St. Aldergate, London. [--?]. Alport says it will be perfectly safe and will promptly attend to it

(Page 242) [Crosswritten]

You would have the goodness to call and see him on the subject of shipping & etc. Alport has probably [-- ?] his brother fully respecting the [--?]. As the payment if you can manage to charge me the cost in the Company’s account I shall be [-?] but if that is not wholly satisfactory I will promptly remit to yourself or to the secretary the amount of the bill. As to price will not be here or there. As long as a good piano is obtained. The photographs before spoken of I can send direct to Mr. [--?] address if you should see that gentleman to inform him of it.

This has been a very busy day with making up monthly statement, writing to the Board and working to [--?] have kept me [--?] and I [--?] by the excuse.

With best regards and hoping that you are quite well.

I remain dear Mr. Wild most truly yours M. Bate.

(Page 244)

4th. Dec 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham.

I owe you an acknowledgment and thanks for two of your kind favors. Landale is surveying on Gabriola Island, but so soon as I meet with him I will let him know what Ewing says about the tripod. I almost think he has had it altered by tapping the socket (for Jacobs staff) to fit the screw on the tripod. I am not sure about it however.

I am sorry to hear the potatoes did not keep sound. Those I had for our own use from the same place and person I thought were first rate. We will try another brand.

It is always at the request of Broderick etc when we send other than Fitzwilliam coal (page 245) for the ‘Los Angeles.’ Sometimes, they are in a great hurry to get a cargo down in time, and it is then they ask that the vessel be loaded at Nanaimo.

The ‘Arkwright’ is staying with us quite a period this trip. She arrived on the 19th ultimo and did not get all the ballast out till the 30th. On the 1st and 2nd, the ship could not lay at the shute all day owing to high tide, but up to last evening we had 700 tons aboard, and now there are signs that the hatches will soon be blocked. Capt. Hayden has gone to Victoria. Something about the deserters and boat stolen.

Poor Capt. Avery of the ‘Atlanta’ I am afraid will not live to reach San Francisco. He was exceedingly ill when he left here, and apparently suffering intense pain. We can do with an extra ship just now. Our funds at Bank are down and I want to raise them, and of course-it can only be done by a little increase in shipments. I have asked Rithet to telegraph to Mr. Rosenfeld about a charter for the ‘Brierley Hill’. The HBC Co. wrote [same?] for an offer.

Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and I

Yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 246)

9 Dec. 1874

Nanaimo

R. P. Rithet Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

I have to acknowledge and to thank you for yours of the 7th instant. Mr. Lewis informed me that I am indebted to his Estate $10.64, but whatever I owe for goods had at the store I will pay readily. I never had any cheque from Mr. Levi, and as that gentleman is now at Victoria, if you will kindly see him, you will confer on me a favor be asking for an explanation.

As we have no vessel on the way that I am aware of beside the ‘Shooting Star’ there is no doubt we shall be able to give the ‘Brierley Hill’ good dispatch, and we at once fall in with your suggestion to allow the vessel to bring our freight along (some 15 tons I believe) at current rates. I write respecting the goods to Messrs. Broderick & Co. who I had requested to transport them hither.

Trusting you may secure the ‘Brierley Hill’.

I am,

Dear Sir

Yours most truly.

M. Bate.

(Page 247)

10 Dec. 1874

Private

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq
Victoria
 

Dear Sir,

I have yours of the 7th and note that the lot on Victoria Crescent will not be bought by your friend yet awhile.

The proposed Harewood Railway is to come to Nanaimo Harbour, and not go to Departure Bay. We have numerous enquiries about Lots, in conveyance. The road it is thought will go between Dunsmuir’s house and Victoria Crescent.

I expect the value of Land to Mr. Bulkley will have to be settled by arbitration, and I so informed our Directors, and they name Mr. R. Broderick as a suitable person to act for us. I intended to nominate you, but I suppose I must pay some deference to the Board’s wishes in the matter.

By this steamer I write to Mr. Broderick to see if he can serve, if he cannot, may we name you as our arbitrator?

Keep the business strictly private please for the present.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 249)

24 Dec. 1874

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I am in receipt of your note of the 21st inst. and the accompanying ‘Bill of Complaint’, which I beg to return herewith.

Is it not too bad to harass me about that foolish blunder of Shakespeare? It is impossible for me to do anything in the way of “paying the purchase money” and under your advice I would wish to appeal against the decision given by Mr. Crease. Kindly advise me if my presence in Victoria will be necessary or of service and what course you propose to take as the matter now stands?

Please appear for me without fail. I never heard of such a business as is being made out of the stupid mistake of Shakespeare. To hold me, or attempt to hold me responsible for his bidding is what I think would never be tried of thought of in any other part of the world.

Kindly drop me a line by return steamer to say if I should have a personal interview with you.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

24 Dec. 1874

Nanaimo

My Dear Mr. Heisterman

You were appointed umpire in the matter to be settled between our Company and Mr. Bulkley, but as our terms etc. were met there has been no need to call on you. I have every confidence you would do us justice in any business you may undertake for us.

Please send me copy of your bill against the Building Committee. It will be paid at once.

Heartily reciprocating your kind wishes for Mrs. Bate as well as myself

Believe me, yours sincerely

M. Bate

30 Dec. 1874

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Heisterman

I have yours of the 26th inst and now enclose cheque for the amount of you’re a/c against the Building Association viz $29.50. I also enclose a cheque for twelve hundred and thirty dollars ($1230?) to take up our loan (& Interest) from Mr. J.D. Pemberton.

Kindly obtain the Mortgage Insurance policy etc. and send me by return steamer. Perhaps it would be well to cancel the Registry of Mortgage?

You are right in the name of the person who bought the lot in Victoria Crescent.

Heartily reciprocating & thanking you for your good wishes.

Believe me, sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 251)

30 Dec. 1874

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

Referring to my letter of last week (24th inst) I now beg to request you to resist on my behalf, every attempt to hold me responsible for that great error of Shakespeare, and to appeal against every decision throwing the onus on me. Have the goodness to give me notice that I may attend should the matter come up in Court.

I am, Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

 

(Page 252)

30th Dec. 1874

Nanaimo B. C.

My Dear Mother

I thank God that you have been enabled to write me a short note. How it gladdened my heart to receive it! And to know that you had improved in health caused me to weep for joy.

I merely write this short note to send you half a sovereign; next week if all is well, I will send a larger sum. The half sovereign has been given to me by Lucy, who like myself, was overjoyed when she knew a few lines had come from you. She will write to you, she says, at once.

We are all well, my little Sally has gone to Comox to spend the Holiday with her Aunt Elizabeth, and Adam Horne is staying with us for a week or two.

Sincerely hoping that you will regain strength, and that I shall hear from you again before long, and asking you to accept the best love of Sarah Anne and all the little ones.

I am, my dear mother

Your loving Son.

Mark.

(Page 253)

Nanaimo

30 Dec. 1874

John Jessop Esq.

Superintendent of Education

Victoria

Dear Sir

Your favor of the 19th did not reach me till the 22nd and the Trustees had, a week before your letter got here, decided to appoint Mr. R. E. Green, who was well recommended, but who, I see by the paper, has not been granted the necessary certificate.

You doubtless wrote on the subject, though unfortunately put in the letter addressed to me a letter intended for a lady at Salt Spring Island. I return the letter in question and probably shall get the one written for myself by next steamer.

Mrs. Young called on me today to say they had not had salary for November. I promised, just to mention the matter to you, and hinted that you might send two months salary next week.

Wishing you the compliments of the season.

I am

Dear Sir

yours very truly.

M. Bate

 

(Page 254)

Jan 6 75

My Dear David

About a week ago I received your kind note of the 18th November enclosing a few lines from my dear Mother, which I need hardly tell you I was delighted to receive.

From what I heard from one or two friends I had supposed my good old Mother would never pen a line to me again. Imagine therefore what a thrill of pleasure I felt to see her familiar hand writing once more! I hope she may gain a little strength, and be able to send me more short notes hereafter. I have at hand two of your welcome letters, beside that now under acknowledgment, but I do not at this time intend to answer them. I am just writing to send you 5 pounds to reimburse you for the expenses you incur on my account in sending me papers, Books etc. I think all your transit comes safely here.

I cannot describe to you on this small sheet the many duties which fall upon me – some of (Page 255) which I have voluntarily assumed but these unofficial positions take up all my leisure hour - at least what should be such. Only last evening, a deputation was sent to ask me to allow myself to be placed in ‘Nomination” for the mayoralty of our town which has been incorporated quite recently. I wondered, what next? President of the Literary Institute; Chairman of the School Board; Justice of the Peace, Leader of an Amateur Band etc. etc. etc. Surely they wanted to work me to death! This Mayor business I must decline. There are other gentlemen who want the office, and I don’t want it.

You shall have a portrait of Emily and her husband with this letter. They were quite well when we last heard from them. All our family are well I am glad to state. Little Sallie has been away at her Aunt Horne’s to spend her holidays. Mark wanted to go but I could not spare him.

Please give my love to all relatives particularly to your dear father and mother, and grandmother who doubtless is, as you say, “getting worse”. Remember us to all friends whom you meet and begging you to accept our best wishes for yourself.

Believe me I remain

your affectionate Cousin

M. Bate

P. S. I have received copies of the “Graphic” from Thomas Hughes, for which kindly thank him on my behalf. I write a few lines to my dear Mother by this opportunity. Be good enough to let her know and convey our best love to her.

(Page 256

Nanaimo

7 Jan 1875

My Dear Mother

Last week I wrote you a few lines to send you half a sovereign which Lucy gave me to forward, and now according to promise I send you 5 pounds which I sincerely hope will be used in such a way as will be of benefit to you. I can see, my dear Mother, by your writing what a shock the last attack of illness has given you, but please God I hope you will rally and get better.

We are faring as usual here. As is natural to expect, the little ones are growing up, and fast becoming men and women. Mark is as tall as I am, and Sally is as tall as her Mama. Both Sarah Ann and myself are pretty stout, and I am glad to say, enjoying good health. Indeed I am very thankful to be able to state that except occasional colds we have no trouble with sickness in the House. This I attribute in a great measure to the careful nursing and judicious (Page 257) treatment of my Sally.

I still keep Mark at school and intend to do so for another year or two, and if he does not take to anything else I shall by and by, if all goes well, employ him in the office with me. Emily and her husband were quite well when we heard from them a few weeks ago, and they are getting along finely. I have ordered a piano to be sent Emily from London which is a wedding present from her Mama. As you know Emily is a tiptop player.

Elizabeth & Lucy and their husbands are quite well, and all Elizabeth’s family are well. Adam Henry is staying with us for the holidays, and our Sallie is at Comox with her Cousin Annie.

Please to give our kind love to all Uncles, Aunts and Cousins and kindly remember us to all friends, and accept dear Mother for yourself and father in law the never failing affection of Sarah Ann and of your

loving Son

M. Bate

(Page 258)

Nanaimo

7 Jan 1875

John Jessop Esq.

Superintendent of Education

Victoria

My Dear Sir

Your two letters (and accompanying papers) duly reached me by this steamer. At the wish of Mr. Gibson & Mr. [Fenney?], I handed all the documents to the latter, who seemed to think it was an usurpation of his position for correspondences to be carried on through me.

We were led to believe Mr. Green was an experienced teacher and that he could obtain a first-class certificate. I quite see the force of your remarks on the appointment of a Teacher for our school, and as we have a meeting tonight, I will suggest that we should name one or the other of the gentlemen who have applied and who hold first class certificates. I have already mentioned the good recommendation you gave respecting Mr. Sweet.

I am, dear Sir

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 259)

 

Nanaimo

7 Jan 1875

Dear Mr. Heisterman

Yours of the 4 inst. With enclosure, duly reached me.

The day of meeting of [?] Lodge will be a suitable time I think for me to visit Victoria if I do not get down before.

Thanking you for your kind attention to the business re: Pemberton Mortgage.

I remain

With best wishes

Yours most truly

M. bate

 

(Page 260)

Nanaimo

13 Jan 1875

John Jessop Esq.

Supt. of Education,

Victoria

Dear Sir

I have your letter of the 11th inst and, like yourself, I am very sorry there should be any difficulty whatever in arranging for school fencing etc. The painter who came up last week told by Mr. Fenny, after seeing Mr. Gibson I believe, that the work could not be done during the present unfavorable state of the weather, and at a meeting held in the evening of the 7th instant, a Resolution was passed to the effect that the painting could best be done during the midsummer vacation; the resolution also contained a protest against the contract being given in Victoria without giving contractors here an opportunity to tender. I mentioned that it was rather late to protest: that if there was any objection to the steps taken to secure offers at Victoria something should have been said earlier. In reply to this, it was stated that the specifications had been altered and the job therefore could have been tendered for at a (Page 261) lower rate here. Mr. Fenny was to forward the Resolution to you. I saw Mr. Fenny today and he said with reference to the money required for incidental expenses that he had sent you a statement showing the expenditure made in excess of the grant.

May I suggest that you come up next week, if you can, to have a conference with the Trustees? When probably a proper understanding may be come to regarding the [Firing?], Furniture, Painting, Teacher etc.

Sincerely hoping with yourself that anything unpleasant to you connected with our school matter may be speedily settled.

I am

Dear Sir

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 262)

Nanaimo

2 Feb. 1875

Messrs Enwright & Beebe

Portland O.

Gentlemen

I beg to enclose a cheque for fifty dollars ($50.00) for which amount please give me credit. The Bills, for one or two of the small consignments you have been good enough to make to me, have not come to hand. I do not know therefore what sums you have against me.

Kindly forward on the return of steamer a statement of my account? and send me at the same time

1 case (fresh) condensed milk and 2 or 3 boxes apples

Obliging thereby

Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 263)

Nanaimo, B.C.

24th Feby 1875

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I have duly signed and sworn to the enclosed [Answer??] for your kind attention to which I am thankful.

In the 10th paragraph it is stated “I did not intend Shakespeare to buy if it went higher” Again in the 13th par it is written that “he bid five times the amount I told him he might bid at”. The same words are repeated in the 14th par

In the original affidavit my words were “the amount he might ‘bid’ or ‘go to’ not to buy. You will know if the word buy is of much importance where used.

I think the reading is not correct at the close of the 14th par. Should it not be multiplying the acres (100) by twenty-five instead of Two hundred & fifty dollars? To multiply the 100 by 250 or vice versa would make the figure Shakespeare bid!

Please give me timely notice to attend when the case comes on for hearing.

I am gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 264)

3rd March 1875

My Dear Mr. Wild

Your kind letter of the 9th and 10th of January I have received, but the one you allude to as written in Dec. has not come to hand. Is it possible it was not enclosed in an official dispatch as you might have intended? I have to thank you most sincerely for the great trouble you are going to in order to obtain a suitable piano for my dear Emily. I got Collards illustrated book of prices which I observed by the address, had been kindly mailed by you, but the quotations seem frightfully high, and I am inclined to favor the purchase of one of foreign manufacture (because cheaper if equally as good for the Cape climate). Mrs. Bate, however, advises me, after looking over all the lists, to leave the selection to you, and to say, merely, that we want to send a good instrument with iron pin plate etc as there may be difficultly about tuning at Beaufort. Next week I will send a draft for 80 pounds to pay costs etc.& if you should purchase at a lower price it will not matter, nor should I be particular about giving 5 pounds more. With your permission I leave the business in your hands feeling sure that you will satisfy (Page 265) us all round. Alport, I am sorry to mention was quite ill when Emily last wrote, She thinks the climate oppresses him. It is probable also he is too much confined to his place of business, going out at Sunrise and returning at sunset.

I am pained to think of the poor return we showed you last half year’s business but seeing our expenditure upon coal getting from month to month you would scarcely anticipate a better result. As I have before mentioned, we have been paying more for the mining proper in some parts of Douglas Pit than we ever did, and considering that so large a proportion of the output is dross we can not make a fair profit and give $1.05 per ton to the miners. The last month (Feby) for instance we have no less than Eighteen [?] coal given in at the figure just stated. Did they produce clean coal it would not be so bad, but the rubbish some of them turn out from the crop workings is really unfit to mix with coal. I like to tell you just what I think of our affairs generally, because my desire is to see, and to make, (if it be possible) the business pay. The Board, please allow me to say, need be under no apprehension of any rupture between my colleagues and myself. Whatever we have to consider or talk of is done with good feeling and never, during the many years we have been associated in the management has angry word passed between us. It is true I speak plain at times, but not in any way to offend I hope. Only this morning I said to my colleague, “We must make a

(Page 266) change in the state of things so as to get a good dividend to the shareholders” He agreed and said, “we will try.” Daily almost do I point out little leaks which might very easily be stopped; the longer such matters are overlooked the greater they become, and are more difficult to get rid of. It seems to me we ought to improve our business in many respects, and now that the mud clearing is nearly all over, the No 5 Level fast going ahead, and fine weather approaching, surely we shall do better!

We have a nip of some sort in the Fitzwilliam slope. Mr. Bryden does not think it is the [?] we are upon, but I hope to hear something additional before writing to the Board this afternoon. Bulkley says he feels sure his wire tramway will be a success. We shall (Page 267) see. He says he saw one working in Wales, and he does not know why the same machinery should not suit here. He has tried in every way to go North of Cameron Island for a terminus. He did not, however, listen to any proposal in that direction. I hope the Board will think we did right in arranging with Bulkley as we did. There is no doubt we could have kept him off the Island, but perhaps it was preferable to yield in some degree to his wishes and with good grace.

Walkem is now here again, and the politicians, opposed to the Government, are after him in considerable force as you might observe by the “Colonist “The officials are pretending to refuse to record land for any body, yet I hear of two or three tracts of thousands of acres within the Reserve belt being claimed by various persons. Expecting and hoping that the Board may secure a “claim” or two by means the party alluded to in Dispatch No 111, I have abstained from recommending that we should at all hazards select a

(Page267) (7) [overwritten] good spot and place some person in possession as Dr. Ash Provincial Secretary did. I am loath moreover to give the officials the intelligence I have about any place because they are all like Ash, they would hardly scruple to take advantage of a [---]. They are rewarded in some way or another I feel pretty certain the members of the Government are not disposed to assist us or them.

[?] lots and new offers called for, but some of the water lots - on Front Street seem to be in demand. We propose to auction off a number of those as soon as the Railway survey is actually begun. Fearing a little pressure of taxation from the Municipal Council we are not raising the prices as we might do. After the Assessment Roll for this year is made out we shall be a little more free to ask a “slight” advance.

(Page 266) [overwritten]

I must tell you a word or two about the Municipal Election by the way. As you know, the Incorporation of the Town was brought about by the Dunsmuir’s factors mainly it is by now seen, to harass the company. They had things pretty much their own way and proposed this, that and the others considered themselves the chosen of the people and made sure of controlling the town. I told Bryden it would seem to [---] the Company’s property to the tender care of his Father-in-Law, Brothers-in-Law and their [--] and we must stop it. Hence, upon the request of our friend. I jumped into the [-] as a candidate for mayor. When the Election was pretty near. You can imagine the nature of the opposition. I assumed money was probably disbursed but all to no purpose. Giving my opponent about 28 bought votes [-] the Wellington mine. I had no [-] them of it. You would have [-] to see how [--] old Dunsmuir was when the result of the poll was announced, though in half an hour afterwards he was cursing and raving like a maniac - insulted Bryden, who had not since spoken to him and the whole family unhappily are not [--] and only one or two on speaking terms. The election cost over $150 (sic) which I could ill afford to expend and I mention this to you thinking probably the Company might help me.

The Cedar District Land [--] about [--] in Victoria and I expect to learn very soon of the Company’s [--] for sale on favourable terms. The owners are not in the Province. Drake and Jackson are the agents of our party and [--] of the men. The coal is [-] Cedar District but deep no doubt in the neighborhood of Boat Harbour and [vicinity?--] is safe for mineral [-----]. What a pity we did not buy the controlling in Baynes Sound.

[The following is unintelligible - It refers to the property in the Baynes Sound area] (Page 267) I am sure you will kindly buy Eighteen shares for me when they are obtainable at a moderate price. Probably after the next [meeting?] of shareholders there will be a decline in [quotations?]. You can well know when to purchase.

I will write again next week. In the meantime

Believe me to remain

Dear Mr. Wild with kindest regards

very truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 268)

13 March 75

My Dear Mr. Wild

I wrote to you last week and now according to promise beg to enclose [writ?] of exchange for Eighty pounds (80) to buy a Piano for my Emily. You have no doubt seen Mr. Whyte of Duke Street, with reference to transmitting the Instrument to the address given in one of my former letters viz:

P. J. Alport & Co
Beaufort West
Cape of Good Hope
Via Mossall Bay CSA.
 

Emily, I dare say, will be looking anxiously for her present, and I hope it will reach her safe and sound. The best news I have to tell you with regard to the works is that we seem to have got over or beyond the fault in Fitzwilliam Slope. When I wrote to the Board two days ago, I was able to state that after going down vertically for some 20 feet the coal was turning towards its natural bed and today a report comes from the Island that “the slope is all right again”. I need hardly say how pleased I am that prospect of our going ahead in the coal at Fitzwilliam slope is yet workable. Of course we shall push on and sink the slope as rapidly as possible.

We are yet under enormous expense at Douglas Pit. The pay spent for February is frightfully heavy, while the output you would see by the monthly statement, was very low.

The town just now is in a great state, (Page 269) of ferment owing to the [-------] of operations of the Island Railway [---?--]. They started at Departure Bay at the point we kept from Bulkley and [-?--] to the other side where the Wellington shipping wharf is situated. They have decided to run a line along the ridge [?] the pit towards Chase River about halfway say between Nicol Street and the Victoria Road. I suppose they will also try other courses to get the best route this side of Nanaimo River. The Company’s land no doubt will be wanted, for the railway to be a considerable extent. I don’t know of under the Dominion Public Works Act land can be obtained for that purpose but I am thinking to suggest to the Board that it may be advisable to endeavor to get other land such as is known to contain coal (for instance) for any that may be required from us. This matter might be looked to perhaps without delay; we should be prepared to select a desirable spot in case exchange can be affected.

With reference to the Indian Reserve and Dr. Powell’s visit here, which I attended to in my official letter of the 11th, I am sorry I did not see the Dr to talk over the matter on the evening of the day he called on me. He, with one or two lady friends who came up from Victoria with him, went to the Government Apts. for the night, and the agent promised the Dr he would let me know where to find him. He failed to keep his promise and being desirous of having half a dozen words with the Indian Agent I went to the steamer early in the morning to meet him. He however had slept on board all night but had not turned out when the steamer cast off. From what the Doctor told me I apprehend there may be some difficulty in getting the mineral under the Indian Reserve. The consent of the Chiefs must be got before any part of the property here be allocated, and the Indian Agent has to bring [?] of them in council a copy of the Pamphlet the Doctor forwarded me. I will forward to the Head Office as soon as I receive it, we might rely, I think, upon Powell’s good offices.

About this time last year we suspended operations at the Newcastle Mine Sites. I am now urging a recommencement of operations there because we can get the coal mined by contract and delivered to the weigher for say, $2.00 per ton, and after Sage gave over working the Newcastle coal was asked for. As is the case apparently with the Fitzwilliam [seam?], the Newcastle may improve towards the interior of the Island.

[--?] of the Bank writes me that he is starting for England next month on a 6 months leave of absence and wants to know of there is anything he can do for me etc., I shall request him to call at Head office. You will perhaps recollect I mentioned he is interested of Baynes Sound- as director of [--?] Company I think.

I have had numerous visits from Victoria and American gentlemen [--?] who are on the lookout for openings to invest money. To one and [--?], I have given lists of [--?] for Lots but I tell them all that we do not reserve property for any purpose over a week or so, and if they wish to purchase, they should decide within that time. Victoria Real Estate [?] want to have (Page 268) an opportunity of selling a few lots for us.

We have fine weather and in a day or two shall begin to search for the Douglas coal a little north of Chase River.

Hoping that you are in enjoyment of good health as I am and with kindest regards

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

Very truly yours

M. Bate

 

(Page 270)

30 Mar 1875

Nanaimo

R. Dickenson Esq.
Mayor of New Westminster

Dear Sir.

I take the liberty of asking if you would be good enough to favor me with a copy of any of your ByLaws that may now be, or have been in force in your Municipality? And would you also kindly inform me in what respect you control and pay your City Police, and how you manage your Police Court business? i.e. Have you as a council sole control and do you exercise it over those matters?

Apologizing for asking so much of you

I am, dear Sir

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 271)

31st Mar 75

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I heartily congratulate you on receiving such a fine addition to your family. The young innocent must certainly be a fine fellow to weigh 12 lb and it will be a source of joy to you that Mrs. Bermingham and the Babe are doing well. We are just writing to Emily and I shall tell her the news. Alport has got pretty well again, but it seems evident the climate does not agree with him. Emily continues to enjoy good health.

Fitzwilliam mine is likely to turn out well yet. In the branch slope we are sinking we seem to be clear of the [---]. The “fault” we met here was merely a sudden dip of the seam for 20 feet. It then assumed its proper dip. The whole field is subject to these (Page 272) sudden dislocations.

I got a note from Bichard the other day in a peculiar sort of an epistle in which he says he hopes we shall be able to get 1000 tons a month at the Island mine. Probably he wishes, as was mentioned in one of Mr. Rosenfeld's letters, to get Berryman to give him a good Charter for the Wellington. The vessels sent to Departure Bay lately have been kept a long time there. One leaves today which arrived about the same time as the 'Arkwright' in Feby!

Austin appears to be getting along nicely.

You observe I suppose that the 'Dominion Pacific Steamship Co' (I think they call it) publishes a prospectus in the local papers. They want to get the Canadian subsidy,

We have just commenced to explore for the Douglas Coal about a mile South of Douglas Pit in the direction we went with Mr. Bell, and I fancy we shall find the seam a few feet from the surface.

The level which was blocked with mud is once more about clear, so I expect we shall begin augment the output before long,

Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and myself and please remember me to Mr. Rosenfeld who I hope is well.

And believe me to remain

very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 273)

31st Mar 1875

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Heisterman

In reply to your favor of the 29th I would state that it is a mistake, or something else, on the part of Mr. Whyte to say the "Nanaimo Coal Co" have made several offers for this land. No direct or indirect application has been made on the part of the Co. and I am sure at this moment that they think so little of it for its coal. if it contains any, that they could not be induced to give 5.00 an acre for it. The land is good, and excepting to Mrs. Bate I have not spoken to any person about it, and as I mentioned to you. I want the ground for myself. I have one section there.

I am getting a plan made of the Town by Mr. [Westgarthe?] which you can have to copy, and then I will give you the [--] and prices of lots you may sell for us.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 274)

6th. April 75

My dear Mr. Wild

It is very good of you to send me such cheering news as your kind notes of the 13th and 27th Feby. contain. You will, however, be rather disappointed that after closing last year with a good months work, the new year began with a change for the worse, but that it will finish well, and with satisfying results there seems no reason to doubt, of course much will depend upon the San Francisco Agency and market. We are prepared right away to augment shipping to Mr. Rosenfeld, and in writing to him on the 30th ultimo I said, I trusted he would shortly see a way clear of entering into more, or renewing old, contracts, and that his demands on us would increase. The coal we are just now turning out looks first-class-clean and bright, and is much harder in the No. 5 Level than on the Pitch side.

I am pleased you approve of the arrangement made with Bulkley re Right of Way etc. He certainly was 'bested' in the matter, and has to pay a much greater sum than he had calculated. He seems very confident as to the success of his wire tramway, the material for which he expects here in August next.

Nicholas (of Nicholas and Francis) who, by the way says they are going to search for coal on their farm, called to tell me the other day that he is positive Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are mining under the Rippon Estate, and, knowing its value I presume, our neighbors are hot after the property and they will give much more than $5,000, if necessary to get it. Were I desiring to buy for myself I would not scruple to value the property at $12,000, but should another auction be ordered I will not overstep the Boards last limit.

Very highly do I appreciate your congratulatory remarks with reference to my election as Mayor. Your opinion of our Councilors, at least of some of them is quite correct. They have advanced notions of Municipal Government, and are growing as fond of Politics as the Canadians of the Eastern Provinces, who have the reputation of being thoroughly posted in the workings of Representative Institutions. In one of my last letters, I believe I mentioned a few facts touching the Elections (Municipal) and from what I now know of the intentions of the promoters of Incorporation it was well one more of the number was not elected. The majority of the Council are our supporters I think, but I expect our taxes will pretty nearly come up to the old Real Estate tax. Whatever the tax may be I shall not be backward in putting a good share of it (in as specious a manner as possible) upon tenants and purchasers of property. The Company can do as they please with the land outside the 'City' boundary? Off another town if thought advisable. It will be competent however, for the Council to enlarge the city as per Clause 46 of the "Municipality Amendment Act" .A copy of which I imagine I forwarded to Head Office. Parliament is to amend and consolidate all the Articles relating to Municipalities and if that is done the new statute shall be sent [-]. If we can keep a hold in the council as at present we shall not come off as badly as

(Page 276) we otherwise would. We can hardly expect lower freights to San Francisco than $4.00 per ton, and I wish Mr. Rosenfeld had been able to contract for the carriage at the same rate of 20000 tons instead of half that quantity. Contracts for large quantities have generally been at a high figure! Rosenfeld, as you will perceive, speaks of the Fitzwilliam coal in his last letter to me as being the best to compete with the Wellington in the San Francisco market. Mr. Bichard sent me a short note, dated 20th Mar referring to our coal, he says: "I received the sample of coal sent per 'Atlanta' (? 1/2 tons Chase River) and find same to be of superior quality to any coal yet found on this coast, I hope that you have a good [?] of it, so as to compete against the Wellington. The cargo [??] Wellington (Fitzwilliam) gave satisfaction as to quality for family use, but for steam it clinkers (Page 277)

more than Wellington. He hopes we will be able to keep both interests running. That is a business, however, he will require to settle with Mr. Rosenfeld.

I shall be circumspect in saying or doing anything about supplying coal to a Victoria Steamship Company, and I shall be sure to confer with Rosenfeld on the subject, whose friends, by running steamers to Victoria four times a month are likely to nip the Colonial scheme in the bud.

My colleague, I fancy, begins to agree with me about opening up mines, but because the Chase River seam does not look quite so well, where we are now working into it, as it did a little while back, we have less men there than formerly. There is no lack of miners to go on with the development of the Newcastle [Sages?] mine or any other, and if we are to go on with exploration in the lower seam, both on Mainland and Island, it is better to proceed quickly and with good force than to be years over the (Page 276) work. I want to see the works heading in the Chase River seam driven onward.

You will have received long ere this reaches home the tracing from the Admiralty charts of locations we might select spots from as containing coal, and while I think of it, I may mention that I am informed there is a surveyor measuring off land to the West of the Union [Claim?] at Comox. He is very quietly at work and until the Indians reported what he was doing, none of the white settlers knew he was in the district. De Cosmos is negotiating for the Union Company Land - 1000 acres, and by some it is contended that by the License of that Company, and the Municipal Ordinance 1869 under which they acquired their claim, they are entitled to another 1500 acres at $10 per acre, I am half inclined to think there is an attempt being made to obtain (Page 277) the 1500 acres by virtue of the License and Act I have alluded to. Perhaps the friends of de Cosmos are instrumental in having the survey [?----].

We have prior engaged copying a map made by A. Hood some years ago. The Copy will be sent Home, and will convey valuable information which is part at all events, the Board is not in possession of. It will show the outcrop of the two seams- Douglas and Newcastle where we have traced it over the whole District, either by finding the coal or the rocks adjacent to it- the areas of coal worked and opened at Douglas pit and the position of Rivers, creeks, swamps & etc. with a very near approach to accuracy.

Hoping you are well and with best wishes, I remain Dear Mr. Wild

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 278)

7 April 1875

John Jessop Esq.
Supt of Education
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

I return herewith duly signed, the voucher for Teachers Salary for March. I have not been able to see Mr. Planta, but presume he will give the requisite receipt, which must be I perceive for 2/3 of the month- amount $66.66.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 279)

12 April 1875

Nanaimo British Columbia

Dear Mother

We received a letter from our dear brother Joseph about two weeks ago, and you can imagine how glad we were to find that you were all well in health, but to learn from the papers we get regularly, as well as from Joseph's letters, that trade is so bad in your country is very distressing. A large number of men, from California and the (Page 280) Eastern States have come around here lately, and just now we have more strangers about than can find work. I read in the paper you kindly sent me the reports of trouble among workmen at different points, and I begin to think that it is about time something was done by the Government to ameliorate the conditions of its miners and artisans. There is no doubt, for a toiling population, like the Midland counties of old England after all, and no place that I know of where less anxiety is felt by the people generally. All are jolly, and if steady and industrious, can make themselves happy. I wrote to you some time ago, and as soon as I got reply letter I sent you some old newspapers by which you can learn of my election to the office of Mayor of this town. William also wrote you I believe, He is doing fairly I think on his farm. I lately bought his property in Nanaimo from him to enable him to buy that farm. Joseph says he would like to come here. At present I am not in a position to pay his passage. All my funds are locked up in property of one kind and another. I shall, however, enclose a $20.00 “greenback” which we trust will relieve a little of the tightness you feel owing to (Page 279) hard times and in my next letter I will forward something more. Greenbacks can be easily obtained here.

And now I must tell you that we are all well. Sarah Ann gets stouter every day and never, thank God has any serious complaint to make about illness. The children continue healthy and strong. Mark still goes to school and he really is a bright chap. He is 15 years old on the 11th of next month. Sally also is a regular attendant at school and would not miss a lesson on any account. She is learning to play the piano and bids fair to become as fine a performer as Emily. It is over [?] months since we heard from Emily [overwritten starts] when she wrote her husband, her baby and herself were well. [L_____y?], Georgie, Lily and May all go to school leaving Baby and Lizzie at home to play by themselves.

Please tell Joseph Sarah Ann was delighted to see his letter, she hopes he will write often and she says you must tell him he must persevere with his violin playing and learn to [beat on the ------?]. I now play a cornet in our local band and I am as fond of music as ever though I have not much time to attend to it. Perhaps one or (Page 280) two of the children will be writing a few lines to go with this. Joseph may expect to hear from me very soon. Asking that our best love may be given to Mary and her husband, to Thomas and his wife and to Joseph and John.

We remain, dear Mother,

Your affectionate son and daughter

M. & S A Bate.

(Page 281)

19 April 75

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am going to ask you to do me a favor - it is to purchase a ‘Mason and Hamelin’ Harmonium for the Masonic Lodge here, of which I am Organist. We want the best Instrument we can get for $85.00 and you will please find enclosed a cheque for that amount. I hope it will not give you much trouble to order the instrument. If the 'Shooting Star' is coming along kindly send by her. There are none of Mason & Hamelin's Harmoniums here, and, being the first the agent will perhaps give me a good one, for the price.

Hoping you are well and that Mrs. Bermingham and Baby are thriving. I am with kind regards of Mrs. Bate and myself. Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 282)

20th April 75

N. I. Jones Esq.
Savannah Georgia
 

My dear Sir

Your letter of the 10th. ultimo is duly to hand.

You no doubt would be somewhat surprised by not getting a remittance according to promise. The reason is: that I heard on board one of our San Francisco vessels that you are on the way to the 'Golden City' and I concluded to wait until I heard from you as I expected I should do soon after your arrival at 'Frisco'.

However, without further delay, I send you Exchange (enclosed) on New York for two hundred and twenty dollars ($220.00). The tenants of both houses are just now several months in arrears with Rent, but I think there is no fear about them paying up sooner or later.

Now with regard to your property and its value allow me to say unfortunately none of the lots away from the business portion of the place- i.e. around Mayers, Hirst, Webbs and thereabout - seem to increase to any extent in value. I have had carpenters to examine the house Fiddick lives in, and they tell me the building is barely worth repairs and that if they once begin to pull any portion of it to pieces it will be as big a job to put it right as build a new house of the same sort. The whole structure was no doubt put up in a very flimsy way. You will find I think that Fiddick's residence was painted outside, with the other houses, but no carpenter work was done at that time.

We have the place incorporated at last and taxation will now be severely felt. I have been elected first Mayor, but as you are aware, as presiding officer, I have no vote in the Municipal Council except in case of a tie. A By-Law has been passed requiring property owners to lay down sidewalks and keep them in order in front of their premises, and I hardly know what besides. I will enclose a copy of the By-Law which is only one of a number the Council contemplates passing. I am getting rid of the Company’s building and property as quickly as possible to avoid the pressure of taxes.

Our old Douglas Pit is going on as steady as ever, but I am sorry to say the demand for coal is not good.

Mrs. Bate and all our family are well and hoping that you and Mrs. Jones are in good health, and asking you to accept the best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain, yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 284)

26 April 1875

Nanaimo

Messrs [Everding ?] & Beebe
Portland, Oregon

 

Gentlemen

Please find enclosed a cheque for 25.37 which I think will balance my a/c to date; but I am not sure if it will.

Kindly send me on the return of the California

2 cases of your best (tin) Peaches for Table use.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

April 29th 1875

Nanaimo

John Jessop Esq.
Supt. of Education
Victoria

 

Dear Sir

I am duly in receipt of your letter of the 26th inst with enclosures. The cheque for teachers salaries etc I have handed to Mr. Fenny and the Voucher for the amount of cheque please find herewith.

The teachers will no doubt attend to the recommendation as to grading the school. At present, you will be pleased to know the school is flourishing

Very truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 285)

5 May 1875

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Walkem

I have to thank you for your favor of the 29th ultimo. Our Municipal Councilors are all pleased with the favorable tenor of your letters which were read last evening. You would readily understand the necessity of the city Policeman being at hand to aid in carrying out the Laws of the Council- hence we thought the Government might be disposed to meet our wishes in that matter.

Your advice on the subject of Road Tax, and the good news you gave us about the Bridge across the Ravine were received with delight and appreciation. We have a big job before us as is the way of fixing Streets and Bridges.

I heard from England of your being there and it was with no small amount of satisfaction that I received the intelligence from home to some of the attention paid to you. Our folks will treat any of your friends who may call on them with your recommendation, right royally. They would be glad to hear your explanation of the Texada business, as far as I was mentioned in connection with it, and I am obliged for your good words.

Hoping you are well and expecting to see you up this way before long.

I am

Most truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 286)

17th May 75

My Dear David

Nearly a month ago, I received your kind letter of the 11th March, and having a few spare moments I will occupy them by writing a line or two in reply. You will prefer, I have no doubt, a short note just now to a lengthy letter in [perspective?] On the 11th of Jan’y, I think on the day after I last wrote to you, I wrote to my dear Mother and enclosed a Bill of Exchange for 5 pounds but through some blunder of the postal authorities here the letter went to the dead letter office at Ottawa, and was fortunately sent back to me. I, however, mailed it a second time and saw it duly registered, and long ere this I hope my dear Mother has safely received it, and its contents. Kindly let my dear Mother know that I shall write to her again shortly and please give her the best love of us all.

The Colliery Manager’s pocket ‘Book’ and ‘Diary’ duly came to hand, and I get regularly the newspapers you are so kind as to mail to me. I hardly know what I should do without them. The information they contain is invaluable to me.

We have not had a letter from Emily or her husband for nearly three months, but we hear often of their welfare from others to whom they have written. I daily look for news directly from them. They are both good correspondents. We have ordered a piano to be sent to Emily from England, so that she may enjoy her music. I think I have before told you that she is an expert player.

I await patiently a letter from T. Hughes. Please tell him so and give my best respects to him. Last week, several Brierley Hill people left here for Home. I gave a note for you to one of the number. Mr. Joseph Webb also will call to see you and tell you about all the [Island of Vancouver etc?] and probably a little information with respect to myself and Sarah Anne.

I am glad to say we are all quite well at this time, and I trust none of your house have any reason to complain with regard to health. Sarah Anne gave Mrs. Webb a sovereign to hand to her Grandmother and we hope the dear old soul will have some benefit from it. Kindly give our best love to your dear Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters and Uncles and Aunts, all of whom we trust are faring well.

Accept the same sentiments for yourself, dear David and believe me to remain

Ever affectionately yours

M. Bate

(Page 288)

22nd June 75

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I owe you many thanks for your goodness in buying the Harmonium for our Masonic Lodge. The instrument is safely at hand, and will, I doubt not, give every satisfaction, and I am sure the members will gladly make up the 8.50 because the Instrument will be superior to anything we expected to get for $93.50. I enclose cheque for $8.50. The lodge will not fail to thank you for carrying the case free of charge for freight.

I heard of you having gone East, but I was sorry to learn you did not succeed in getting a renewal of the mail contract. Rhodes & Co have made a private contract with our neighbours (Page289) to supply the new line with coal. I will send you herewith two papers giving some particulars of the [Layeemoon?] and another steamer which Hudson, Malcolm & Co had for sale some time ago. They sent the papers to me when acknowledging the receipt of the samples of coal, which you will remember were sent to them and they recommended the steamers for ‘Colliers’. I hope you will run a lively opposition to the new line. It is rumoured coal is to be taken on freight every trip.

We got letters from Alport and Emily two weeks ago: they are going on nicely and were quite well when they wrote.

Accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate and of myself and hoping you are well, and Mr. Rosenfeld also.

I am

very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 290)

24th June 75

My Dear Mr. Wild

I am indebted to you for three of your kind and interesting letters, which owing to a rush of work I have been unable to acknowledge before, but I must give attention to them now that the demands upon my time are abating.

The Piano will be pretty near its destination by this, supposing it left London by the 25th of last month. Emily will be delighted to get it, and seeing that Alport was so much in favour of a Collard & Collard, I am rather pleased one of that make has been purchased. Two weeks ago, we heard from Beaufort, and right glad I was to learn that Alport has recovered his health, and to note that he was in good spirits.

Your remarks touching the output and general progress of the miners are [appropriate?], and you can imagine how perplexing it is ,at times, to witness, after a good turnout for a few days a sinking down to the old mark. We, this month, were making a larger extract than we have had for a long time, and I was greatly cheered by the improvement, but all at once there comes a stop to our increase and we fell back as suddenly as we rose. I hardly know what to say of our underground business. It seems to (Page 290 B) me, and I am sorry to say so, to be far from satisfactory in more respects than one. Our neighbours already, I believe, are raising more coal than we are, and there is a drive about their mining operations which we appear to lack. They, for instance, manage to get a good number of their stalls ‘double-banked’ i.e. worked by double shifts, thus keeping the afternoon men fully employed. While our Engine tenders, Runners and Pitheadmen are lolling about nearly half their time. I told Mr. Bryden yesterday, that no establishment in the world, can afford to pay men for doing nothing and that if we have no coal to come out in the afternoon, the staff of hands landing, tipping etc might be reduced. Then, I pointed out, as we were talking quietly, the extraordinary high wages earned by some of the men who are not cutting coal notably Archie Muir in May. He picked up $197.00 for himself and an Indian. It is difficult for the Board to understand, or rather ascertain, the days worked by contractors during a month. The Pay sheet does not show the number of shifts contractors are in the mine hence it is only here that these daily earnings are known. Of course some men will, under any circumstances almost, make more wages than others but 7.00 a shift to the best of miners seems too much to pay and I don’t think such wages are paid at any other mine on the coast. The report of the Directors (Page 291) I perceive mentions the clearance of the No 4 Level of debris in March, whereas the back was only reached at the beginning of this month, and the driving cannot be got on with unfortunately for want of air. Mr. Bryden blames the men who are looking after the bratticing for the defect in ventilation, and I have more than once urged that if the air courses are not kept in order by those employed at the job, others should be put to it and not let the workings along the level stand for the want of a little attention in this direction.

Such an apparently trifling matter is causing a material [exclusion?] of the output. Surely with such an extensive range of stalls etc as we now have in Douglas Pit we ought to put out more coal?

Fitzwilliam mine you will see (Page 292) continues to lead us on by its more promising appearance. There seems to be no doubt that the Branch Slope is leaving the great [----?] behind, and I have been and am watching the sinking with no little concern.

With reference to the discovery near Chase River, it is some years ago that I mentioned to you what I thought of the ground we are now opening up. You probably have forgotten that I advocated then (in 1870 I think) the work we are starting upon, and which, I faintly believe will be not the least successful of any of the company’s mining undertakings. A level driven from the mouth of the Chase River will carry off all the surface water and enable us to take away the coal which, judging by the bore, is good right to the crop.

I was much surprised to learn that (Page 291) Mr. Rosenfeld has tendered his resignation, though I can scarcely make up my mind that he really means to give us up, unless he is desirous of interesting himself in one or more of the new Seattle mines. Two or three weeks ago, there was quite a puff in the Sound papers alluding to some Seattle coal which had been tested by the ‘Los Angeles’ - one of the line of boats owned by the Company of which Rosy is a large shareholder. Until I hear more, however, I shall continue to think that the resignation was handed in for some other purpose than that of relinquishing the Agency. I see, by the way, that Mr. Rosenfeld is getting prominent as a politician!

Drake and Jackson have not sent me a word as to the result of the Rippon Estate case. It is whispered that Judge Gray has decided in my favor, and our neighbours, I fancy, would rather it should be so than otherwise. My opinion of (Page 292) (overwritten) the value of the 100 acres is being strengthened every day almost and without it and another patch or two adjoining them. Dunsmuir, Diggle and Co. would be very much hampered. I am told they are offering $6000. for 40 acres off Chantrell's lands, and Rippon's lot according not only to my judgment but that of nearly everybody who knows anything about it , is worth much more than Chantrells. Some persons or party I expect will be after the [--?] besides D. D. & Co.

As you will perceive by my official letter of this date, Mr. Sproat has called here. I was with him only a short time. He informed me, however, in a few words that he had claimed and asked for certain plots of land which I had indicated on a plan I sent to him and in answer to my questions said: Walkem would co-operate with us: that he was seeing after the Reserves, Newcastle and Indian and that he had applied for a selection out of 500 acres at each of the Bays I mentioned viz: North West and Deep Bay. I fear it is no use trying to deal with York and other proprietors up the Nanaimo River Country. They will only sell on their own terms. I shall talk to Mr. Sproat about them on his return here 3 or 4 days hence.

Don't you consider it about time Bulkley paid for or at least made an installment upon the land granted to him for Right of Way and [--]? I intend to dun him sharply if he does not come forward with some [-] this month. We need money badly just now. While shipments are small we have several extra demands coming upon us- There will be duty on the Diamond Boring Machine, Municipal taxes and the Government Road tax still due (Back to Page 291) [Crosswritten] perhaps within the next two or three weeks.

Hoping you are well and with best wishes

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

very truly yours

M. Bate.

PRIVATE

(Page 293)

30th June 1875

Nanaimo

My Dear Clarke

The 'Discovery' cargo of nut coal is transferred to you as you request. We shall likely have another load for the schr. after the 'Wellington' is loaded, and I will drop you a line when we can supply it. You would notice perhaps that we charged a dollar less than usual price for the former cargo- the next shall be invoiced to you at same rate.

Many thanks for your kind congratulations re Rippon Estates. Rumour says the 'Wellington' people are not only at the face of the Estate, but that they are working into it. I hardly think they would go that far, and therefore do not place any confidence in the rumour. The 100 acres are of great value; there's no doubt about it. I shall in all probability be on hand at the Auction, but, depend on it, without any Shakespeare! Judge Gray does me great injustice with the judgment he rendered, and I have been half inclined to show wherever he does so, but it will perhaps be best to let well alone. I will hear what the lawyers say on the subject. The judge draws false inferences, and attributes language to me that I never used.

Hope yourself and all your Household are well, and with best wishes,

believe me.

Sincerely yours,

M. Bate.

[ Le Star?] going to send the ['Grachel?, Quabel?' Citadel?] up this way. The Maude is doing a rushing business.

 

(Page 294)

30th June 1875

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen.

Your favor of the 28th inst I have before me, and I am pleased to learn by it that the Bill of [-] against myself has been dismissed. I am thankful for your valuable services, and will promptly remit the costs on receipt of an account of same.

The sale is to take place I perceive on the 24th July. I shall doubtless be on hand. I have made several inquiries concerning Rippon. His friends here (two) who came from Australia with him, and who know him there say that "he left Leeds in Yorkshire in 1853 where his relatives resided. A sister living there used to write to him in Australia and California. He went direct from England to Australia; left the later place for California where he arrived in 1858, and the same year received money from his friends in England through the British Consul. They don't know what port he sailed from nor the trade he followed in England. I hope to learn more in a few days.

Yours very truly,

M. Bate

 

(Page 295)

7 July 1875

PRIVATE

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Heisterman

I have your favors of the 28th ultimo and 5th instant. I ought to have replied to the former last week, but was too busy. I expect to be on hand at the Auction of Rippon Estates. Judge Grey attributed to me, as you know, actions I did not perform and worse I never uttered: but I suppose it is no use to pay any attention to his remarks. I am very thankful your testimony was valuable and depend upon it I shall not fail to reciprocate.

If Mr. Nicol applied for Wright & Saunders Land for our Company it must have been at least 6 years ago! It is about that time since he left our Service. If, however, they don't want to sell the land, I don't want to buy. They will doubtless have to hold a long time.

I will see you about Insurance and if I do insure, which is highly probable, you can be certain it will be through you.

Rippon Estates is worth, I feel sure, more money than Shakespeare bid for it. The coal does underlie the land it is certain, and if Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co don't get it, their prospects will look blue. The coal is both thick and good under the Estate (Page 296) and if I had $25,000 I would give it tomorrow for the 100 acres. Our company would rather the place adjoin their own property instead of being detached as it is but its value is none the less to anybody on that account.

I must bring you a list of lots for sale with me. In the meantime, if you can get offers for any water lots on Front Street let me know. We [hold] those lots at from $1,000.00 to 1,200.00 only. Get more if you can.

Please tell Mr. [Pleasence] I shall send him a large plan of the Town for show in a short time. I promised him I would do so, and expect he will be selling some lots at Auction.

Hoping you are well and asking you to excuse this hurried note.

I remain

very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 297)

28th July 1875

Nanaimo

John Jessop Esq.,
Supt. of Education
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

I have duly signed and return herewith the five vouchers you sent me.

Mr. Young has not yet given a receipt for the two months salary. You shall be informed of the attendance at school as you request.

It is necessary that further clearing of bush should be made around the school and I should be glad if you will authorize an expenditure of say $25 for that purpose. There is great danger of bush fires in the vicinity of the school house, and surrounded, as it now is almost with dense bush it would be nearly impossible to save the building in case of fire.

Kindly write me on this subject by the earliest opportunity.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 298)

28 July 1875

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I beg to enclose a cheque for six hundred and ninety six dollars $696.00- the amount of your bill in the case of [---?] against myself.

I am

Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 299)

13 Aug 75

My Dear Clarke

Enclosed I beg to forward documents, relating to the Iron Barge we spoke of, as under:

1. Plan, showing sections

2. Particulars of size, length and weights

3. Directions for putting together

4. Report of James Brooke

After perusing them, or copying them if you please, kindly return to me. Brooke's letter, the directions for putting together, and the Plan? I have no other copy of either, but I think I may trust them in your hands, and would feel sure they are safe. The price we want for (Page 300)

the two Barges is five thousand dollars ($5,000.00)

Is the unscreened coal required for San Francisco, or is wanted for steamers fuel to be delivered here? We ship unscreened at $4.50 a ton, and as you know are always liberal in the matter of weight. If any large quantity is needed for San Francisco, Mr. Rosenfeld will be happy to contract, to do which he has full authority, and as I mentioned to you it is requisite to treat with him respecting coal for California market. Shall I write him on the subject? or is there any way that I can assist you in the [negotiation]? If there is, let me know. I was looking for you on Wednesday evening and would like to have seen you. Perhaps you will be up again shortly. We got letters from Alport and Emily on Tuesday night they speak of vessels going with lumber [?] to Alport and Co. Is that the one you were proposing to send by ? If it is and it is not too late to send by her, we will make up a case to send down next week. It can go as cargo- can be insured, and the Captain’s receipt got for it. Alport can be advised to have this case looked after by their friends at the Port the vessel sails for.

Hoping you are healthy again

Believe me, my dear Clarke,

Most sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 301)

19 Aug 1875

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentlemen

I beg to enclose for your kind attention a copy of a Petition handed to me yesterday by Mr. Fawcett referring again to that unfortunate mistake of Shakespeare in connection with the Rippon Estate. As it is not likely I shall be able to leave here to be in Victoria on the day set down for the hearing, please do what is necessary on my behalf.

Is it not vexatious to further annoy me, and put me to expense that I can ill afford through a mistake purely on the part of another? Do you not think I have suffered enough already?

You will perceive great stress is laid upon the bid of $24500, and upon a sale for that sum being defeated etc. Now I have it from the senior partner and Manager (Mr. Dunsmuir) of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co that they would not have taken the land at anything like the amount Nightingale (who bid for them) offered for it, and he told me moreover that had it been knocked down to Nightingale or Capt. Egerton at the figure named (24,500) the latter gentleman must have [---] the (Page 302) consequences himself. You will perceive therefore that the bidding to 24,000 as far as Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. are concerned, was hardly bona fide. In fact I believe I am right in saying that Nightingale did not know how much he was bidding any more than Shakespeare!

I have, I think, further proof that Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. never intended to bid as high as I instructed Mr. Heisterman to go. In a letter to the Director of the Vancouver Coal Co., (a copy of which I possess) they (D.D.& Co.) state they had intended to go as high as fifteen hundred dollars for the land, and that their Captain Egerton went to Victoria to buy it at that price.

I can only add now, that I am, as you know, wholly innocent of the charge of “defeating the first sale” and I hope you will succeed in putting a stop to any further proceedings in the matter.

If you could have the hearing postponed till, say, Monday the 30th instant I believe I could attend.

I am Gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 303)

19 August 1875

Nanaimo

My Dear Mr. Heisterman

Your notes of the 9th and 14th inst. duly reached me, but as I had neither the Receipt of Mr. Fawcett nor the money from Nightingale, I did not write to you last week. Had I known the matter was so urgent I should certainly have written you. The business you asked me to perform I would do with the greatest of pleasure. Nightingale has not kept his promise about paying the $231.39 and, if I do not collect it either tonight or in the morning, I will return his Policy herewith and get Nightingale to send you a cheque for the above amount (and the receipt for $87.45) and you can then send him the Policy. Fawcett's Policy I have delivered to him and his receipt please find enclosed.

My own policy I have not had time to give attention to, but you may expect soon to get the application.

I don't think the Rippon (Page 304) Estate worth as much to anybody as to Dunsmuir & Co. and they paid quite enough for it. [Bunsten?] I understand was bidding for an outside party- Admiral Cochrane it is said. He certainly was not bidding for me. I had no connection with him whatsoever.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 305)

2nd. Sept 75

Dear Mr. Heisterman

I now enclose application for Life Insurance Policy for Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) which is all my wife will agree for me to go to. I want the policy to be made out in a manner that will admit to my willing it to whomsoever I please or of my transferring it to my wife or children I presume all that is allowable.

I want you also to kindly furnish me with a copy of the Application as filled up. Mrs. Bate wont be satisfied without it.

I shall see you at Victoria very soon, in the meantime, believe me

Yours sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 306)

6th Oct 1875

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson
Victoria
 

Gentleman

I beg to return, duly signed, the application for Registration under the Homestead Ordinance of Lots 19 & 20 Block XI in this Town. I value said Lots with buildings at $2500- and upwards.

Yours very truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

(Page 307)

12 Oct 1875

Nanaimo

Nicholas I Jones Esq.
Savannah Georgia
 

My Dear Sir

Your letter of the 5th August last duly reached me, and I see by it that you did not leave for San Francisco as I was told. If I remember rightly it was Moses Bevilockway, who informed his brother-in law Capt. Austin of the 'Shooting Star', that you were “on the way”.

With reference to sidewalks, it is not very likely we shall reach the Esplanade this year. Improvements to streets generally are being made in what is termed the business part of the Town- that is about Hirst’s, Mayer’s, Cunningham's old place etc. I have tried my best to get your price for your property, but the highest offer I have been able to get is $1500- If I could get, say 1750.00, I would strongly advise you to take it, because whoever gives that price will require to spend a considerable sum to place the house on the Esplanade in order. The fencing is tumbling down- requires new posts all round. The tenant tells me he has patched so much that it is no use trying to keep the fence up any longer. The first breeze he believes will topple it over. As to Fiddick's House, fencing etc. the whole is in a very shaky condition, and I am reluctant to expend on such a shanty, the whole of your money which I (Page308) receive for Rents. That would not pay you. I am sure you could do better by getting [1700?] putting it in the Savings Bank at interest, than by getting the Rent you do and having to pay out of it in Taxes, Insurance, Repairs etc. If you so instruct me I will advertise the property for sale and name as the price $1750.00.

Our city council does not work very smoothly. The old sectional jealousies are as rife as ever - one part of Town and people against the other, and every body disappointed on account of the do nothing policy of the Canadian Government. They are treating the Country shamefully. You will perhaps bear in mind that a Railway was to be built over the Mountains, and the agreement was to start with the work in two years. Four years have now gone and there is no beginning yet.

I am sorry to hear you have been poorly and I hope you will be fully restored to health long before this reaches you.

Myself and family are all well, and beg you will accept for Mrs. Jones and yourself our united regards, and believe me to remain

most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 309)

12 Oct 1875

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

I duly received the Life Policy for Five thousand dollars ($5,000) of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York and I beg to enclose a cheque for the amount of premium for one year viz $151.95.

If you can send me or obtain for us further policy for $2500.00 at the same rate as the No 1 hold I will send a cheque at once.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

20 Oct 1876

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq
Victoria
 

Dear Sir

I have your favor of the 16th inst and now beg to enclose a cheque for $70.00 which, with 5.00 I will hand to Dr. Cluness, will pay for a further Life Policy for $2500 in my favor from the Mutual Life Insurance Co. New York.

Very truly Yours

M. Bate

(Page 310)

20 Oct 1875

Nanaimo

Thos. [Will Stahloschmidt?] Esq.
Victoria
 

My Dear Sir

I have yours of the 18th inst by which I am glad to hear that the 'City of Panama' sustained very little damage.

Business here is so pressing just now that I can not leave without serious inconvenience. If, however, an opportunity should offer, to allow me to get off Saturday night or Sunday, so as to be in Victoria on Monday, I will endeavour to avail myself of it.

I will give Mr. Hirst a duplicate of the cheque at any time. I have told him so.

With reference to Powder send as a Bill please of the 10 kegs at the lower price you can put it at. I think I mentioned to you the California Powder, which is much liked by our miners, costs us about 13 1/2 cents per lb. delivered here. The men say all the English Powder makes more smoke than the California.

Very truly yours

M. bate

(Page 311)

20 Oct 1875

Nanaimo

Dear Mr. Sproat

I have to thank you for yours of the 18th inst, and for your promised attention to the personal business I wrote about.

The men who were boring on the south side of Nanaimo Harbour are now here. I have not yet heard anything of their prospects, but have been told they were using Mr. Bulkley's rods.

I wish I had heard from you before respecting the Rail ships expected to come here. An arrangement has been made, I believe with Mr. H. Cooper, for receiving the Rails and storing them and I have promised to give every facility we can for landing consistent with a proper prosecution of our own works, i.e. shipping coal. We find ground for Storage in a spot selected by Marcus Smith some two months ago. It was Smith who came to see us about discharging the ships, but he said nothing about Coal Freights. Would there be any object in your stating that you have had correspondence with me regarding the Rail ships- their accommodation etc? We are now paying 3.00 to 4.00 freight to San Francisco. Before saying anything about a charter for the Rail ships, it will be necessary for me to write to Mr. Rosenfeld to ascertain, what engagements he has made and whether he will be able to take the coal. I will attend to this matter at once. In the meantime should a vessel arrive we will make use of the telegraph. We can give good dispatch in loading.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 312)

21st Feby 76

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I intended when last writing to you to drop you a private note but I was too busy. I wanted to say that the letter of Capt. Marshall to Messrs Pope and Talbot was entirely a misrepresentation. I am afraid the Captain was too much around the hotels to know what was going on about the ship or anything else. Had he been wanting for coal, it is reasonable to suppose he would have said something at the office. He made no remark on the subject, but our own men observed, more than once, that the ' Arkwright' did not appear in any hurry to leave! And what led me to address to the question of vessels receiving coal slowly was the

Arkwright” keeping our locomotive etc. standing, because she did not take coal at all lively. I hope she will be better next trip.

Allow me to thank you for your kind sympathy upon the loss of my poor boy. He was a fine little fellow nearly 11 years old and his death has been a sad blow to me and Mrs. Bate. I have not been well since he died.

Hoping that you are in good health and with kind regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

I am, very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 313)

23rd. Feby 76

N.L. Jones Esq.
Savannah Georgia
 

My Dear Sir.

I duly received your letter of the 18th. ultimo, and I now am able to inform you that I have agreed to sell your property to Capt. Spalding for Eighteen hundred dollars $1800.00 Cash. I consider it a good sale in your interest, for really the buildings are in very bad condition. The money will be paid to me as soon as I can give a conveyance, and to enable me to make out and execute the necessary papers for you. I require your Power of Attorney, which, of course, must be made in legal form and acknowledged before a proper person- Notary Public and the British Consul. I will promptly send the money to you with the Rents to the end of the month. If you would allow me a commission on the transaction please say at what rate?

You will soon be in receipt of the purchase money etc. by forwarding me Power of Attorney without loss of time.

We have been unusually busy lately shipping Coal. Last year our sales were low, and we accumulated a large stock. We have now about 1200 tons on hand. I am elected Mayor for a second term by acclamation, but the office is not a very light one. The magisterial duties take up a good deal of my time.

With best wishes, and hoping that yourself and Mrs. Jones are well.

I am, very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 314)

4 March 76

My Dear Clarke

I was sorry to learn by yours of the 24th ultimo that you were confined to the house. I had heard of your getting hurt, by being upset from a buggy, I hope you are all right again ere now.

I regret to hear of your financial tightness, for my sake as well as your own, because I am embarrassed for being accommodating to others. As you know, I took the one thousand dollars ($1000.00) I loaned you out of the Bank,

for that purpose, and according to promise it should have been paid back in April last year. As you further know, the progressive wants of my family are such that it is my imperative duty to provide for them. Please therefore, if it is possible for you to send me the money, to forward a new note with any security you can give. The note you did send me is of little use. Peck was kind enough to lend me $700 to pay a claim I had to make or I should have been in a fix. I never before in my life had to ask for assistance from a friend, and it gave me no little uneasiness to have to do so.

I do not like to owe Peck money nor anybody else, and the house expenses and other charges that fall on me, absorb all my income hence I depend on a refund from you to pay my indebtedness. Were I not fettered I should not be so urgent. What I should like is a note & etc. I could negotiate to relieve myself. You know my dear Clarke, I should not be so pressing if there was not necessity for it, and I trust sincerely you will succeed (Page 314)

in getting the money for me very soon.

What are you going to do in San Francisco? Surely you will not leave Victoria without being sure that you will better yourself.

I should like to get back the Plan and other papers I sent to you referring to the C S Iron Barges. Kindly forward them to me.

No news has reached me from Alport for 4 months or more. Have you heard anything from him lately?

With best wishes and hoping yourself and family are well.

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 316)

22nd. March 1876

If Mr. Francis can spare the Horse ‘Dick’ which the writer was looking at for one week and will send him to Nanaimo by the ‘Maude’ to be tried with an Animal about his size I will pay the expense of conveyance and be responsible for ‘Dick’ after he is put on board the steamer. If the horse suits, I will pay for him the price Mr. Francis named.

M. Bate

31st March 76

Mr. Benjamin Roper
Nanaimo
 

Dear Sir

I beg to inform you that your note for $150.00 became due on the 20th instant, and I have to request that you will be good enough to call and pay the amount due with interest.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 317)

12th April 76

My Dear Sir

I am glad to learn by your letter of the 10th that you expect every opportunity to well with the new agency. As regard our coal melting on the fire bars, the old Douglas I know does coalesce and form one mass in furnace, because of its excess of bitumen, but it only wants stoking properly to make a good steam fuel. However we could undertake to furnish the new mine coal which is liked quite as well as the Wellington for any purpose. In order that the 'Dakota' may try it we will deliver a cargo for the 'Black Diamond' to be used by the 'Dakota' at $ 5.00 per ton and, if the coal is found satisfactory and you can induce the steamer to take it regularly, we will allow you a discount to be named hereafter.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

J. Engelhardt, Esq.
Victoria

(Page 318)

5 Oct. 1875

Nicholas, John Jones Esq.
Savannah, Georgia
 

My Dear Sir.

I ought to have sent you the enclosed Bills some time ago, but in the hope of getting payment of the Rents, owing I deferred making a remittance. I wished to wind up your business all at once but have not been able to do so.

The Exchange for $1800.20 herewith cost $1824.45. Just as soon as I can obtain payment of the Rents owing I will send the balance of your [Acc.?] to you.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 319)

6 Oct 76

My Dear Clarke

Since receiving your letter of the 2nd inst I have met with Rudlin of the 'Beaver' who gave me very much the same information with regard to Raymen and Rhodes entering the coal business, as you did, but he does not know particulars. Now with regard to the 'Bonanza', would she carry coal for you on the same terms as for Raymond etc? If she or any other vessel will carry at the same rate for you as for other parties I will see that you get coal for $4.50 per ton as soon as the winter campaign begins, i.e. when Raymond and Rhodes start to

(Page 20) sell. The Harewood coal is dirty stuff - about half dross, but if you think you cannot compete by getting coal at $4.50, do not involve yourself for Schr., wharf, or anything else. Won’t Moore carry coal for you too at the same rate as Rhodes? If you can charter the ‘Bonanza’ right away I will load her either with Chase River, or Fitzwilliam coal right away at $4.50. It occurs to me if you can make a load before the others commence you will have an advantage of them, and it may help you to secure customers.

I am looking for the 'St. Paul' hourly, and am very busy getting ready for her. I don’t think she will call at Victoria.

Mrs. Bate is improving, though slowly. She is very weak and I expect when the time comes will hardly be willing for me to leave her a week or two.

With kindest regards,

Most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 321)

15 Nov 1876

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

I have your note of the 13th inst. with enclosures. I prefer to send you enclosed the full amount of premium on my policy No 172084, viz 75.45 and allow the Dividend $43.15 to be added to the Policy.

Very truly yours

M. Bate

P.S. I am sorry to say Mrs. Bate is still seriously ill though she is not quite so weak as she was I feel much concerned about her.

B.

(Page 322)

29 Nov 76

My dear Mr. Rosenfeld

May I ask you to do me a favor ordering a fence for my poor boys grave, as per plan herewith? The iron work only is wanted. Stone coping etc. I have provided here. The makers will see the size I require by the Plan, and the style of the fence is no. 6 on the enclosed description sheet. The position of the gate is shown and all particulars, I think, that are needed. The fence and gate I wish complete, nicely bronzed, and ready to put together on arrival here. For the cost, I will promptly remit cheque or receipt of the Bill.

Mrs. Bate, I am sorry to state, is still very unwell. Kindly remember us to Mr. Bermingham, and with kindest regards,

I am

most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 323)

8th March 76

PRIVATE

John Rosenfeld Esq.
San Francisco
 

My dear Sir

I beg to thank you for your private letter the 25th ult, and for the copy of your letter to Mrs. Dunsmuir. A copy of his letter to you, however, was not enclosed as you intended. I am very cautious not to assist Messr’s Dunsmuir, Diggle etc in any way that would be detrimental to our own interests. My only desire is to see coal mined cheap. The cheaper they get men to work the better it will be for us, but they have to fight the battle and a costly one it will be. We will not involve ourselves in their assessment nor run any risk particularly after Mr. Berryman’s contact, of which I am glad to be informed. I should infer that Berryman is selling as Agent for Dunsmuir, Diggle etc. and not for himself! Do you not think so?

If all is well I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you in May next, Mrs. Bate is gathering strength fast and by that time will be able to accompany me to your city.

Please remember us both to Mr. Bermingham, and accept our united regards for yourself.

Most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 324)

28th Mar 77

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am much obliged to you for your private note of the 19th instant.

In my official letter herewith I have advised you of the 'City of Panama' going to the Harewood wharf for coal. Capt. Seabury informs me it is Berryman who had made the arrangement. He gave me a look privately, at his letter of instructions by which I perceived Berryman could order the steamer where he liked, and on leaving the office Seabury said he “hoped I was not mad with him.” Of course, I appeared perfectly indifferent about the matter and replied that I supposed they were at liberty to load where they pleased but we should at any time be pleased to accommodate him and his steamer. They are having a troublesome job with the loading and I believe the Harewood coal will be found of inferior quality. However that they must find out. In any case I don’ t think the Capt. will care to go for Harewood coal again.

It is very good of you offering Mrs. Bate and myself a Home with you on our visit to your city, and Mrs. Bate asks me to thank you and Mrs. Rosenfeld for your kindness. We hope to be able to be leave this at the end of next month, or early in May and I will telegraph to you from Victoria.

We have all the office help we need at present. B.C. is not a good place for a bookkeeper or clerk to seek a situation and I could not recommend Mr. Lovelock to come this way with that object only. If he visits the country, I should be very glad to see him at Nanaimo.

With very best wishes

Yours most truly

M. Bate

( Page 325)

21st Aug 77

Dear Mr. Neil

I beg to thank you most heartily for your very welcome letters of the 23rd, June and 21 July, and for your kind attention to Alport’s box on its arrival in London. I feel quite sure the contents will be sent forward safely in due course. We have not heard from Beaufort for about eight months.

To tell you how deeply I feel, and how much I appreciate your kindly mention of Mrs. Bate is a task I dare not undertake, nor can I find the language to make known to you how thankful I am that she is getting along so well. Although her general health is not as good as it was before her terrible illness, she is very nearly as stout as she was two years ago, and seems to be taking great care to be gradually gaining strength. She goes about her usual house duties but is rather easily fatigued.

As I mentioned to the Board in my official letter, I did not forget to look up the Oregon Steamship Co. when in San Francisco. I called at their office twice, was about the wharf seeing the steamer coal, and observed that the bulk of their fuel, supplied at San Francisco, was Sydney coal and Mount Diablo. I write occasionally to the agent at Portland, and always when visiting Victoria, have a chat with the agent there. Dunsmuir Diggle and Bulkley, I was informed, lured them with offers of coal, nevertheless the ‘California’ is (Page 326) taking about 200 tons monthly from us for San Francisco steamers coaling at Portland. If I can see my way clear to make a trip to Portland at the end of next month, or beginning of October I shall probably go. The gas company there, I hear, consumes 400 tons a month.

With regard to the Directors Diary, you are quite correct in stating that Mr. Bryden can have access to it anytime he pleases. It is kept in the office, and in it every evening, as a rule, I set down whatever to my knowledge occurred during the day, or what has been going on that I think should be recorded for the information and interest of the Board. Of course I have spoken to Mr. Bryden on the coal-mixing question and that, as well as other matters, are discussed in the proper spirit. We are generally in unison when deciding questions in the office, but after admitting that a certain thing should be done, or certain course be taken, probably the very opposite is followed. But I, for reasons which I think you understand, there are times when I do not deem it prudent to speak to Mr. Bryden with that confidence I ought to be quite safe in doing. His well-known sympathy with a rival company often, as it seems to me, gets the better of him, and leads him to look at our affairs from our neighbour’s standpoint.

I was much surprised to learn that the men’s diary has not been kept up, and regularly forwarded Home. The book was in the office for a month or two after you left. Over a year ago it was taken away to a little room nicely fixed on Douglas (Page 327) pit to be there written up daily by Mr. Bryden and Mr. Prior and I have supposed that the Board were every month receiving notes from their hands of current mining progress. This carelessness (I do not know what else to term it) is shown in other things which have been commenced and stand unfinished. Prior leaves us at the end of the month, and for the present young McGregor, who has had charge of the [Receivers-?] for some time as to overlook, the Douglas pit workings and workmen. Prior has told me by the way that Mr. Bryden does not go through the old mine oftener than once in six weeks! The engagement of proper [receivers -?] and surveyor at Home is favoured by Bryden as well as myself but I believe he wishes to hear what the Board say before touching the matter from here. I tell him the Board will naturally look for an application, and for information from us. In any case, I am firmly convinced we want a good go-ahead Englishman about the works. I can hardly rest and see other people overtake us as they are doing. The Wellington mine has turned out over 400 tons a day!

We have glorious weather for getting on with Engine work. I fear, however, the end of next month will not see the new and large machinery started at Chase River,

Mrs. Bate asks to be kindly remembered to you, as do Mark and Sally. The former has grown up a fine strapping fellow and he is much admired for his gentlemanly behaviour. Rosey does not write encouragingly of the market, but he seems to beat [Bermingham?] altogether in selling.

With very best wishes, and hoping you are well.

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

very truly yours

M Bate.

(Page 328)

12 Sept 1877

Nanaimo

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Agent Mutual Life Insurance Co.

Victoria

Dear Sir.

Please find enclosed a cheque for $150.95 premium on my policy 169883.

I prefer to pay the whole premium and allow the addition to go to the Policy.

Very truly yours

M. Bate.

16 Nov 77

H. F. Heisterman Esq.
Victoria
 

Dear Sir.

I beg to forward herewith a cheque for $ 75.48 being premium

on my policy 172084. I note there is $45.00 to be added.

You are right about the coal market. Prices were never as low before at San Francisco as they are now. Such a ruinous statement is more than any of our Island mines can stand under for any length of time. I fail to discern the slightest prospect of an improvement

Yours very truly,

M. Bate.

(Page 329)

7 Jan 78

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Many thanks for your private letter of the 28th ultimo.

It was a very wise course in my opinion to charter the 'Cassandra Adams' and 'Two Brothers' through Messrs Williams, Blanchard & Co. I am certain you could readily see the advantage of it, as no doubt their friendship, a cooperation to a great extent is obtained. If you can continue to influence the agents by the same means, I know you will not fail to do so.

I am glad the Capt. and Engineer are rather more favourably disposed towards us, and although they could hardly run counter to the wish of the Agents, it is well to secure their good will.

It is understood that young Dunsmuir (a silly sort of fellow) is to join Berryman in partnership and that the firm name will be “Berryman & Dunsmuir”

They are to open coal yards in various localities – at Oakland right away.

Whether the assistance Diggle and young Dunsmuir will afford Berryman will be of any value or not ,you will be able to judge. I agree with you they must be kept out of harms way, and to prevent (Page 330) their rashness from materially injuring us as you will know how to push them and in what direction and to what length our opposition should run. Please don’t let them get any of the Pacific Mail SS Co., business if you can prevent it.

Rely upon my reticence, I shall avoid, as I always do, talking business to Dunsmuir at all.

With very best wishes and kindest regards.

Believe me

very truly yours

(Page 330) [blurred]

5th July 78

My Dear Mr. Rithet

I perceive the Naval authorities are calling for tenders for the supply of H. M. ships and the Navy yard with coal. Could you make any offer for the business? Or if you cannot, who do you think I could cooperate with in bidding.

Who owns the 'Bonanza'?

Kindly reply by an early opportunity and greatly oblige, yours faithfully

M. Bate.

(Page 331)

27th July 78

My Dear Mr. Wild

Your two kind letters of the 11th and 22nd ultimo I was much pleased to receive. I have had by me for some time two other letters of yours written in Sept and Oct. of last year, to which I ought to have replied long ago. If you will please allow me while I think of it, I will try to explain in a few words the seeming inconsistency of some of my observations referring to men leaving Nanaimo last year to go to Wellington, where they might earn good pay with me, that is, if kept employed. But a man’s position, for instance, may be made so uncomfortable as to almost force him to leave. He might be kept waiting for a stall until he is satisfied that there is no chance of his getting one! I was never able to learn that any contractors working for Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co earned as high rates of daily pay as our slope men, to whom you will remember I alluded. Whatever effect my writing of the matter of wages might have produced in the minds of the Board, I am pretty sure you will be pleased to know that me constant allusion here to the meaning of curtailing contract prices for yardage, lumbering (sic) and other work is, by slow degrees, bringing about the desired end. Mr. Bryden is now keeping a mine diary, and when speaking of it, or asking him if he has made a note of any particular occurrence, I often remark that it will never do to allow the book to be thrown aside again. He has (Page 333) [Blurred]

There is no improvement in our coal market which is most inactive. Australian coal to arrive has been sold as low as $5.00. Mr. Nichols of Nichols & Francis has shown me a letter from Mr. R Chandler giving a very discouraging account of the immediate future of the coke market. Mr. Chandler does not appear to wish to stimulate N & F to push on their operations and get out coal. In fact, he plainly states that there is more coal in San Francisco and on the [--] than can be got rid of at anything like a fair price this year. Chandler is a large coal and iron dealer and it is he who is advancing money to open the South Wellington mine. He surely expects to get the amount of his loan back out of coal somehow? When I left San Francisco I was under the impression that Mr. Rosenfeld would do something to get coal retailed from a yard. No doubt the Board would talk to him on the subject. We looked around several times, but a suitable place for a [-] [----] $2.00 a ton. I have two or three letters from Victoria about them, but all I can do is refer to the agency below. In this connection you would learn I dare say that Williams Blanchard & Co. charter the vessels that are carrying coal for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co., all of which are employed, Mr. Rosenfeld states, as the same freight as he would pay, and he thinks we gain a point by allowing Messrs. N. & B. to pick up the charter’s commission.

I am very sorry to state that Mrs. Bate has not enjoyed good health since her painful illness nearly two years ago. She is now confined to her room and I am writing this by her bedside. Had she been able to be about, I should have gone to Victoria to see what could be done towards securing the supply of coal for the Navy. As I could not leave, I have sent Mr. Hunter well armed with ammunition. Engelhardt & Co., the present contractors, for [-] He was well disposed towards us and in private letters speaks about better future business relations etc. (Page 334 left) [illegible, dark blurring, overwritten by Mr. Bates final remarks and his signature.]

(Page 334) [Blurred]

retail trade was not then available. Mr. Rosenfeld said however that he would try to place a young man in the business who he thought (under his supervision) would manage it well. It may not be worth while to trouble about a yard just at this time for Berryman & Co. and the Seattle people are battling with one another so sharply that both, I fancy, must be lacking money. Chandler states [--] per ton was the retail price for Wellington coal. [------------------]. How it is sold at $8.00 and Seattle [-----]! Certainly there can be no profit in these matters. Referring to Charters, I don’t think Mr. Rosenfeld makes any commission out of the ships that come to us, but I believe the [-] he engage come in first. Almost every day when I was in his office, a Broker would come along to offer a vessel. We have opportunities recently of getting ships at Victoria as from 25 [-----] less per ton than we pay to San Francisco firms and I wish we could take up an outsider occasionally. The S.S. Lillefeld and Belle Morse', each about 2000 tons, [--] now lying in Royal Roads can be engaged for.

(Page 335)

September 30th 78

My Dear Mr. Wild

When last I wrote to you, Mrs. Bate was very ill in bed. She is now, I am proud to say, up and around again, though weak and very much reduced. My trouble, it seemed, was not to end with Mrs. Bates partial recovery, for as soon as she was able to sit up, one of the girls was taken sick with [--?], and in about a week afterwards another was also down with the same disease. Understanding the cases I managed, with slight aid from the Doctor, and by almost constant attention to get them all right, and they are now nearly quite well, but I confine them to a room to avoid liability of taking cold. By the way, our old medical officer, Dr Jones, being encouraged by some of our citizens, is about to take up his residence among us, and I should not wonder if he is engaged after a while by Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co.

There were one or two subjects that I wished to touch upon, when I last addressed you which I will now refer to. At the last Parliamentary Election here, I was strongly pressed to become a candidate, but I felt it my duty, to decline. I was induced, however, to give a tacit support to Mr. G. A. Walkem’s nomination – i.e. to a gentleman who he could depend on in the House, and in consideration of that support Mr. Walkem promised me he would, if it lay in his power, abolish the dual system of taxation in Municipalities, a system inaugurated by the late Elliott government. The Premier has gone so far towards carrying out his promise as to announce in Parliament that there be a repeal next session of the

(Page 336) Assessment Act by force of which the Dual tax is collected. If he succeeds with the repeal, it will save the Company about [$4,000.00?] a year. Under the circumstance I think I was right in helping Walkem. Our neighbours in the District get off with much lighter taxation than we do by reason of the Municipal taxes.

At the next general election or maybe before, Nanaimo is to be allowed two members. I fully expect I should be requested to represent the city-portion of the district, or at least to become a Candidate for the honor. Of course, I could not consent without the Boards sanction. May I take the liberty to ask to you kindly inform me if it is probable I might be permitted to attend to the duties which would devolve upon me in the event of my Election? My great aim in entering Parliament would be to benefit the Company if I saw an opportunity, as well as to attend to the interests of the District.

Another matter I wanted to speak of is: the “Sproat business”. If I remember rightly it was by Mr. Walkem’s influence and assistance that Mr. Sproat appeared to secure certain sections of land for the Company. Beyond recommending as I believe he did, as Indian Reserve Commissioner, that the Indians be allowed to exchange the minerals under the Reserve south of us for some land of the Company’s on the mouth of Nanaimo River, I as not aware that he ever did anything. Would it be considered proper for me to enquire of Mr. Walkem if Mr. Sproat made an application on behalf of the Company? It is very likely that the Railway Reserve will be lifted next Session of the Legislature, Squatter’s are thickly stationed upon the ground south of the Nanaimo River, portions of which without doubt contain valuable coal. York & Gordon have explored a spot/referred to in Directors journal for the month and have discovered the Chase River Seam. The Douglas is within easy reach, but York and his party do not intend to touch it until it is ascertained if they can hold the land.

In the hope of obtaining sections 16 & 17 Range VI Mountain District, I have put a man in possession at $30 per month. I recorded those sections in my name on the 19th May 1870 and Bryden recorded in his name Section 18. His brother-in-law James Dunsmuir has taken (Page 337) possession of it and Bryden does nothing to show his ownership. Young Dunsmuir wants to jump to the other two sections also, but I think I can hold against him. I have paid arrears of taxes, got receipts, and have written to the Chief Commissioner of Lands & Works respecting a title. There is that claim Bryden preempted at Departure Bay, on which we used to quarry Limestone, just in the fix it was when you left here. I expect Dunsmuir will get that yet.

With no Diamond Boring going on, Mr. McKay is next to a nuisance. Since the last Bore was stopped, nearly a month and a half ago, he has been [lounging?] I hardly know what we can do with him. Beck does not think there is much difficulty in managing the Boring Machine, setting [--] and a clever fellow like him ought to know I scarcely believe there is any part of the work he could not direct or carry out. We have one or two experienced (Page 337) hands who have run the machine very nearly all the time it had been in operation.

Gillespie is kept on against my wishes as an assistant, or overseer in addition to [B----? and McGregor?] thought Gillespie was about to take the latter person’s place but they are still “kept on” so that we have not had [?] with Prior.

You will be very sorry to lean that Alport writes to me saying that the condition of his affairs at Beaufort is most unsatisfactory. He states his four year agreement has expired and for some time past [---] . He speaks of as being [-----------------------] his position and he adds that he should [-] bettering his (Alport’s) position----------------] present salary he represents, he is only just able to come out and he seems [----] there is no prospect of any preferment being given [---]. His uncle promised after 4 years service his future would be determined and all that Alport can learn [the remainder is cross writing, faint and illegible]

(Page 338)

26 Feby 79

My Dear Mr. Wild

I was not at all disappointed to learn from your kind letter of 23rd Nov, 3rd of Dec & 23 ultimo that the opinion expressed by the Board was adverse to my accepting nomination for a seat in the Provincial Legislature. I have no particular desire to become a candidate for Parliamentary honours, nor do I wish to be pestered by politicians - hence I promised to ascertain from the Directors if I may be permitted to stand at the proper time in the event of a written request being presented to me. An Act passed last September providing for a redistribution of Seats in the District of Nanaimo, Cowichan, & Kootenay has a clause reading thus: “When a vacancy shall occur in the representation of the District of Cowichan by the death or a resignation of one or of both of its members, the said District shall therefore be represented in the Legislative Assembly by one Member only, and the District of Nanaimo shall then be entitled to be represented in the said Assembly by two members, that is to say, by one member in addition to the sitting members and such other member shall be chosen according and subject to the laws relating to members of the said assembly”. You will perceive that it may be two years yet, unless Parliament is dissolved, or a vacancy occurs in Cowichan, before Nanaimo will be entitled to an additional member. The present member for Nanaimo (Page 339)

is a staunch friend of mine, a friend of the town, and a friend of the Company, and he will at all times do anything he can for our united interests.

Mr. Planta, I am pleased to say is steady, and I have always found him reliable. He is hardly [?] equal for work - not quite so industrious. He is an odd sort of a person, rather, and by some folk (Bryden among them) is considered to be an eccentric character. Nevertheless, he has good points - will do anything I want him, or go anywhere I want him, day or night. Mark is very useful, and in the course of a month or so I propose to get along with less clerk hire than we now have.

There is no doubt the Board have managed exceedingly well to carry through the past year and a half without making a call upon the shareholders.

With the very serious drop we have had in prices, it could scarcely be expected that dividends would be forthcoming. It will be remembered that at one time we received at the wharves here as much for coal as we now obtain in San Francisco. Our Wellington opponents sell at the wharf to the local trade at $4.00 per ton, and I suppose, when we clear away the Fitzwilliam heap we shall have to follow them. Our charge at present is 4.50 per ton for Douglas Coal, By the way, what would you think of allowing the Fitzwilliam mine to be worked by contract i.e. let a company of miners- good men, deliver the coal at the slope head for a stated price to be fixed on receipt of public tender for the work? We can always get rid of a small quantity of Fitzwilliam coal in the Victoria market and Mr. Rosenfeld may find sale for rather more than he has done hitherto. I can not (Page 340) understand why the coal, particularly the bottom part

of the seam does not take well with the dealers of San Francisco for it is good House Coal. If we are able to work the Island mine at a figure that will pay, we get some, at least, of the Houses occupied and should be in receipt of a small sum for Rents.

I have frequently had in mind the purchase of more of the Company’s stock, and of late have felt anxious to buy but since the shares have fallen, I have not been able to find cash to invest. Our trip to San F., Doctor’s bills for Mrs. Bate and improvements made on property here have well nigh absorbed any little surplus funds. The progressive wants of the family too call for rather more money than hitherto. I am glad however to take the three shares you

(Page 341) have been good enough to procure for me and would not mind accepting say fifteen more, if you could please obtain them at about the same figure, I regret to see the stock as low, but as our last half year working will show a loss in our books of about $3,000. I think, there will be no improvements in quotations yet a while. The closing sheets go on in two days from this.

For the last few months I have looked into the New Mine often but during the whole of that time, I am sorry to say, I could see very little done in the way of emerging coal. No.3 South Level has not been [tested?] for the past half-year or more. Mr. Bryden, fearing we may get more water, does not care to drive into the fault until we have a more powerful pump going. No 3 North was advancing very tardily, but now fair headway is being made. The slope filling with water is a great drawback. It is most vexatious to (Page 340) me to see these lower workings hampered and delayed. I do hope when the water is out for the third time, as it soon will be, that we shall be enabled to go ahead with further stoppages. You will see by my official letter that we have had a cave in the new mine. The water, bog etc. of a swamp through which you may perhaps recollect we made the Railway embankment, a little to the North of the Mouth of the Mine, broke in the upper workings and blocked the air course of the No 1 North Level, in much the same way, only not to the same extent as the No 4 Level of the old Douglas Mine which was filled by the break on New Years Day 1873. I do not expect this new break will be of any serious consequence. It will however necessitate a few hundred dollars [?] “in walling up” to prevent the peat getting into the driving of the Level and to dig a tunnel along the upper side of the swamp, and perhaps far up the [----].

According to the latest [--], I look for Mr. Rosenfeld to give me a call about the 10th of next month. I will write you soon after this visit next month. I should be heartily pleased to see Mr. Robins here though I suppose I cannot expect him [---] that Mr. Rosenfeld is coming. Might I suggest that July, August and September would be the best months to sojourner here, when the weather is good most days and the space easily got through and cleared. I am determined Mr. Robins to make the trip, kindly inform me in time. I should like to meet him in Victoria.

I am sorry I cannot say that Mrs. Bate is well. She is far from being strong but bears up bravely. Sally has grown quickly and is a valuable to her mama and the management of the House and family. Both Mrs. Bate and Sally ask to be kindly remembered to you. Can you inform me if Mr. Nicol is in Spain or in London? There has been some dispute regards the survey and boundary of his old [?] Farm. And I have promised to assist in getting the matter put right.

[THIS PORTION IS OVERWRITTEN AND BLURRED)

I am afraid if Mr. Bryden does not [-----------------------------] a certificate of [---------] that [Department--------------] lose it. His father-in-law is pretending some sort of title to it.

Hoping you are in good health and with very best wishes I am very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 342)

12 April 79

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Neil

Before this gets into your hands, you will have learned doubtless that Mr. Rosenfeld paid us a visit on the first trip on the Victoria. His stay here was short, but he made very good use of his time looking around, asking questions, and giving opinions on the matters concerning the Company generally.

Seeing the steamer around rocky point, I went to the wharf to receive Mr. Rosenfeld. Mr. Bryden was there also. And after a few minutes chat and a good look at the wharfs [sic], weigh house, and Railway bridge, we started out to the New Mine. A Mr. Dickey, one of the firm who had the contract for enlarging the Bastion, came as passenger with Mr. Rosenfeld.

Dickey is looked upon as a [---------] for [-------] gentleman, and he went into the mine with Mr. Bryden. After a walk around the pit top. Mr. Rosenfeld did not care to go down the slope, so I remained on the surface with him. He told me plainly that we were “far behind the times” with our pithead arrangements, and said that if we did not economize we should be distanced with a Keen competition that we might expect when South Wellington as well as Wellington is turning out coal for market. This gave me an opportunity to ask Mr. R. what effect he thought Chandlers would have upon us in the San Francisco market. He said he didn’t think we would be seriously hurt there but we might. He could hardly tell. He was very inquisitive. He wanted to know why we have almost done this, had not done the other and etc. and remarked you tip nearly all your coal on the ground and have to take it up again. (Page 343) “Why don’t you put up bunkers like other people? Bulkley had Bunkers”. I had to reply that I had been talking about bunkers, and the improvements for years.- but I was repeatedly suggesting their erection to Mr. Bryden and pointing out the advantages they would be to us when steamers or other vessels call and require quick dispatch. Mr. Rosenfeld addressed the same question to Mr. Bryden the latter [answered?] were to send out another 50 wagons but had not done so. He believed in wagons before bunkers, though he gave Mr. Rosenfeld to understand that bunkers would be put up. We returned from the mine and called at the office where Mr. Rosenfeld remained for quite a while. He looked over Books and read some pages of the Directors Diaries observing that I had sometimes noted where r when repairs were needed or improvement could be made. He said “don’t Mr. Bryden attend to these things?” As I hesitated to reply, he said “I want you to tell me Mr. Bate tell me privately, does not Mr. Bryden take notice when you make suggestion about anything” I then said “Well, he perhaps notices what I say but he takes his own course nevertheless.” Rosenfeld said “He neglects things and I shall tell him so. Your wharfs [sic] will cost three or four times as much to fix as they would if repaired in time, & etc.”

Not wishing to reflect hurtfully on my colleague, I made no reply beyond saying “that the wharfs [sic] were in bad condition, I had often mentioned to Mr. Bryden that we were incurring great risk of an accident in whipping coal over them.” Mr. Rosenfeld gave me a little praise in having things in good shape in the office. and he complimented Mark for his perseverance and told him he had heard a good deal about him from Ship’s Captains. Mr. Bryden and myself spent about 2 hours on the steamer with Mr. Rosenfeld, but excepting a few passing remarks, there was nothing said on the subject of the Company’s Business.

(Page 344 –2)

The following day we went to Newcastle Island. While there Mr. Rosenfeld quickly discovered and pointed out that Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. at the South Wellington Mine had bunkers to store coal. He likes the appearance of the Fitzwilliam bottom coal, several pieces of which I picked out of the heap. We talked over the question of reopening the mine-one question I told Mr. Rosenfeld, which, I thought principally hinged upon the possible sale of the coal. I added the San Francisco prices had been [over enumerative?] He tested our weighing machines by getting on himself and asked to be told how much he weighed. The larger Machine does not weigh pounds - nothing less than a quarter 100 weight and as he did not turn the scale at one cwt he could not get his exact weight. He said he was 110 pounds and thought the machine might be right at the Pithead machine he was weighed at a nicety. He told me he would do his utmost to sell all our coal and said (Page 345) and see the company paying something. If they could not “make in” the present state of the market they must nurse the property, and await the course of events. One good year or two would make up for lost time. I did not quite agree. He did not evince any desire to interfere with us, but said plain enough what he thought we should do to improve loading facilities, and put property and work on a good footing- particularly referring to Bunkers, Locomotives and wharfs [sic]. The 'Victoria' had a long and rough passage to San Francisco, and I doubt if she will prove a success as a collier. She is slow, and her running expenses are high. On her second trip, she was altogether too deeply laden- 1725 tons were put on board. She was in port only 53 hours. In order to give good dispatch, we had gangs of Chinamen and Indians loading from the bins of both [-] and (Page 344)`(3)

the miners of Chase River put in a couple of extra shifts: Those leaving the mine at 2 o’clock in the afternoon returned at ten at night, and those who gave over at ten came on at six next morning. By this little extra push, there was returned as the output for the 8th inst 1137 tons.

Wellington mine is slacking off lately - a number of men have been discharged, and trade is expected to be dull with D.D. & Co. the coming summer. Unless the South Wellington mine falls into the hands of our old opponents, it is not unlikely Chandler will make serious inroads into the San Francisco retail business. Dunsmuir must know this and he is active going through two or three channels to come to an understanding. Mr. Rosenfeld thinks they may hit upon some plan to amalgamate. Chandler, however, told me that (to use his own language) he intended “to paddle his own canoe”. Being on holiday yesterday, I took a walk in the direction of South Wellington, and went along a part of the Railroad I had not before been. The locomotive was making a trial trip, and as far as I could judge from seeing it pass me, it is the largest and most powerful engine in the District. (Page 345) (Left) The road too, except on the Incline, is well built. D. D. & Co., by the way, have lately got a new 12 ton Locomotive. They have two engines in good running order.

From my official letter you would learn that they have given over Boring on the West side of Diver Lake, and that they are to deepen the shaft they sunk some years ago near Departure Bay. If they should find good coal from the shaft, which is within a quarter of a mile of the company’s line, we may be almost sure it extends to and under the Estate & Mountain District. While I think of it, I may mention that Mr. Rosenfeld spoke freely of the intense hostile feeling, exhibited by Dunsmuir Diggle & Co to this company. Diggle, I understood him to say, was very bitter, but Mr. Rosenfeld does not appear to notice their spitefulness. The Lieutenant is continually scheming to do some business with the Pacific Mail Company. Our agent however is too much for him. l. C. F. Houghton, who you will perhaps remember ,applied with R George some two years ago for 1200 odd acres of [prime?] land in Nanaimo Harbour, is now a son-in-law of Dunsmuir’s. He married the daughter who has been a cripple for some years and sailed lately for England to see if his wife can be benefited by some skilled physician.

Mrs. Bate has been pretty well the last two weeks, which causes me to feel a little more comfortable than I have of late. I earnestly hope that you are in the enjoyment of good health and with very best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself, believe me

Dear Mr. Wild

very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 346)

14 July 79

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Permit me to thank you for your private note of the 3rd inst and for the enclosure which I was much pleased to receive. In his Dispatch of the 17th May, Mr. Robins spoke of your report and mentioned that he should have to refer to it again later on. On the 7th ultimo he wrote as follows “We often want to refer to the provisions of the ‘Mining Act’. On Tuesday last a question arose as to whether, in the event of an accident to Mr. Bryden or his absence or even in the event of his retirement from the Company, the regulations set in motion by the last would allow your employing, one of your present miners or viewers (such as Gillespie) to act as viewer or works manager? In this country, the person responsible for the safe conduct of the Colliery must be certificated [sic] by a Board of Mining Engineers and it is he and not the general manager who is called to account if an accident occurs. Is this so with you? and if so what was done when the Act came into operation to qualify Mr. Bryden? More than this the Board directs me to ask if in the event of any of the contingencies just mentioned i.e. in case of Mr. Bryden ceasing to act for the Company from any cause whatever could you find a man [now?] in the service of the company whom you

(Page unnumbered between 346 and 347) could with full confidence [select?] to act in Mr. Bryden’s place? I need hardly say that you must consider these questions as strictly confidential.

I inform the Secretary that we could at once make a temporary appointment pending the employment of a thoroughly competent man.

My daughter speaks in terms of great praise of the pleasure and enjoyment she was afforded at your City. For your kindness and that of your family, I feel very grateful.

We were glad to hear that Mrs. Rosenfeld has improved in health and hope she will soon quite recover. Mrs. Bate unites with me in sending kind regards to you both.

If any if your Family would like to come up this way we shall be delighted with their company.

Hoping you are well,

I remain,

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 347)

20th Sept 79

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Wild

You will begin to think I have forgotten your kind letter of the 22nd May but I have had it constantly in mind and now beg to thank you for it, and for your goodness and for procuring for me at less than half price Fifteen shares of our Company’s stock. The amount paid for the shares I have placed to credit of Head Office in the Book here. I daresay the Board will decide to pay off some of the [labourers?] seeing that notwithstanding the liberal remittances made the last half year our Bank a/cs here would be squared up at the end of June. The amount of our credit balances………………….?] exceeded the Debit. at Victoria i.e. after the L2000 pounds was sent off on the 1st July. A steady output like that of May last for instance, does wonders to reduce costs per ton, and quick returns at San Francisco enable us to make the best of small profits.

Among the many other subjects talked about when Mr. Rosenfeld was here, was that of cheap freights. I referred to the opportunities so frequently embraced by our Wellington neighbours to charter at low rates vessels calling at Victoria seeking [?]. They engaged one 2000 ton ship, I was informed, at $1.75 per ton! In his late letter to me, Mr. Rosenfeld says that he thinks it best to abstain from making further charters for the present – that it is desirable we should accumulate a stock of coal to draw upon to prevent the detention of vessels. This is no doubt correct [remainder of paragraph is blurred].

(Unnumbered page between 347-348)

take their turns in loading, as a rule were kept waiting long at Departure Bay than with us. [I know that………………………..of cheap to……. inform Mr. Rosenfeld ………likewise.?]

The South Wellington people are also quite sharp to take advantage of low freight.

It is astonishing to learn that there is the least desire to readopt the ruinously expensive system of carrying on the work and business which was followed in the five years from 1862 to 1867. You will well remember the unprofitable and useless outside staff that which was cut off and the beneficial changes inaugurated in the last [mentioned?] year, which led to an almost immediate improvement in the Company affairs – to a prosperous return entirely, I may say. Our position unfortunately has been altered and injured [over?] a

(Unnumbered page between 347-348) few years by rival concerns, one of which, the Wellington, I have always felt we might have easily cornered in its earlier days.

When I told Mr. Rosenfeld the Company was losing money, he said he could not understand it, but if we were, he thought a year or so of good prices would make recompense for bad times and, while talking over the same subject, he said the Company can sell this property, Mr. Bate, if they want to. He is a close – a shrewd observer of things and without doubt a very adroit manager of the coal business in San Francisco. It is surprising how he keeps note of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company despite Diggle's repeated undermining offers. You will learn Diggle called at New York on the way home. His present mission, it is said, is connected with the purchase or charter of steam colliers and doubtless their [operation to?] (Page 348) of the P.M S.S. Co was made in the hope of getting carrying trade for steamers..

The South Wellington mine is being quickly opened up and at this time is turning out 200 tons in the 24 hours. On the delivery of the first cargo in San Francisco. Mr. Chandler met with a hot opposition from Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. His (Chandler’s) [-] experience [-] tells me there was quite a run for South Wellington for domestic purposes the day the ‘Empire’ commenced to discharge it. Diggle did not like that [-] of his making [-] him to [-] or make an effort to keep his customers he commenced by allowing a rebate of 50 cents per ton which the [-] not to speak of [-] however and Chandler [-] were agent to purchase who discovered the underhand dealing and Chandler says [Wingate?] he’s just waiting for a chance to [D.D & Co?].

(page 348 Right)

[seems?] to be a good job.] It was done cheap, and the repairs to the old engine can be effected at a much more reasonable cost than was supposed. My only fear is that placing the engine in working condition may be put off too long. The leading engine at New Douglas mine was intended to pump and the fittings sent out from England were fixed in position when the other parts were erected. Two years ago, when I spoke to Mr. Bryden about getting a plunger pump in the Slope, he said we may put rods down where we have sunk the slope as far as it is intended to go. I have on several occasions pointed out that the plunger pumps gave very little […..?] in Douglas Pit , and I may here mention, by the way, that one of the Plungers has been under water, and out of reach down the great [pitch or patch] for [almost? about?] two years.

When the [Garforth Hessen?] pump was (Page 349) not the experience he speaks of as may prove an acquisition to the underground staff and management. The [-] surely is Shepherd’s work and Bryden tells me the new man found some mistakes in McKay’s drilling etc which did not surprise me, although I had told him that surveying being out of McKay’s line he would require to be carefully watched.

[Gallop?] mine and exploration was entirely stopped for the present. Sealed after three week strike, is going on again. Baynes Sound Co I hear is about to wind up [----] office has written to me enquiring if we would hire the Diamond drill.

The two old Locomotives ought unquestionably to have been put in running order long ago, and one, at least, beside the Nanaimo [-] always be fit for service when was required. The workers left (page 349) in the door- with two or three laden ships in port while now only one and he will make them suffer for their temerity. I innocently asked Mr. [-] how [-] would do it. “So” was the reply” by cutting down the price and not allowing them to sell, or if they do sell it will be [-] 50 cents on rebate. If competition is carried on in this way, some parties will get cheap coal.

Prior is anxious to assist the Company once again. In one of our official letters, I mentioned that a Mr. Shepherd had been engaged by Mr. Bryden to survey the mine and act as superintendent. [The next few lines are faded out]

He told me he was employed at Wellington Colliery about five [-] from New [-] and that he was at Puyallup in Washington Territory. He appeared an active young fellow and (Page 350) [-------] tried the workshops after Beck had attached an appliance to regulate the amount of the slide valve. It was said to work well and when started it went satisfactory for some days, but the valve soon began to [-] while in motion must have [-] and on the surface i.e. while working and doing no work it is [----] in the mine. The cause is partly attributed to wet steam although the steam well covered [--] the pump. By making a change in the [---] of the working, Beck believes he can succeed in putting the pump in a condition to go smoothly and do its duty. This, however, would be a work of some time and what Mr. Bryden [----] another pump from San Francisco.

News on Douglas pit at least the level going North opposite the No 4 has gone as (page 350) far as it can go for the cross fault. It is right on the patch and Mr. Bryden does not propose to go ahead in that direction, [OVERWRITTEN AND ILLEGIBLE FOR SEVERAL SENTENCES]

The later work going on in the No 6 is frightfully expensive, some six Chinamen are constantly engaged at a hand pump as you no doubt perceive in the Pay Sheet. The pump left [--] out which I have just referred to as a party was about to be [---] lower down the patch about opposite the No 5 but nothing has since been done there.

I have alluded in my official letter of this day to one sent out. I had recently written Mrs. Frew (sic) respecting her land at the mouth of the Nanaimo River. Mr. Bryden has [-] for some time that parties were negotiating for the purchase of [-] mineral rights yet he did not speak to me on the subject until after I had got the information from other parties.

Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co on Friday the 12th had another explosion at their mine which was not as serious as the former but considerable damage knocked out stopping, bratticing etc. (Page 350 top half) and, according to statements of those in the mine, gave the place a terrible shaking. Some of the Wellington miners are afraid to go to their stalls in the lower part of the mine- they do not consider it safe, and a few of the men have applied to Mr. Bryden for work but he does not employ them. I cannot help remonstrating here that as soon as Mr. Bryden heard of the Wellington explosion he left his post here fast. I have noted in the director’s diary and went to Harvey’s store. It seems strange to me, our employee as why Mr. Bryden showed so much concern himself about Wellington and [---] were freely made on this action as well as on the previous occasion. Our men all left the mine on the 12th and when they heard of the Wellington explosion and in agreement that someone might have carelessly fired a shot and left his place without returning [--] thoughtfully went through the mine to see that nowhere was fire existing [---] all was better.

I have had two letters from South Africa within the last three months. Alport and Emily are quite well. But they are somewhat discontented! Mrs. Bate, I am pleased to mention, is in better health than she has been the past year. She asks me to send kind remembrances to you.

Mr. Rosenfeld has said nothing more respecting a vessel to us this fall. I think he has been busy during the late election in helping the new governor Mr. Parkins in his [–]. Parkins is a fair minded man. I got acquainted with him in San Francisco.

With best wishes and hoping you are well.

Believe me my dear Mr. Wild

Most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 351)

22nd Dec 79

PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL

My Dear Mr. Wild

I was very sorry to learn by your kind note of the 10th Oct that I had caused you some anxiety by my delay in returning the transfer of the 15 shares you were good enough to procure for me. The document was forwarded with my letter, to the Board on 20th Sept and I doubt not it has safely reached you.

Mr. Diggle, I observe, called several times to see Mr. Robins, but if Diggle is as unreliable as his partner here I doubt if he will carry out any promise he may make; though it is possible he made promises, or offered suggestions, which might be calculated to be mutually beneficial. Personally, when here, Diggle appears always (Page 351) friendly enough, but he very often (so I hear from ship Captains, who I do not encourage to talk of him) speaking of the company with strong imprecations. Now, however, that Dunsmuir and Diggle have bought the South Wellington Colliery we have no other rivals in the Province and it would be better for both concerns to work amiably instead of evincing the unfriendly and spiteful spirit of opposition, that our neighbours have done. He might easily show that gain would result from our pulling together, and as I have stated in my late official letter, it will afford me great pleasure in bringing about an understanding. But the resident partner seems so elated that he is likely to continue his old course-“Work independently and do the best he can” It occurs to me that just now the position of our neighbour is not altogether impregnable. Buying out Admiral Farquhar and Capt. Egerton, and the acquisition of the South Wellington property, almost, so to speak, in one breath has in all probability necessitated a heavy loan from the bank which must of course be repaid with (page 352) interest. A certain quantity of coal has to be delivered to Mr. Chandler in a given time and unless they do a large paying business it will not be a light job for them to meet all demands. They may, therefore, be brought to act reasonably. And there is another ground which may induce them to come to some terms with us. Hilbert’s under the former proprietary [--] Dunsmuir & Diggle, Spalding tells me, were paid as salary ten (10) cents per ton each on all coal shipped. Hence whether the mine paid or not they made a good thing while sending away, as they have done, 10000 tons a month for past year. Their object seemed to have been to sell at any rate. I don’t know how they manage now, but they will surely wish to avoid giving coal away.

With respect to the question of wages, it puzzles me greatly to understand why Mr. Bryden should say we cannot mine coal as cheaply as our neighbours, I do not recollect making such an admission, except when referring to our [?] coal. At the new mine, there is no reason why nearly every stall should not be worked at. The same rate per ton as the Wellington Mine. Men are (Page 352) now digging at the South Wellington pit at 70 cents per ton, while we continue to pay 1.00 to [2.00]. Since I wrote my letter of the 20th to the Board, Mr. Bryden says it will be well to commence the reduction about the middle of next month, and he has notified a number of the men accordingly. He seems to me to act very strangely in dealing with this matter of bringing down wages. The very course that others take and carry out he appears to avoid and seems totally mixed up with his Father-in-law and crowd that he can hardly be expected to do anything against their interests, to go against their wishes. When South Wellington changed hands, it was rumoured Bryden was going there and Wingate & Chalmer managers and [?] told me in confidence that Bryden knew all about the negotiations for purchase & etc. and he added “I am not telling you what I hear, but what I know.” As you learn from my official letter, Dunsmuir’s men have been working since last June at 75 cents per ton and why some of our stalls have been started at least at that figure, I am at a loss to imagine. I have one opinion of my own (Page 353) that Mr. B. will, as long as he can put off the lessening of pay, because it is a business that might lead to an agitation which may disaffect Dunsmuir’s men, who I have before noted are working comfortably enough at 70 and 75 cents per ton. The former rate is paid at the South Wellington Colliery, which is a sort of asylum for unfortunates who are refused employment at either our mines or North Wellington, and in consequence have to go to South Wellington and work for what they can get. Our men have one great advantage of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co which perhaps you are not aware of. It is this: they can buy their goods, (provisions etc.) in town at least ten percent [?] than the Wellington men can purchase at Dunsmuir’s ‘break’ shop, as it is called, so that admitting if we like, our coal to be a little more difficult to mine than our neighbours the Nanaimo men have a set off.

I have written plainly as (Page 353) I believe you would wish me to do, and given my candid opinion of Bryden and our wages question. [overwritten]

A discovery made by [John Dick], which I have reported to the Board, will likely be a good help to me in exploring the ground West of the town. In preference to opening up South of Chase River, I think ,we should get at the coal Dick has found as soon as possible and work it. It can be reached, I believe, at much less expense than will the Southern portion of the Estate and the coal appears to be in a different class to any we are now working.

I have been thinking lately of that land at Departure Bay again which Bryden took up. And of which he has to obtain a certificate of Improvement and transfer to the Company. We could get a little revenue from it now if the company were [--]. That you may understand what Bryden agreed to in 1867, I beg to endorse an agreement which you made out and which perhaps may be referred to me [--] him that the matter has not been attended to.

There is a rumour in town come from Dunsmuir, I am told, that Rosenfeld has lost a large sum of money recently, in what way seems not clear.

Mrs. Bate I am pleased to state keeps in very good health and joins with me in sending very best regards to you. I will write again shortly. Always my dear Mr. Neil

Yours most sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 354)

29 March 80

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Many thanks for your private note of the 20th. Mr. Miller [---] the information that hundreds of men could be obtained from San Francisco; but most of our men only laugh at him and do not think we could get the men we want. Mr. Quogliotti, however and the ‘agent’ we have employed believe all the men we need can be engaged in our town. I am in hopes we shall not require strange miners, and I am today trying to get our men together with a view of inducing them to go to work. You know how I am situated with the colleague so closely connected and wrapped up with the enemy. The wages question with our men ought to have been decided months ago.

Dunsmuir made a reduction of 25% last June without any trouble, and he has been getting coal mined, or rather has had miners to work at from 25 cents to 40 cents per ton less than we have been paying all this time thus enabling him to make money which we cannot.

(Page 355) [?] wonder the directors do not see it is not to the interests of the Company to keep in their employ a very strong supporter and friend of a rival Mine!! It would worry me greatly to see any of our trade go to D.D. & Co.

I will write you again privately on the subject before long and in the meantime I hope I shall get our men to work. Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and myself and family, for yourself, Mrs. Rosenfeld and family and hoping you are well.

Believe me to be,

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 356)

7th April 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am much obliged for the copy of Mr. Robins letter. I share his feeling entirely, and I have told the Directors that it is my opinion that Mr. Diggle, while professing to wish for friendly understanding, has no general desire for it, and that in the meantime he will take every advantage of us in his power. The fact is our opponents know too much of our affairs. Nothing is easier than for Bryden to assist them directly and indirectly. Indeed, he seems very anxious for the vessels that are coming to us to go to Departure Bay, and Dunsmuir, in addition to employing our men, has, I truly believe, agents about encouraging the strikers to hold out. It is rumoured here that Diggle is negotiating with the Directors for the purchase of this property, and Bryden, as you know, has it in his power to make them sick of it, and be glad to sell. I earnestly hope you would never let the Estate fall into the hands of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co, and surely the Company would consult you before selling?

(Page 356)

You may be assured I am doing all in my power to get the men to work. I have paid agents employed among the miners to try to influence the fellows, but so long as they have hope of work elsewhere they have great encouragement to continue the strike. As you can see we should only have coal for the [Paramila?] and 'Victoria' – nothing for mail steamers or coasters. I should exceedingly like to bring the men to terms, either by starving them out or getting new men and the only way we can do it is by being firm, even if we have to buy a cargo or two from the enemy.

Believe my Dear Mr. Rosenfeld in great haste, yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 357)

13th April 80

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have just mentioned to my official letter of today the fact of Mr. Bryden tendering his resignation so that you may refer to it when writing to the Secretary. I am right glad Bryden has taken the step, and I hope, as it will be for the Company’s good, that the resignation will be promptly accepted. I do not think his head has been in his work for a long time and I think there is not the slightest doubt we can be better without him than with him. It was rumoured when the South Wellington mine fell into the hands of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co that Bryden was going there, and it is possible he is going there now, but it is much against the Company, and directly to Dunsmuir’s advantage. I, in various ways which you can readily understand, to have his son-in-law in our employ, who has as many opportunities to hurt me. The reason he (Bryden) gave me for resigning is “ Because the Company (Page 358) have left a settlement with the men virtually in your hands which he does not approve of!! He would have been quite pleased, no doubt, if you had let our business fall into his father-in-law’s hands! The cablegram I got from the Directors, (just before yours, stating that “decision was left to you) Ultimate decision left Rosenfeld but by compromise” I made known the substance of the above message to Bryden and by the feeling he exhibited it was plain to me he was annoyed because we did not buy coal from Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. I quickly told him you were acting for the Company interest and without doubt knew best what to advise and what to do but follow the instructions of the Directors. He then, as I have before stated, said he would resign. Now, I think it will be well to get rid of him quickly.

There is talk all around about D. D. & Co trying to get this company’s property and it is hinted that Diggle is buying a large number of shares to get control. It will be a bad job for me and the whole place if they now get possession of the Nanaimo mines.

With kind remembrances

yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 359)

15 April 80

My Dear Sir

I am not altogether surprised to learn by your valued note of the 16th ultimo that some of the Board infer from remarks I have felt it my duty to record in the Directors Diary from time to time that Mr. Bryden has at heart the interest of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co, nearly, if not quite as deeply, as that of this company. I was instructed, as you know, to note in the Diary the occurrence of events- frankly and without reserve and I have endeavoured faithfully to do so. But when I have noted any action or word of action on Mr. Bryden’s part it has been done more as a matter of information for the Board than in the nature of complaint. Nevertheless, I am aware of many circumstances which have lead me to believe that, for some time past, particularly the last year or two and especially of late, Mr. Bryden has had a desire rather to assist D. D. & Co. than do anything against them. You can readily understand what almost numberless opportunities my colleague has to help directly and indirectly our opponents, if he felt so inclined, and his close family relations to, and his very frequent intercourse with, the managing partner render (Page 360) it almost impossible he should not be guided and influenced by him to a certain extent. Mr. Bryden is very guarded in his talk with me whenever the business of our neighbour is the subject of conversation. I cannot, of course, avoid occasionally referring to them, but I can discern at times, from observations he does make, how he feels, and that he would wish nothing to interfere with their success or purposes. It has pained me to witness how slow our movements are as compared with the adjacent collieries, and to see, when looking at the Wellington pithead arrangements, the unnecessary expense we are put to in handling coal & etc. I naturally speak to Mr. Bryden of these things, but I can assure you and the Board I am careful to avoid areas in dispute. During the many years of Mr. Bryden and I have been associated, never an angry word has passed between us. As Mr. Bryden has resigned perhaps there is no need to go further into particulars.

I only hope the Company may obtain a good man in his stead, one who will work solely for it’s benefit, and it is probable such a man, free from local influences, and accustomed to Colonial life, may be found in this coast.

Thanking you for your letter

I am

my dear Sir

Yours most truly

M. Bate

Samuel M. Robins Esq.

(Page 361)

24th April 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private letters of the 10th and 16th inst I was much pleased to receive, and I entirely agree with you that we did right in resuming work. You are correct also in supposing that some good has resulted from the struggle. That is that we have effected a reduction, but the fact is the wages ought to have been lowered months ago. As far back as last May, when the Wellington men were given notice of a reduction, our miners were told our prices would be made to comply with those of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. yet nothing was done in the matter until just the time to move arrived. It does seem, look at matters how we will, that our mines are managed, so as to work into the hands of opponents and in such a manner as to allow them to make all the headway they can. This. However. I

(Page 362) hope will soon end by the prompt acceptance of Bryden’s resignation. There can be no good reason whatever why we should not get along better than we do and I shall be very much deceived if we do not always have the pick of the miners as soon as Bryden is away. Just imagine our Mine Superintendent recommending men to go to Wellington! You can see how easy it is for our opponents to be always supplied with miners whether we are or not and in more ways than I can name here things can be put in their way. It is difficult to tell if the miners can know what transpires in the telegraph office. Our opponents, I believe, made it known that you were sending us vessels, and there is no doubt they would have been heartily pleased to have seen our miners kept idle. The employment of our men, and one or two other moves they adopted, was all done apparently for that object. Perhaps, it would be well, to secure seeing of telegrams to use “Slater's Telegraphic Code”. The operators here have informed me that all Dunsmuir’s telegrams are sent in cipher. (Page 363)

If you please we can add say 88 to the number of the word sent to get the word really meant. I want to wire you that “Miners are going well” I send you words 88 before those quotes. I dare say you understand all this well.

I hardly think the Directors or Shakespeare’s would allow Diggle & his friends to acquire the Vancouver Coal Company property at their own price. As to the value of the Estate, machinery, tools buildings & etc.. I think it likely you may have one of the late half yearly reports of the Directors which will give the appraised (Page 364) value of the whole concern just as it is in our books.

There is some 7000 acres of land, which I will send you a small plan of in my next letter. How much of it contains coal has never been ascertained. More than half the property has to be explored by Diamond drill or otherwise, and I think you know that we have a first class Diamond boring machine. It has been proved the last 3 years that the Douglas coal underlies 1100 to 1200 acres of the South field, yet to be opened up, and the thickness of the coal there was found to be from 11ft. to 12ft. according to locality.

We are now (Page 363) going after the Wellington seam and, if it is found where we intend to bore, it is possible this Company has more of it by far than Dunsmuir Diggle & Co. Of course, if Diggle made any proposal to the Directors about the property it would have to be put before the shareholders in some form and it is scarcely probable that the Directors would wish D. D. Co. to be the owners! Another thing I should imagine our opponents have their hands pretty full buying out two of their partners, and acquiring the South Wellington Mine. Did you ever learn what Chandler sold for? (Page 364) Mr. Robins was informed by Admiral Farquhar that the price was $6000- cash down and 48,000 tons of coal to be supplied at the rate of 2000 tons a month during two years. The Admiral is expected here every day.

I am continually telling Bryden we want coal! But he does not appear to take much notice. In this matter it is very easy for him to cramp us and I do not think he is doing his best to increase the yield.

Accept from Mrs. Bate and myself our kindest regards for yourself Mrs. Rosenfeld and family, and believe me

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

most truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 365)

7th April 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind letters (private) of the 27th and 30th ultimo are before me, and for which allow me to thank you. I am pleased that you sent me a copy of Mr. Robins' letter and I should like, if I am not asking too much, to get a copy of his letters for some little time to come. They will help me in my explanatory details regarding our position, as well as give me an insight to the course the Directors are likely to take in the matter of Bryden and our opponents, I had a private letter from the Secretary respecting Bryden but while I let it be understood that he is not the man for us, owing to his connections, etc, I, as he had resigned, did not say much. My feeling in the matter I have no doubt is understood.

Will not the Secretary think the letter I wrote to you rather a strong one? And will he not infer that we had been corresponding on the subject of it? If he could be made to understand that you wanted my opinion, he would perhaps see the matter in a good light. I dare say, however, you made things clear enough.

I have explained pretty fully to the Board, the peculiar position our neighbours, by their intrigue, might have placed us in with reference to the strike. At first, I thought we might beat the miners by buying a few cargoes of coal from the ‘enemy', but (Page 366) when I saw that our striking miners were being engaged at Wellington, it occurred to me they might continue to do that, and so not only get our business, but our men also! and eventually we should have been left pretty much without one or the other!!

My candid opinion is, and I told Mr. Wild so in a private note, that, as almost everybody in the place knows, under different mine management our works would undoubtedly have been in a much better position today than they are. I have no time today to make the sketch map of the Company’s land which I promised you, but I will send it on for your information very shortly.

With kindest regards

Believe me dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate.

(Page 367)

15th May 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private letter of the 5th instant, and the ‘copy‘ I was very glad to receive, and I am extremely obliged to you for these both. In sending the letter, you will observe you have anticipated my request. I quite concur that we did right in resuming work when we had a good opportunity and I am gratified to find that Mr. Robins is beginning to think that way. I am keeping him well informed of all our doings, and perhaps when it is known that we are gainers by putting an end to the strike, the Directors will be pleased rather than otherwise. As I informed you in a previous letter, I have written Mr. Robins privately respecting Bryden. Could you send the extract from my letter to him privately so that he could show it to the Directors or not as he pleased? He might not think it well to let the Board know the nature of the private correspondence at this end, that is, between you and me! Pray do as you think best, but I have been a little careful not to appear too bitter in writing home for fear of overdoing the thing.

I have “Slater’s code” and can send you a copy if you do not get one.

I dare say you will watch Dunsmuir’s movements. He is a most unreliable man (Page 368) and needs watching closely.

My son Mark takes a trip by the ‘Victoria”. He has had a good deal of confinement lately and I think the voyage will do him good.

With kindest regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

I remain

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

very truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 369)

9 June 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Since my last private note to you I am glad to say I have got around alright have almost quite recovered from the accident I met with and do not anticipate any ill effects whatever.

In his last letter to me, Mr. Robins says: “ There is no doubt Mr. Rosenfeld was justified in urging the Board to cease the struggle with the men,” and he intimates that we should run no risk of throwing business into our opponent's hands. By this time, or soon after, you will be hearing something on the subject of Bryden’s negotiations. He has not referred to the matter lately, and of course, I say nothing to him on the subject.

It is rumoured Dunsmuir made a large contract with the Railway company for the delivery of coal at Wellington and elsewhere. I have not seen him since he returned from your city.

I send in care of Capt. Hayward “Slater’s Telegraphic Code” addressed to you. We can always use the name of a Mine when necessary, and in fact I suppose we need only use the code when secrecy is required. If you please we will add 88 to the words we wish to have read –thus: I want to say “man struck” I do not find the word “men” in the book so I send that as it is, but opposite the word struck there is 21755

To which I add 88

21843

and opposite 21843 we find the word ‘succeeding’, so that I would wire, for “men struck” men succeeding.

Hoping yourself and family are well and with kindest regards to you all.

Believe me, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 371)

18th June 80

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am glad to be able to say that I have pretty well got over my late accident, and am around as usual. The enclosure in your private note of the 8th inst I have read with much interest, but it seems to me, not withstanding all that has been said, the Directors hardly comprehend the situation, While admitting the undesirability of having Bryden in the Company’s service, it is remarked “that no disloyalty in his conduct can be detected, and it is not expected he would do anything to the Company’s “prejudice!”. Not openly, of course, but use the opportunities afforded to do just what Dunsmuir would wish in different matters without being actually known to do it, particularly to the Directors. In his letter to me of the 14th ultimo Mr. Robins says he “has letters from you of 23rd April containing information received from me of the 15th April announcing the resignation of Mr. Bryden. Upon this subject my Directors are impatiently awaiting a report from you, and until this arrives no instructions can be sent you. Certainly when you advised the Board of Mr. Bryden’s retirement (Page 372)

you explained without reserve your views as to what you considered the best course to take in filling the vacancy”.

I shall now soon have letters in reply to mine, and I will acquaint you of the instructions sent by the Directors..

The Chief Engineer of our Fire Company, has asked me to request you to kindly inform me if you can [?] the price of good bells say 150 to 200 tons steel, and bell metal. We do not know which is regarded as the best. Garrett, I think is the name of the firm in your City, who keep or make Bells.

Dunsmuir is sending away a large quantity of coal somewhere. He must be making lots of money. He is buying steamboats, and securing the towing [?] and will take away. [?] Perhaps he is getting too many irons in the fire.

Wishing you best wishes

I am Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 373)

28th. June 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private note of the 15th with enclosure I duly received, and please allow me to thank you for both of them. I have a few lines from Mr. Robins as late as the 29th ultimo. He says with reference to Bryden “Mr. Bryden’s resignation has been received, but no steps have yet been taken by the Board to fill the vacancy. Mr. Bryden’s letter arrived on the morning of the General meeting, and was allowed to stand over until the next Board meeting. The next letters I get will no doubt contain something definite; but you will probably hear first what is proposed to be done.

You are correct about old Dunsmuir. He is just getting right again. The old gentleman seems to be turning attention to me, and appears to think I am in their way. I understand he or his friends are complaining to the Directors about me. He may rest assured I shall put nothing in his way, and I know he can hardly bear the idea or my being so placed as to prevent his having partial control of our mine as well as his own.

Will you kindly have the enclosed letter posted for the Co?

I send you a small Map showing the Company’s property as coloured red. Altogether there is over 7000 acres. The sketch may be useful to you for reference.

Mrs. Bate joins me in asking to be kindly remembered to your family & yourself.

and believe me

very truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 374)

9 July 80

Private

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours (private) of the 28th ult with enclosure, I have perused with great interest.

Like yourself I have heard nothing from the Secretary since I last wrote. His latest letter was dated 29th May. Bryden has a Brother-in-law here- another son-in-law of Dunsmuir’s- named Houghton who I hear is intimate with Mr. Irwin, one of our Directors and I also hear he has been corresponding with Mr. Irwin for some little time. Now, this Houghton is one of the family, and lives with his wife, who is a cripple, at the old Dunsmuir’s. They are combining, I am privately informed, to injure me and I have no doubt they will throw lots of mud in the hope that some of it will stick. Bryden does not appear to take much interest in our business. His visits into the mine are not as frequent as formerly, and I am of opinion he has something ready to go to. Could you ascertain by any means if Bryden has anything to do with South Wellington? It is said he is mixed up with it some how.

May I trouble you to order for the “Nanaimo Fire Department” one of the 192# Bells made of Bell Metal? We should like it sent direct by the ‘Idaho’. The amount of the Invoice will be promptly remitted.

With best wishes,

I am, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 376)

21st July 80

Private

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am obliged for your private letter of the 6th. inst. Mr. Diggle arrived here on the 17th and I think he is spending his time out at the Wellington Mine. I have a notion that Diggle is as bitter as Dunsmuir. I never trouble them, nor pay any particular attention to anything they may do. I believe it is a fact Diggle made some proposition to take over or work our mines but it is said the proposal was not entertained. Things will look better with us by and by I hope. Nothing has come to me from the Directors since the letter dated 29th May. It is years since I was so long without a letter. I think Bryden has a notification that his resignation has been accepted. He does not seem to trouble much about the works, and in fact I see very little of him.

With best wishes

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 377)

24th July 80

 

Dear Mr. Wild

I have not addressed you for some months. It has often occurred to me, since the “strike” which took place on March, that I ought to send you a few private lines. My last two letters were directed to 8 Forbes Buildings and I am not certain that you received them, although reference being made some time ago in an official Dispatch to the Preemption Claim at Departure Bay, and Mr. Robins private note of 6th March lead me to suppose that the letters safely reached you, and I venture again to use the same address.

You may have thought, perhaps, that it would only have been right to mention a [line off page] in my reply to Mr. Robins to show why I believed Mr. Bryden had a leaning towards Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. I thought upon reflection that his (B’s) resignation would relieve me of any necessity for that. But I will tell you a case or two in point. (1) a steady young miner applied to Mr. Bryden for work, he is recommended to go to Wellington (2) Another man comes from Wellington and wants work at our mines, and he honestly tells M. Bryden, when asking for a job, that he is barely making a living etc. Mr. Bryden advises him to stay where he is. (3) E. Walker, when our wharves were in danger of falling apart, was told to go to Mr. Bryden (by myself) and enquire if he could go on with the repairs. The answer was “he had nothing for him to do at present.” Walker was sent for a day or two after to drive piles etc at Departure Bay. Without knowing that Walker was away, I asked Mr. Bryden if he had seen him. He told me “Walker was working for Dunsmuir” but did not tell me Walker had been to him for work. On the contrary he said he had been looking for Walker! (4) Before South Wellington was acquired by D. D. & Co [faded words] (Page 378)

account whatever - dangerous mine to work, full of gas, Coal full of [‘slope’s’?] with numerous disadvantages were attached to it. After Chandler sold out, it suddenly became in his estimation, a different sort of place altogether. Here I would like to remark that young Mr. Chandler, who was here when the transfer of South Wellington was made, has associated Mr. Bryden’s name in the purchase, in what way I have never troubled to inquire. Many instances of this kind have been brought to my notice, but let the foregoing suffice. I could name others of a different complexion, and there is one more particular case that I ought I think to make known to you. In November last, two miners working together as partners at the New Douglas mine quarreled and came to blows. The one charged the other with assaulting him, After hearing the case in the Police court, Mr. Bryden asked me which of the two I thought was to blame. I told him, and he thought I was right. Neither of the men afterwards would work with the other and the stall was given out to the one who Mr. Bryden considered was in the wrong. I wondered about that but said nothing about it. The stall it appears was a good one and as there was a talk at the time of wages coming down, the man who did not get the place went to Mr. Bryden, before it was decided which of the two was to have it and offered to work it at 75 cents per ton. It was given to the other party at $1 per ton! Bear with me also please while I give a reason or two for stating why I thought Bryden contemplated resigning before the “strike.” He had given me hints that he should do so, but appeared to be waiting for some favourable opportunity. He had invited Archibald Muir to accompany him to the West Coast of the Island near Koskeeno to examine a seam of coal and I expect, by and by, they will make a journey thither. When asked by Muir why he wanted to leave the Company, he said that he had something better to go to. We shall see what the “something better” is.

I was exceedingly gratified to learn by Mr. Robins official letter of the 24th April when reference was made to a complaint sent by Mr. R. Dunsmuir through Mr. Diggle, that the Board have never been ready to listen to charges originating in that quarter. I do all I [can?][-] to use Mr. Robin’s (Page 379) words “to keep aloof from petty squabbles”, on any and every account and attend to my own affairs. I have no object in the world but to protect the Company’s interest and whoever does that is sure to rouse the ire of our neighbours, who never seem to grow weary of “throwing mud” [and even?] especially at myself. The South Wellington License, for which a requisition was presented [-] by Chandler’s manager and all his [-] and about which complaint was made was granted sometime before D. D. & Co brought out Mr. Chandler and it was because the names of the hotel (sic) and [-] House Mr. Quaglotti (sic) would not sell on Dunsmuir’s terms that he tried all [--] he could conceive to have the license taken away, but he did not succeed and had to give fair price for the property at last. If the proprietors of South Wellington [-] oppose instead of asking for a license it would certainly have been granted. While writing of Dunsmuir’s complaints, you would notice, no doubt, that I asked if the Board would kindly consent for us to have a look at an anonymous letter mentioned by Mr. Robins in the dispatch before referred to. My reasons for making such a request is that it came to my knowledge of forming (sic ) his acquaintance. (3) Referring to the anonymous letter writing. I may as well tell you that Dunsmuir, the elder, has lately has had one of his periodic drinking bouts, and while in a jolly state of mind he told the proprietor of the ‘Free Press’ that Bryden had sent in his resignation to the Company and that he (Bryden) knew what he was doing. The newspaper man did not understand why Dunsmuir should have talked to him of such a matter. Dunsmuir said further that communications had been sent home by a person independent of the Company who is acquainted with the Directors and that he, Dunsmuir, was aware of it. The ‘independent person’ I take it to be Houghton. He has been living with Dunsmuir and Bryden and occasionally staying at Harvey’s since he came from England, and I am a little anxious to know what [these parties?] have been planning. I need hardly say that my opinion is. Anything Mr. Irwin writes to the Colonel may as well (Page 380) be sent to Dunsmuir. In fact, he (D) speaks sometimes of “hearing from our Directors”. I presume it must be through his sons-in-law. Wonder if Houghton still wants the Federal lands of Nanaimo Harbour and that meadow in the mouth of Chase River?

These personal matters you will be tired of reading, and it is time I changed the subject. It is about a month since I received a Dispatch from the Secretary. I have consequently heard nothing yet as to what the Board proposes to do in the case of Mr. Bryden’s resignation, and being unauthorized, I do not feel justified in taking any action in the matter out here. Archibald Muir would make a good superintendent and we have other good men among our miners, but they all perhaps lack the degree of technical information which may be considered essentials. Miners for some time past have been speaking of undergoing an examination with a view to obtaining a Manager's Certificate.

The day before yesterday Mr. Bryden maintained that he had instructions to take the water out of Douglas Shaft and to clear it. I understood that’s the Chase River Seam. Seeing the ‘barrier’ presented by the down fault at the foot of the slope on New Douglas level, I think it is urgently necessary to look for

(Page 381) more coal elsewhere. Mr. Bryden seems to have given up the idea of sinking further at the slope bottom. The hole was sunk down, in following the seam, is being partially filled up as I explained in my last official letter. I hardly see what prospect there is of getting past the fault. It was supposed at one time, while the sinking was going on, that should the coal be found good, and to go off with it's regular grade, the hole might to be turned into a shaft, in which case it would have been requisite in order to mine any extent of coal, to have gone some distance below the seam, and to have back-mined. Then Mr. Bryden has spoken of deepening the Douglas Incline to get below the pitch in the old mine. In my next official letter, I intend to refer to the matter of new openings. I have been out to the Bores this afternoon, and found Hunter down 102 feet. He was cutting a black hole which it is thought not far from the coal. The Diamond Drilling machine is striking where core resting is being [-] at Victoria. We have been most unfortunate with this [-] Diamond [-] A shaft could be put down to the present depth for about the money it has cost.

At the [-] shaft South of Chase River we have been unfortunate too. The coal was not found.

[THE REST OF THE LETTER IS NOT LEGIBLE]

signed M. Bate

(Page 382)

25th Jul 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

By the mail which brought me your kind private letter of the 15th, I received a letter from Mr. Robins dated 25th ultimo (the same date as he wrote to you) but he does not in his letter to me refer to the accident I met with, an account of which he states he saw in the Nanaimo paper. As newspapermen usually do, the Nanaimo editor made matters rather worse than they were. Referring to Mr. Bryden, Mr. Robins says “The Board have notified Mr. Bryden that they have acceptd his resgnation which according to the agreement between him and the Company will take effect on the 17th November, six months after his notice was received here. The Directors are not prepared at present to make any appointment to fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Bryden’s resignation. You need not therefore, until further advised, take any steps to procure an Engineer on your coast. I shall shortly write you in full upon the matter which the Board are now well weighing”. Rumour still has it that Mr. Bryden is going to Wellington, where I think his heart has been for a long time past, and it would have been well for the Company had he gone to Wellington two or three years ago. I highly appreciate your well timed remarks touching Houghton’s letter writing. He is a worthless fellow and that no one out here would take any notice of but Dunsmuir probably finds it convenient to use him. Mr. Diggle goes to your city by the 'Chester’ I believe. I have just seen him and that is all.

The Purser of the 'Victoria' last trip presented a Bill for $105.00 for freight of 400 kegs [?]. This charge is double what we have ever paid before and I asked if the Bill could not be modified? It was stated that the same rate of freight is charged Onderdonka & Co. but finally, Capt. Hayward and the Purser promised to represent the matter at San Francisco with a view to getting a reduction. The freight is over a cent a pound, which seems high.

Mrs. Bate, Sallie and Mark wish to be kindly remembered to yourself and family and accept best wishes from

Yours very truly,

M Bate

(Page 384)

7th August 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have to thank you for your private note of the 29th ultimo

Nothing later than I mentioned in my last has reached me from the Secretary. I believe, however, there is an Engineer coming from Home to inspect our works, and it may be that until he reports, the Directors will not decide upon a successor to Mr. Bryden. It is reported that a brother of Mr. R. [Nuigate?], Chandler’s Engineer, has gone to England to apply for Bryden’s place. I do not know anything of the gentleman but it is said he did not give satisfaction to his last employers at Coos Bay. I have mentioned to the Sect y. that we have several good men among our own employees who might be safely entrusted with superintendence of the mines, until a permanent appointment is made.

By order from Home, we are getting the water out of the lower seam in Douglas Shaft. Perhaps the object is to have thorough examination made of all our mines . Fitzwilliam will be cleared too.

We are not getting along very well with explorations for the Wellington seam back of the town. This month ought to tell if we shall find anything of it.

(Page 385)

It came from Dunsmuir himself that Diggle had said something to the Directors about taking our miners. At least I was so informed. I will try to learn about the matter.

As I am writing I am given a telegram from Capt. Hayward advising me he will be here on the evening of the 10th.

With very best wishes

I am Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 386)

16th Aug 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have your private lines of the 31st ultimo and 3rd instant with enclosures for which I am extremely obliged.

The Firemen were well pleased with their Bell, and I have pleasure in sending you a cheque in payment of the Bell viz: $95.85.

Mr. Bryden has a letter from Mr. Robins giving the name of the inspecting Engineer who is coming out, and who is expected shortly; the name is [Inscock?] and I fancy I have seen the name associated with [Earl?] Fitzwilliam Collieries in Yorkshire. He is sure to have letters to you. After meeting him, you will know if it is advisable to talk to him much until after his visit. He will likely be a little [-] inquisitive, and I shall be glad to get your opinion, after a chat with him as to what you think he can do for us. He is no doubt a first (Page 387) class man of his profession and in that case will soon perceive weak points in our mechanical applications- that is see many arrangements by which labour can be saved. Although no professional mining Engineer, I can see lots of room for improvement around our works, Bryden is putting things in order a little. It is natural he should wish to make the mine look as well as he can. After leaving us, Bryden might visit his brother East; but I hear from several sources that he is eventually expected to go to Wellington.

Purser Varney made 400 kegs of powder measure 10 tons. We make it 6 1/3 tons; I have paid the freight Bill, and wrote Messrs Goodall & Perkins on the subject of it.

I was aware of Mr. Dunsmuir sending a man to see Chandler’s mine and he (John Dick) told me what he thought about it. Your idea was a good one to have someone find out what Chandler's prospects are, and there is no doubt the Company will refund your costs. I shall never breath a word I have learned from you on the subject.

The newspapers state the 'Dakota' will continue to come to Victoria. If it is so, you will be aware of it.

With best wishes

I remain

yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 388)

1st. Sept 80

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I was in Victoria when I wrote to you last, and on Sunday 29th your private note of the 23rd was handed to me.

When I arrived home, I found a telegram from Mr. [Jeffcock?] reading “Engage best accommodation for two. Sail Monday for Nanaimo”. It was reported in Victoria that Mr. Wild was coming and I therefore wired you to know who was with Mr. [Jeffcock?]. I received your reply yesterday morning reading “his cousin” they would like rooms at the hotel”. I could find plenty of room in my house, but they perhaps prefer to be alone and together at one Hotel. Bryden is cleaning up and making things look as well as he can in various directions- attending in fact to some little matters that have been neglected for years.

In a letter to me of 2nd August, Mr. Robins says “Mr. Jeffcock will be empowered to arrange the appointment of a substitute for Mr. Bryden, and he will be armed with full powers in respect of all matters concerning the Company”.

I daresay you would speak to Mr. Jeffcock respecting the screening of Coal etc. At any rate, his attention will soon be drawn to the question as he looks around. He will stay long enough probably with us to ascertain thoroughly the position of the Mines and our prospects for the future. I will be on the lookout for him.

With kindest regards, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld.

yours sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 389)

8 Sept 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

A thousand thanks for your private letter of the 30th. ultimo. Your good word and good will I know are invaluable to me, you can scarcely conceive how much I value and appreciate so strong a friendship. My calumniators are well known, and I can truthfully say that where I drink one glass of beer they drink a dozen glasses of whiskey. I never neglected a days business in my life through drink. I have always considered myself a moderate and a small drinker, and can do quite well without taking intoxicants at all. As to my playing the fiddle, I do help once or twice a year, at our local concerts and other entertainments, but surely there can be no harm in that. I also play a cornet with our amateur Brass Band and pass a few hours pleasantly in that way. Surely that can’t be wrong. I shall act upon your very kind advice- shall let Mr. Jeffcock see that I am not over fond of the glass, that I do not care for it at all and there give him an opportunity of carrying to the Directors information which will disprove the reports which may have reached them I think I have mentioned to you before that it is a Son-in-law of old Dunsmuir, Col. Houghton, they call him, who writes to Mr. Irwin, but it is amazing the Directors or any one of them, would notice anything emanating from such a quarter. The Col. is a lazy fellow, who has nothing to do and

(Page 390) he occupies his time in slandering and similar evil practices. I remember Mr. Robins told me that Houghton called at the company’s office when he went to London with his wife, and Robins said that he Houghton did not prepossess the board very favourably. Houghton is a worthless fellow and I do not think he is worth noticing further.

Mr. Jeffcock has written you on the subject of coke: he thinks we can make good coke and says he understands from you there would be a market for it. I followed your recommendation of offering him accommodation at my house, but did not press him. He said he would gladly have accepted my kind invitation had he been about to stay only a day or two. As, however, he might be here some little time he thought he would stay at a Hotel. I think I have got him comfortable quarters. I will write you often privately if Mr. Jeffcock expresses opinions regarding matters that I know will interest you and use the Telegraphic Code if he gives me more hope of getting more coal! He has agreed to invite tenders to make a search for coal at the bottom of Douglas Shaft and I think he will have our exploratory work pushed on a little faster than it has been. You will have an opportunity of communicating occasionally with Mr. Jeffcock perhaps, and he will most likely be writing to you.

With many kind remembrances,

I am Dear Mr. Rosenfeld,

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 391)

18th Sept 1880

Nanaimo B.C.

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind personal favor of the 8th is before me for which I am very much obliged.

Mr. Jeffcock keeps himself quite busy inspecting mine places and mine workings and is laying out a program for the future. He greatly understands his business; he does not say much but when talking to him of the chance for getting more coal out [?] cannot see any immediate prospect of it. He says [?] must pay for it and he is striving hard, I believe, with this aim before him.

I am really sorry about the 'Austria’s' affair. Mr. Read, however, is clearly wrong in his statements, I say a certified invoice was given to the Captain of the ship here. You will please observe that Mr. Read says ‘we gave Bills of Lading signed as required by two merchants, but did not give an Invoice certified in that manner. Now we never got a Bill of Lading so signed nor do I think Mr. Read can produce one. It was the Invoices which were signed by two resident merchants, one of which was handed to Capt. Morrison by my son under cover, and accompanied by a letter of which the following is a copy.”

8th May 1880

Nanaimo

The agent Mail Steamship Co.

Acapulco, Mexico

Dear Sir

Enclosed please find copied invoice of a cargo of two thousand one hundred and thirty five [?] tons of Nanaimo Coal shipped on board the [?] ship ‘Austria' for account and consigned to your company.

Yours very truly

for the Company

M. Bate

Manager

per Mark Bate [?]

(Page 392)

Capt Morrison without doubt got the letter etc. It does not seem reasonable that he would, under any circumstances, leave us without something in the shape of shipping papers for his consignee. Mr. Read further says: ”The Invoice sent him had no Citizen's names on it”. Now if Mr. Read can either furnish a Bill of lading of ours of the ‘Austria’s’ cargo with residents merchants names upon it or can show us an invoice of said cargo without such names I will pay the $200.00 out of my own pocket, and would do so after what you mention regarding the remittance sent to Mr. Read without further questions if I thought this office was to blame. For the present, Capt. Morrison, I believe is the person who ought to be held accountable for the loss of the latter.

With reference to Mr. Dunsmuir, I never troubled him and I am sure he has no personal grounds to be unfriendly with me. But he is seldom concise in his talk, and it is when he seems most friendly that I watch him. I will do as you wish in the matter and chat with Mr. D a little oftener than I have done of late.

With very best wishes

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 393)

26 Sept 80

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have your private note on the 16th before me, for which I beg to thank you. I think Mr. Jeffcock will find out that is only the Company’s [----] who have anything to say about me. I attend, as I have always done, faithfully to my duties and watched carefully the company’s Interest. I have not said much to Mr. Jeffrock regarding out affairs, except in answer to his questions. He has not yet said a word about a successor to Mr. Bryden, nor yet said anything about it, except hinting that he is too slow –behind the times etc. He is having several beneficial changes made in our screening arrangements etc. and is setting upon a plan of working which I believe will have the effect of reducing costs. He is just the man to see where we can improve things and he is getting things attended to that I have wanted some years ago. He tells me he thinks of leaving us by the next trip of the ‘Victoria’, so if he has anything to do about Bryden he will have to do it soon. I believe Bryden has offered to remain after his time is up, if wanted, for a month or two. We can do just as well without him and I hope the Directors will let him go promptly when the term of his notice expires.

We are searching away for the Wellington Coal, and in one of our bores we ought to be near to it. I sincerely trust we shall strike it good.

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 394)

8 Oct 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private note of the 28th ultimo I was glad to receive.

Since I last sent you a few private words, Mr. Jeffcock has been rather more communicative. Has given me his opinion pretty freely of Bryden which is anything but favourable. He has satisfied himself, I believe, that I am not the dreadful character he might have been led to believe and I have hopes he will inform our Directors that the reports of the Company’s enemies are gross libel. Bryden is to leave on the 17th of next month. Old Dunsmuir has been telling a long tale about your not buying but from him during our ‘strike’. I have said I could not believe they had any desire to help us, and that I was sure you understood the situation and acted solely for the Company’s interest. I further told him that you could give him good reasons for not letting our customers go to their mine and that I did not think our opponents were sincere. Dunsmuir gave copies of telegrams (to Mr. Jeffcock) which passed between him and his son, which copies Mr. Jeffcock has. You will know I am sure how to meet him on this question, although since it is all over, he does not care much about it. If he expresses any (Page 395) opinion with regard to myself, I shall be glad if you will convey it to me. What business we have transacted together and all our conversations have been of a most friendly and, I think, satisfactory character. He has frankly admitted to me that Bryden’s department wanted changing and he will probably tell you more.

I don’t think Mr. Jeffcock is a man that Dunsmuir could deceive.

With many kind wishes

with many kind wishes yours truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 396)

15th Oct 80

STRICTLY PRIVATE

My dear Mr. Rosennfeld

After I penned you a few lines at Victoria Mr. Jeffcock had a final interview

with Mr. R. Dunsmuir, and one of the last things he (Mr. Jeffcock) told me in confidence, was that Mr. Dunsmuir had made an offer through him for our Company’s mines and property. The offer was to pay three per cent per annum on the paid up capital of the company and buy the whole concern in 10 years at the same price I believe as the shareholders have paid up. Mr. Jeffcock does not think the offer will be acceptable in London, but as no returns to speak of have been forthcoming for some time it is hard to say what the proprietors may do. Dunsmuir’s 3% would only amount to about $12000.00 per year and it may pay our opponents to keep the place at a standstill at that figure that is, buy off the opposition. I hope Dunsmuir will never get the property on any condition, and I feel sure you will spare no effort to prevent him. Perhaps Mr. Jeffcock will speak to you on this matter. If he does not, please do let me know that I am aware of it. I believe there are one or two coal properties for sale up this way, and such property is sure to be very valuable some day.

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 397)

23rd Oct 80

PRIVATE

My dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private note of the 8th and 16th inst are before me. I almost

feel certain that Mr. Jeffcock found out that Mr. R. Dunsmuir is both unreliable and untruthful. I hear from several sources that Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are doing their utmost to get this company’s property, that if the proposal they have already made is not acceptable they are prepared with another. Dunsmuir says so, I am informed, that the Agency profits will amount to more than he offers to pay the company annually. I have no doubt he thinks the time very opportune to make a proposal, and he has most likely been looking for a good chance. It is currently reported that Bryden is going to Wellington. I presume as you have not referred to the proposition of D. D. & Co that Mr. Jeffcock did not mention it to you.

With best wishes

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld,

always yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 398)

28th Oct 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am very much obliged for your kind and interesting letter of the 20th instant. Mr. Shepherd is a new man who has only been with us a little over a year. He is steady and energetic though rather young. I shall get him to consult freely with the overman (Bolton) whom you saw here and shall be frequently in his presence myself about the works. I think we shall get along comfortably. I shall look pretty closely into the expenditures in all directions and do the utmost to retrench and economize. I only wish the ‘New Mine” as we call it, was in the same position today as it was two years ago but we can soon alter things so it is.

As you do not refer to old Dunsmuir’s offer to Mr. Jeffcock, I presume he did not inform you of it. By Bryden’s action, I imagine he fancys [sic] his father-in-law will get this place sooner or later. I hope such a calamity will never occur.

Mrs. Bate wishes to say she is very sorry to hear of Mrs. Rosenfeld’s illness. We hope she is quite recovered. Kindly remember us to her and accept for yourself the united regards of Mrs. Bate and

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 399)

6th. Nov 81

My dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have to acknowledge with thanks your private letters of the 26th and 29th ultimo.

The rumour Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co negotiated with the Company is quite current here. I think our Directors should turn round and offer to buy the Wellington Mine on the same terms as Dunsmuir proposed, that is pay 3 % on the paid-up stock or capital! The mere thought of Dunsmuir getting possession of this property is injuring. The lower-improvements are being stopped and business men seem quite alarmed, because it means ruin almost to some of them who have invested largely in town property. In an official letter to the Directors yesterday, I referred to the matter for the first time and I hope, in order to restore confidence and to stop Dunsmuir short, that they will at once flatly put down their feet in this scheming.

With very best wishes

yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 400)

20th Nov 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am glad you will recommend the Directors to let it be understood that Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co cannot trifle with us. The constant talk of “buying out the Vancouver Coal Company” can have no other effect than to depreciate the value of the Company’s Town property. Now that Bryden is gone, I will use all the energy I possess to stir up matters in the mining department which I have not hitherto interfered with to any extent. I have several times lately been into the mine and I think the falling off our output will not amount to much yet awhile. Mr. Jeffcock did not think we could keep it up very long at our present working. I trust, however, the mine will hold out quite as well as expected. The worst season per exploring is (Page 401) now close upon us. We shall persevere, however, unless the weather becomes too unfavorable for us to continue with advantage. Wellington Mines are working very irregularly for want of shipping. Dunsmuir is blowing that he is getting $10 per ton retail.

With very best regards

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 402)

7 Dec 80

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your thrice welcome private letters of the 29th & 30th ultimo are before me. It pleases me greatly to find that you are selling coal to the trade at a really good figure. Old Dunsmuir and his satellites may rave, but I am sure you will get a share of the good trade unmindful of them. Your private intelligence, depend upon it is safe in my own breast. I well know the confidence the Directors have in yourself -- a subject the secretary has more than once alluded to in his Dispatches. Dunsmuir’s son-in law, Houghton, thought he could do a great deal through the influence of Mr. Irwin, who I think is a relative, and I believe it was at Houghton’s suggestion that Dunsmuir proposed to rent this Company’s property, and I heard, when last in Victoria, much to my surprise, that the manager of the Bank of British Columbia had said “he hoped Dunsmuir would get the Nanaimo Mines”. That gentleman has an eye to business. I have no doubt the Bank, one way and another, is doing well out of our opponents. We shall soon now, I suppose, hear something of Mr. Jeffcock’s report and learn how the proposition of Dunsmuir was received.

I don’t think Dunsmuir Diggle & Co. will get our men away from us unless they will pay them more than we do. It is well known to Bryden of, course, that we have one or two good mechanics, and (Page 403) is that class of our workmen which may possibly be tampered with. Bryden has very quickly taken to Wellington. He spends all his time but still talks of going East.

The ‘Hylton Castle’ is in port and I am told Mr. Richards came up in her. I have not seen him; so I expect he has made arrangements to load at Departure Bay. Perhaps you are right about Richards. He may be using a weekend party to bring about terms he wants to make with Dunsmuir and having gained his point he will be satisfied. I think Richards is rather slippery.

Very bad weather is now upon us. A drenching cold rain is coming down as I write, and we have to give extra time to get men to work outside. Everything is covered with snow too.

I see Goodall, Perkins & Co have brought the steamer ‘Ajax’. Newspapers report, however, that she is to be made a sailing ship. Would the ‘Thrasher’s’ rigging be any good for her?

Hoping you are well, and with very best regards.

Believe me, always

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

yours sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 405)

17 Dec 1880

PRIVATE

Nanaimo B. C.

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

You can hardly conceive my delight in reading that you had, to a considerable extent, thwarted the plans of our greedy opponents. They deserve no quarter at our hands, and I trust they may get well bitten by their speculation in outside coal.

I imagine from the cablegram I have today received from the Secretary that the Directors have decided upon sinking pits etc. They are inquiring about a right of way to which we are applying to our local Legislature for, and which I have no doubt will be granted. The right is to build a Railway in front of certain city property.

Hoping you are well and most heartily reciprocating your kind wishes

Believe me, very truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 405)

23 Dec 80

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Accept my best thanks for your private lines of the 15th and enclosure. I feel dreadfully [taken?] that D.D.& Co have not been able to rule your market as they no doubt would like to do. The insatiable greed of that crowd is something unheard of. I can hardly imagine what they are going to do with all the coal they now are shipping, and they are engaging every vessel they can.

There is only one way our opponents will be able to get our men from us- that is by giving them higher wages. This they are not likely to do. Bryden could put men in their way whenever he liked, but thank goodness he has not that opportunity now. Bryden seems quite at home at Wellington, and we do not, I am glad to relate, miss him at all here. Mr. Cooper is about to send his son to your city to try to get into a Machine shop. He has worked in our shops the last two or three years, and has always borne an excellent character. Mr. Cooper will feel very thankful if you could aid his boy should he refer to you.

All is going on smoothly.

With kindest regards

yours very truly

M. Bate.

(Page 406)

28th Dec 80

PRIVATE

My dear Mr. Rosenfeld

A thousand thanks for your private note of the 15th inst and enclosure. I have one official from Mr. Robins of the 20th ultimo pretty much to the same effect as yours. He says with regard to Mr. Jeffcock’s Report. Mr. Jeffcock has responded to the Board as to the condition of things at Nanaimo. In every department and the Directors have good reason to be reassured in regard to that department over which you have control. He says further on: “a person to take Mr. Bryden’s place will go out very shortly, and I trust (and I am sure you will join us in the wish) that hence forth our progress will be more satisfactory, and that the position of the Company will be regained” I hope a good Mine Engineer is coming. He is sure, I think, to call upon you and you will have a good opportunity perhaps of warning him against the wiles of our neighbors and their satellites. I shall (Page 407) be pleased if you will wire me when the gentleman leaves San Francisco.

If he goes to Victoria I will try and meet him there. You might, if you would kindly do so merely say “Leaves by ‘Idaho’ or ‘Dakota’ as the case may be.

I should be charmed to learn that our opponents were bit deeply by their Charters and Purchases, and I most earnestly hope you will “corner” them one of these days.

I had almost forgot to tell you, in my haste, that Mr. Robins sent me a very nice private letter with his last official Dispatch. The tone of it is most cheering to me, and the language he uses bespeaks noble impulses in the man who penned it.

Sometime early next year I expect a marriage in the house. Sallie I think will leave us to join “heart and hands” with a young gentleman who lately arrived from England, and who I believe called on you in San Francisco, He is a worthy fellow as far as I have seen of him, and I have every confidence they will be happy.

Hoping Mrs. Rosenfeld, yourself and family are all in good health,

Believe me, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Always yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 408)

8th Jany 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind private notes of the 29th and 31st ultimo with enclosure, I was, as usual, exceedingly pleased to receive. I sent a Newspaper by Capt. Hayward which perhaps you will kindly look at in case the one before sent has not reached you. The Directors are sure to refer Mr. Richards to you, and I think he might have saved himself the trouble of getting his brother to see them. The ‘Hylton Castle’ is now at Departure Bay with quite a fleet of other vessels.

I have a letter from Mr. Jeffcock in which he says everything is satisfactory to the Directors and that he has recommended them to go ahead with new pits.

With very best wishes and thanks for your kind private lines.

I am, most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 409)

28th July 1881

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I was very busy yesterday morning, and had not time to acknowledge the receipt of your private notes of the 6th and 19th instant, for which please accept my warmest thanks.

Dunsmuir, the elder, a few days ago, told me that he is going to travel in the spring, and he intimated that he should, in a short time, take up a lengthy abode in your city - in fact be more there than here. He also hinted that he could afford to go around a little now, and he did not see why he should not enjoy himself. We had a chat about [-?] River Coal. He told me he had a letter from ‘Alick’ telling him that coal was better then he (Dunsmuir) had thought it to be, “yet” says Dunsmuir, “I can’t understand why Chandler wants to make a contract with me”. I shall try and meet the new Engineer after I receive your message. Bryden left the mine in a wretched condition. The coal is worked up against ‘faults’ on nearly all sides, and it will be a work of some period to cut through them.

As to charters, so long as contracts are filled, you will not care to pay high freights, I think unless selling price is correspondingly high. The copy of letter from Mr. Robins is most interesting. It is cheering to find the Directors are striking out boldly in the design of new works. I have no letters from Head Office later than 7th Dec. I dare say Mr. Robins is very busy about machinery etc. with the new Engineer.

With kindest regards

I am, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 410)

5 Mar 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have before me your kind private note of the 17th ultimo, for which I am obliged. Rumour has it here that Mr. Dunsmuir Sr. and Mr. Diggle are seriously disagreeing, on what grounds I was not informed. The old gentleman probably wants to get the mine entirely in the hands of his own family? I am just going into the mine and on my return I will wire you respecting the fire. It has been a terrible affair, and it seems almost miraculous that the flames could have been arrested in a place where nearly everything around is highly combustible.

You certainly did manage [with?] D & Co. first rate. They are not getting quite as much shipping as they did. My time lately has been greatly devoted to the mine, and I find the whole place is in a worse condition than I thought it was. The new works should be pushed on most energetically or we may be left without coal, before we reach it with new pits.

With kindest regards

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 411)

28th Mar 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have your kind private note of the 17th instant for which I beg to thank you. Mr. Beaumont is beginning to look up things about the mine, but he cannot at present say much as to what he might be able to do with it in the next few months, but as I have stated in my official letter, as soon as the water is out of the Lower Level say in two weeks, the production will improve. Mr. Beaumont has had great experience in opening new pits, and I have no doubt he will put things in good shape to start with in beginning a fresh mine.

I will advise you by Telegraph should there be any Change in our affairs. I am really sorry the ['Belvidere'?] going to South Wellington was a step in the wrong direction, but I almost thought you may approve of it, because it would enable us to load the 'Victoria' this trip, and your telegram of the 15th did not reach me until the 2nd day after the ‘Belvidere’ had left us.

The new married couple got Home all right. They had a pleasant trip on the 'Victoria' notwithstanding the large number on board. Can you not let some of your family come and see us this summer?

Mrs. Bate joins me in sending kind regards to Mrs. Rosenfeld and yourself and

Believe me, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 412)

16th April 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your private letter of the 8th inst, I duly received and beg to thank you for it.

We have the water off No 4 level, but we do not just yet see a way of

getting out more than 100 tons a day upon an average. As we get into fresh places, others are getting exhausted, and we are in this way narrowed down to the present small yield. We are proposing to ask the miners to arrange for taking assistants, and working their “stalls” in double shifts, but I do not know how we shall succeed. The object of this is to try to give you all the coal we can for the Gas Company. We have about 200/ton of [Next coal in slack?] I suppose it would not do to put a little of it into the cargo of the 'Victoria' or 'Belvidere'? As I have mentioned in my official letter, the Victoria Gas Company use our nut coal exclusively.

Mr. Beaumont is having a Bore put down almost close to the loading wharf, say between the weigh house and the pier, and in the event of a good seam being found, he favours sinking at this spot, and thereby save all transportation of the coal by rail. It will take some little time to overcome our present cramped position, but I have no doubt we shall ultimately succeed.

Mr. & Mrs. Goepel ask to be most kindly remembered to you and Mrs. Rosenfeld and your family and please accept the best wishes of Mrs. Bate, and of

Yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 413)

6th May 1881

Nanaimo, B. C.

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am much obliged for your private lines of the 23rd ultimo.

Since I wrote to you about bad coal, we have disposed of a cargo to one of our old customers, Capt. Carr, who has been lately been dealing with our opponents, and I hear the Victoria Gas Company are wanting a supply. I therefore anticipate that we shall get rid of our whole stock.

The condition the new Douglas Mine has been in was as disappointing to me, as it would no doubt be perplexing to you. Faults, of course, we can not help. I thought we had and should have had according to the Mine plan, a large quantity of coal in pillars which I had proposed we should take out when our works were so much restricted by the unfortunate fire. Our present [out?] look however is much more promising than it has been and I trust we shall go forward rather than otherwise the next month or two.

No information has reached me from the Home office respecting the coal bought of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. and I am sure had you not seen a meeting for it, you would not have made the purchase. I am also sure you would have been better pleased could we have supplied all the coal your contracts called for.

I hardly can estimate how much coal we shall be able to give for the balance of this year. Mr. Beaumont is of opinion we can fully keep the ‘Belvidere’ and ‘Victoria’ going, and we will try to do more. I have mentioned in my official letter that we have good coal beyond the fault, which has hampered us for months past. Today, the seam is found 10 feet thick. If it continues we shall soon open out new ground for miners.

With very best regards to Mrs. Rosenfeld and yourself in which Mrs. Bate, Mr. & Mrs. Gospel join me.

I remain

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Sincerely yours

M. Bate.

(Page 414)

23rd May 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld.

I was sorry to learn by your kind favor of the 13th inst that you had to bear complaints respecting the coal last sent to you. Part of the New Douglas Seam, near the faults, is unfortunately rather tender, and although it burns very well, it makes more dross than the harder coal, as might be expected, I hope as we get away from the fault we lately passed that the coal will be found more firm and give more general satisfaction. Since I wrote my official letter of this morning, Mr. Beaufort informs me it is doubtful if we can quite complete the ‘Victoria’ tonight. Tomorrow (being the Queen’s Birthday) our men cannot be induced to remain at work. They are preparing for a general holiday, and much to our chagrin are preparing for their festivities a little too soon. We are unable to hold them, however, and here they do pretty well as they please. Mr. Beaumont speaks quite helpfully of the prospects of the mine. I think he intends to visit San Francisco by the next trip of the ‘Victoria’. He is expecting to meet his wife in your city.

Like myself he is very anxious to commence the new shaft, and perhaps a start will be made before he leaves for San Francisco.

Hoping yourself and family are in the enjoyment of good health, and with best regards to you all, in which the whole of my family join me.

Believe me, always

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

P. S. I almost forgot to mention that Capt. Hayward has intimated to me that Dunsmuir the elder wants the ‘Victoria’ to go along side the city wharf in which he (Dunsmuir), is interested to discharge her inward freight. If she ever goes to either of the city wharves with freight, I hope it will be Hirst's. He has expended large sums of money, buying and improving property we sold to him and deserves all the encouragement and support our friend can give him.

M. B.

(Page 416)

9th June 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

When writing to you privately on the 23rd. ultimo I hardly mentioned the wharf matter at the suggestion of others, and after a talk with Capt. Hayward, I was sorry afterwards that I troubled you at all about it. Its none of our business particularly, but I have always had a friendly feeling towards Mr. Hirst, whose wharf is free to our Company at all times -- that is, he never charges us any wharfage. Capt. Hayward has explained to Mr. Hirst that he, of course, has to go where he is ordered.

I am like yourself greatly hurt about the complaints made to you respecting the uncleanliness of our coal. It is mostly due to the bad design of our old and first bunkers, which I have said must not be filled again until we have double screen gratings fixed in there. This will be done at once, and I think we shall soon see the benefit of the change.

Hoping you are quite well, and with very best wishes

I remain yours sincerely

M. Bate.

(Page 417)

25th June 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I have to thank you very much for your kind private lines of the 17th instant. I hardly know what to think about the last cargo of coal on the ‘Victoria’. I was so very anxious to avoid complaint, and to save you the unpleasantness of hearing any dissatisfaction expressed, that I gave particular orders to Mr. Cooper to see that special care was taken in the loading and screening. That part of the cargo which I saw put in the cars looked very well, but however “boulders” could have got mixed with the coal is a mystery to me. Please let Mr. Beaumont know the whole difficulty in the matter.

Laying aside, for a moment, the very disagreeable duty of referring to complaints, I am overjoyed almost to find that you have so much consideration for the Company and its present unfortunate position. That your arrangements with the Directors for the future management of their business at your end is highly satisfactory to them. I feel sure, and as for myself, I trust your cordial relations with the company will never cease, while life lasts.

Mrs. Bate wishes to be kindly remembered to Mrs. Rosenfeld and yourself, and please accept best wishes of

yours very sincerely

M. Bate.

(Page 418)

1st Sept 81

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I will, as you wish, see that Capt. Erskine enjoys himself during his short stay here. It is about four years ago since he last visited us, when Capt. Gisbourne, if I remember rightly, and his lady were passengers, and we had a quiet drive into the country. Capt. Erskine I knew 13 years ago as commander of the ‘Constantine’, then carrying the mail to Seattle.

I am cheered that you were generally pleased with the ‘Victoria’s’ last cargo. Some of the stones which were found among the coal could hardly get there without the knowledge of the miners, and we have threatened to discharge any and every one who is found to send out an improper article.

It is said young Dunsmuir came up on the last trip of the “[Hylton?] Castle” to advise his father to close the mines for a month or two because he could not sell the coal. The combination of some of the dealers has been a wonderful help to our (Page 419) neighbours. Were it not for that they would fare pretty badly just now. We continue to produce Fitzwilliam coal- have now 3000 tons out, which we may probably increase to 5000 tons unless ordered otherwise.

I hope yourself and family are all well, as we all are, and with kindest regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

Believe me, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

most truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 420)

17 Sept 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld..

Your kind private letter of the 9th inst is before me, as also [a] copy of your letter to Mr. Robins of same date. Mr. Beaumont has been negotiating with Sabiston & Horne with a view of “bonding” their coal land for some 18 months, and in the meantime it was intended to well explore our own ground adjacent to that of Messrs S&H; but while Mr. Beaumont is arranging terms, Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co offer $30,000.00 cash! Which put an end to the bonding. It is strange how young Dunsmuir could have learned so soon what Mr. Beaumont was after, as he hoped to get things settled before the move he was making became generally known.

Your suggestion with regard to steamers as colliers is a capital one; but as so much money will be required for new works the next year I hardly know if the Directors (Page 421) would care to call upon the shareholders to purchase, though probably they might. In any case, I suppose they could charter on terms as favourable as D.D.& Co. hold 'Barnard Castle' and 'Hylton Castle'. In course of time, there is no doubt steamers will carry your grains away and such change will have a very desirable effect on our business as it will in great measure tend to stop the importation of Australian and English coal to your port. Do you not think so? In those days, sailing ships will be cheap. The opening of the Panama Canal in a few years time will work wonders on this coast.

Has anything more been said about buying or selling the Company’s property? I see you refer to the matter under the head of “steam colliers”.

I have explained in my official letters that our miners are making a demand which Mr. Beaumont believes we should strenuously resist, and I am afraid it will lead to a strike. I am very much adverse to strikes and hope we may ,by reasoning with the men, get them to continue working. Having already been idle three days, they will probably take a further rest.

With very kind regards to yourself and family

I am, my Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

most truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 422)

4th. October 1881

PRIVATE

Nanaimo BC.

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I will without delay ask the American Consul to furnish Invoice Certificates as you wish. Mr. Francis is very accommodating and he will no doubt favor us when matters are explained to him.

The fact is we did not want to buy Sabiston and Horne’s mineral rights and Dunsmuir Diggle & Co according to my estimates have paid “too much for the whistle “ If the Bond had been executed we could probably have traced the seam from Sabiston and Horne’s place to our ground not far away.

We have no carbonate for the Diamond Drill or we should now be exploring at the Wellington seam. This coming winter and next spring we shall make a vigorous effort to find it, and I [am] in great hopes we shall succeed.

I quite understand your telegram. It does not much (Page 423)

matter if the number is added or deducted.

Our men are not making any move for work. Before long a number of them will be leaving the place I expect and it will be a good job for us if a number of them go. There are some very bad fellows among them.

If there is anything in the way of the 'Victoria' loading at Departure next trip, and you should want us to give her a cargo at Fitzwilliam mine kindly telegraph. You will, have no doubt, understood that we want to keep the Island miners going, and if the steamer coals there, the Nanaimo men may prevail upon the others to quit work.

I think with regard to steamers the Directors would carry out any recommendation of yours. If those steamers now on the way to your port are good colliers you may bid [bid/hit?] upon one that the Company may negotiate for.

With very best wishes to yourself and family, in which Mrs. Bate unites

I remain, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

yours most truly

M. Bate.

(Page 424)

21st. Oct 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind private letter of the 12th instant, and its enclosure, I have perused with great interest. The tone of all my communications from Head Office leads me to believe that the Directors will not stop short of a thorough development of the extensive property I am now personally [after? often?] examining the country, West of our present workings towards Wellington, and I have quite lately found indications which will justify a vigorous search, in the Spring for the Wellington seams. We may perhaps bore during the winter; and my plan is to make an exploration by sinking a small pit, so that we see exactly our ground, know what is, and govern ourselves accordingly. Sinking, however, in the locality I refer to can not be undertaken during the winter season.

In my last official letter I referred to the fact of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. employing our (Page 425) men, much, of course to our prejudice. When we once we get clear of them, that is, when you have got all the coal you agreed to take from them. I should be heartily pleased if the “ring” they are into could be broken up by a few thousand tons of Fitzwilliam Coal among the dealers who are free. They, (D.D.& Co.), do not scruple to use every endeavor to embarrass us, and I should feel glad to see them get a requital. Dunsmuir Sen. talks a good deal, and is as deceitful and as designing as ever. He requires very careful watching.

I am in hopes we shall shortly get men to work at Chase River Mine, and many of the miners who are willing to go back as they stopped, will not be discouraged. We have shown no anxiety to resume operations and have not said a word on the subject; because we did not propose any alterations to give the men grounds to “strike”. They wanted to make changes which we could not agree to. Your very acceptable advice shall not be forgotten. We not only need to keep our customers, but obtain new ones after a while.

Please accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate and myself, for yourself & Mrs. Rosenfeld and believe me

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld always most truly yours

M. Bate.

(Page 426)

6th Dec. 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld.

Since I addressed you officially on the 2nd inst, our well disposed men continue to enquire about work and a general resumption is speedily looked for.

I have just been informed that Capt. Spalding of our town takes passage by the 'Barnard Castle' for your city. He is invited, I understand, to spend a few weeks with Mr. Diggle. Spalding has always been a great friend of our opponents, and he did all he could to prevent our “Nanaimo Railway Bill” passing the legislature. We, however, succeeded in getting the Bill through the local house. I don’t know that the Captain has any special mission to carry out in visiting San Francisco, but it occurs to me you will very likely meet with him, and perhaps you will be good enough to watch him -- draw him out (Page 427)

a little if opportunity arises. He is rather a garrulous old gentleman, and I dare say will find something to speak about, should you get into conversation with him.

We have a tremendous “Bill” to settle with Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. for the manner in which they have done their best to embarrass us during our trouble with the miners. Not only have they employed our “strikers” but they have actually endeavoured to entice away our men from the new shaft by offering them increased wages etc!

Newspapers report that the Pacific Coast Steamship Co. have sold out to the Oregon Improvement Company. If correct, the reports will doubtless soon be confirmed.

With very best regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me

I remain

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 428)

8th. Dec. 81

PRIVATE

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Ever since I penned my last few private lines to you on the 6th inst, I have been thinking how the sale of a controlling interest in the Pacific Coast Steamship Company may affect you, and with you, our Company; and I greatly regret to find by your kind private letter of the 28th ultimo that you have strong reasons to complain of the transfer, and that the consequence is alike injurious and unsatisfactory to you.

I hope you may not be a heavy loser by the disposal of the Stock? Respecting your future plans please rest assured I will not divulge a word. Capt. Hayward may possibly talk to me on the subject of the sale and I will note particularly what he says. With reference to steamers, English vessels could be obtained either (page 429) by purchase or charter at very low rates, and would not some of our people, Mr. Fitzwilliam and others, join you in running one or two good boats? The ‘Barnard Castle’ seems to be a capital vessel and is supposed to be making money both for her owners and Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co.

You will be pleased to know that the miners are giving up the struggle for increased pay, and, as I have mentioned in my official letter of this date, all the men we need are ready for work. We can set the mine in full operation again as soon as you deem it advisable we should do so.

Trusting you will see a way of “getting even” with the parties who have unfairly acted in the sale of Pacific C. S. Co. stock.

I remain

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 430)

6th Jan'y 82

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind private letters of the 16th and 19th inst were received with many thanks.

As regards steamer business future carriage of coal etc., your intimate and thorough knowledge of what the coal trade requires will without doubt lead you to take the proper course, and at the proper time. Perhaps, after all, you may make numerous sales of coal to the Pacific Coal Steamship Company.

I am glad to hear you met Capt. Spalding who is considered here a great “gas pipe” “blow hard” etc. He very likely does not wish me well, only because I happen to have been opposed to him and one or two of his friends politically, and because he was prevented, by myself, from defeating through his lawyers our Railway (Page 431) Bill. Had he succeeded we could not have sunk the shaft in the place which Mr. Jeffcock selected. Our Company has not a greater enemy than Capt. Spalding: that is well known. Mr. Beaumont’s engagement is for 3 years; but I question if he will leave the Company at the expiration of his agreement. Capt. Spalding’s prediction, as to the time it will take to sink the shaft, will I hope be far astray. In six months over one third of the distance has been sunk- head gear, Engines and Boilers erected, and as to our men not working for us unless we pay them more wages, you will be pleased to hear that they are, with few exceptions, working for less than they did before the strike. Capt. Spalding likes to talk; but his opinion is not worth much.

The shaft is down about 220 ft. and the sinkers are proceeding uninterruptedly. We have had fearful weather while the 'Victoria' has been loading, raining almost nightly until today.

Mrs. Bate asks to be kindly remembered to you and Mrs. Rosenfeld and joins with me in wishing you all a ‘Happy and Prosperous New Year’.

Believe me Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate.

(Page 432)

21st April 82

My dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Many thanks for your private note of the 10th instant. You will be pleased to know that I say very little to Capt. Plummer in a general way. I soon discovered what you perhaps have known long ago, that he is rather a talkative gentleman.

In connection with the advertisement you were good enough to send me. “Superintendent wanted.” – it is reported that some party in your [Org?] is about to reopen the Harewood Coal Mine, and it may be for that place that a superintendent is wanted.

Dunsmuir’s Railway Bill has been defeated in our Local Legislature, and at present Standard, Crocker & Co. are not likely to obtain a franchise to build a Railway from Esquimalt to Nanaimo.

The 'Victoria’s' present cargo Mr. Beaumont mentions is not as coarse as former ones which were taken from the face of the mine.

With very kind regards to yourself and family in which Mrs. Bate joins

Believe me Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 433)

10th May 82

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Your kind private lines of the 29th ult. are before me. I think I mentioned before that Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co were proposing to build or buy a steamer. I hardly see that they can do much better in their carrying business than they are now doing with the “Barnard Castle” and “Hylton Castle”.

The “News Letter” of your City I see is puffing the Harewood property, pretty highly -- in fact it very greatly misrepresents matters and is likely to mislead the unwary, as far as one can see of the Harewood Coal mine it is worth nothing at these times as a mine.

I was sorry to hear such a bad account of the Fitzwilliam Coal. The present cargo of the 'Victoria' you will find much better than the previous one.

With very best regards, in which Mrs. Bate and Mrs. Goepel, who is spending a week with us joins me.

I am, Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 434)

6th July 82

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I am very sorry to learn by your private note of the 27th ultimo that Mrs. Rosenfeld is very ill and both Mrs. Bate and myself sincerely hope you will soon hear of her recovery.

The 'Victoria' this trip was loaded very slowly but, as you will learn, not through any fault of ours. Vessels are being greatly detained at Departure Bay. We will always do our best to give good dispatch, which is, I know, alike pleasing to you, to shipmasters and owners. I hope the day is not far distant when we shall be able, if so disposed, to go after our enemies.

I beg to thank you for the copy of Mr. Robins letter, and if I am not able to I should (FAINT WRITING) be pleased [--] favoured with further copies for some little time.

Mr. Beaumont is quite anxious to begin making the Railway to Southfield that we can, in a few months, get the coal to this wharf. But the Directors, no doubt wisely, wish us to first further examine the coal. When writing to the Board on the 28th ultimo, I asked if they would in the event of the new place being opened up extensively, please give the new mine a name. How could it do to call it “Cumberland” or “[Hartley?]”. Or can you kindly suggest something better?

Mrs. Bate joins me in kind remembrance to yourself and family, and believe me

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 435)

6th Feby 83

My Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

I beg to thank you for your private lines of the 18th ultimo. And for the enclosure, which I was glad to receive -all papers of the kind are very welcome.

I am downhearted to think that we are in such a fix with water, and I hope we can obtain a good pump of sufficient capacity at your City, or from New York within the present month.

You will learn perhaps that the Directors are sending out Rails for the South field line. The prospect at this new opening has not been encouraging lately. The coal is thin and tender- though it burns well.

There was a threatened strike at Wellington, but the men did not give over work.

Coal is struck in the East Wellington I heard [-] shaft. At first the seam did not look very well; but it is improving, I believe as the miners drift into it.

Our Diamond Boring Machine has been standing some time as we have no carbonate. We expect a supply shortly when our [--] for the Wellington coal will be continued.

Mrs. Bate asks to be kindly remembered to Mrs. Rosenfeld, your good self and family. Hoping you are all well, in which I join.

Very sincerely yours

Dear Mr. Rosenfeld

M. Bate

Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Company fonds

Series 1. Administrative records

FILE TITLE: Letter Book, 14 March 1873 - 14 July 1883

14 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Wild

I am favored with your kind letter of the 1st Feb’y and will not fail to give its contents due attention. I did not fail to notice the large amount of cash assets appearing in the last Balance sheet, and I think that a most reassuring feature in all such papers.

You are aware that I have for a long time believed it would be to the interest of the Company to get a hold, the best obtainable in the Comox field, but it is more than probable we are now too late. Some Gentlemen at San Francisco are in association with the Union Company, whose claim I think most of, and I hardly know if it would be wise to make any proposition while negotiations with other parties are pending. I think perhaps I might acquire the shares of one or two of our workmen, but I doubt very much if they will just now submit any proposal to us to take over (Page 2) the whole concern. You will perceive by the Mineral Amendment Ordinance, which I forward in my official letter today, Clause 5, that any prospecting License issued under the former Act is transferable. This will give the Hon[ourable] Dr. Ash an opportunity to get rid of his Beaufort coal lands. Baynes Sound, it is understood out here, is disposed of by Mr. Pemberton who I think is in London. In the course of a week or two, I shall know if anything can be done with the Union Shareholders.

You will greatly regret to learn of the fresh run of water into the mine. It will throw us back considerably. If we can keep the passage open till dry weather, we shall soon get over the difficulty. The pumps can take out all the extra water thrown into the works from the swamp so long as it goes in gradually. If a large body accumulates and breaks in with a rush, we shall be kept in trouble for a lengthy period. Everything possible will be done to keep the swamp dry and if we can succeed in this, three weeks, I believe will see the mine levels drained again.

Hoping you are well and with kind remembrances

I remain

Yours very Sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 3)

15 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

In acknowledging the receipt of your kind favor of the 6th inst, I am pleased to say that instead of having 4 feet of clean coal at the new seam we have over 5 1/2 feet. Everything connected with the seam is favourable for working.

I thought the new seam Coal was taking well in Victoria for House purposes. Broderick & Co order more of the new than the old, but last month they did not get a single pound from us for retail in Victoria--only a few tons were taken for the use of the 'Emma', and I am not aware that they received any coal from the Wellington mine excepting for the navy. It is a query how they supply their customers! They surely can't have many.

You would be sorry to hear of the new influx of water in the mine. As far as can be ascertained, there is no additional damage done, nor do I think the roads we had partly cleared will be covered up again. The pumps are going steadily and I am glad to say are beating the water down. Extremely wet weather is keeping everything in arrears.

! did not fail to impress upon the men at Newcastle the absolute necessity of well cleaning the coals for the 'Prince Alfred'. Will you kindly let us know if there is any complaint of slate being found in the coal? If it is not well cleaned, the best thing we can do is to take the loading out of the hands of the Contractors and get our usual outside hands to do the work whenever they are available.

We are very sorry to hear that Mr. Bermingham has not been very well of late. Emily said she would rather you could letter [sic] us you were all well then she would receive her pictures. Her Grandmother in England is so delighted with her photograph that she has sent quite a requisition for them for our friends.

I get a copy of the Commercial Herald by every trip of the 'Prince Alfred'. If you have to purchase a copy for me, I want to pay for it, because it seems an expensive paper.

Emily sends her best love to Mrs. Bermingham and the children and accept for yourself the best wishes of us all.

from Yours very truly

M. Bate

P.S. I have omitted to mention that we have another addition to our family- a daughter.

(Page 5)

27 Mar 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

As you may suppose I was much pleased to learn by yours of the 20th inst. that the 'Prince Alfred' got along very well in her first voyage with the Newcastle Coal, and I hope similar ref. will continue to be given by your Engineer. I will [try?] my utmost to see the Coal is well cleaned, and then I believe it will go well. Years ago, it had a better reputation for steamers than the Douglas. In about three months, we shall prepare to get further to the dip of the Newcastle seam, and probably, as we go down, there will be less slate and shale between the coal.

I hear Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are in want of cash. Probably that is why they are so anxious to send coal away to San Francisco. They have shipped none to Victoria the past month that I know of so that (Page 6) all they get I suppose will go to Bickard. The ‘Dominga' is now at Wellington mine loading for your market. Bickard has more than once reported to me as unsafe. Quite later, I hear the contract with the Wellington Co is not in his name, but in that of Welch, Rithet & Co.

The last time Capt. Bailey was here with the ['Lurline’?], he told me our coal had heated in the steamer’s bunkers. On enquiry into the matter, I found the coal was taken in here on the 7th of Feb’y, very wet with snow, and stored pretty close to the boiler - a situation and condition highly conducive to firing. I know the Douglas Coal is very quick of action. A lucifer match would almost set it going and being placed near a hot boiler when very wet it would certainly have every incentive to spontaneous combustion. This is the first case, where under any circumstance, I have ever heard of our coal heating up this way.

The 'King Philip' got here this morning towed up by the 'Cyrus Walker’. The ['James Cheston’?] and [‘Powkattain' ?] did not get away until the 23rd- waiting several days for a steamer. The 'Cheston' was towed on a sand bank in the harbour which detained her another day.

Many thanks to you for sending Emily's photographs. Please let me have bill for cost of them.

On the 21st inst., I wrote to Mr. Rosenfeld intimating that it would be well if it could be done to keep the 'Arkwright' away. If she has to come, of course we shall do our best to load her, but I fear she would be detained during next month. I trust I shall be able to report more encouragingly of our output.

[Receive?] Emily and Mrs. Bate's kind regards and their best wishes.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 7)

4 April 73

My Dear Mother

Your letter dated 20th Jan’y I duly received through David Botham, and I was very much pained to hear from you how very unwell you have been, but relieved a little when I read that part of your letter which stated that your health was improving. I know, my dear Mother, that it must be uphill work to get along comfortably as things are now at home, and I pray that you may be blest with strength to bear any privations to which you may be subjected. I shall enclose in this half a sovereign, and about two weeks after you receive that, you may expect something more substantial. It would grieve me sorely to know that you suffered from anything I can provide. Thank God I am in a position to take care of you as far as money can do it, but what I send you I certainly hope will be applied in a proper way. I mean to keep you comfortable at your House. Get all the clothing you need and all that is necessary to eat and drink. It does me good to hear from you that father-in-law is steady and I trust he will continue in that course. If we are spared, we shall all see each other again before long.

I am very sorry to hear of my (Page 8) cousin Joseph Robinson being hurt so badly. I sincerely hope that he is not so seriously injured as you think he is. If he is getting better, please let me know and say if he is in want of anything. Tell him also how sorry I am to hear of his misfortune and to give my kind love to him. I shall indeed be glad to get a portrait of my Uncle and other Niece and trust I shall get both it and a note soon. Tell him I say you must bother him until he sends them. You forgot to tell me what you thought of Emily's Photograph. I send you one now of Elizabeth's husband. He was here a few days ago and they all desire me to convey their best love to you. I have never had a letter from Ann, which you inform me she wrote last June. If she sent one it has miscarried, which is quite an unusual thing. Since I last wrote to you, we have another addition to our family. A girl whom we call Elizabeth after you. All of us are pretty well. Emily, Mark, and Sarah Anne are growing up fast. Thomas and George are also getting fine boys. Lucy is a little darling, as you will see by her picture which I send you herewith. Sarah Anne wants to get one of my photographs that was taken some 12 or 13 years ago. If you have one, dear Mother, would you please forward it to us. Sarah Anne wants to have a painting made from it. Sarah Anne desires me to [send her best love?]

Dear Mother makes a similar request.

Remember us to all our Uncles Aunts and Cousins and oblige

Your affectionate Son

Mark.

(Page 9)

9 April 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I last evening received your favour of the 25th ultimo and telegram of the 5th. The latter read "I did not "go up Alfred will go out Nanaimo" By which I infer you are not coming on the 'Prince Alfred' and that the steamer is not coming to Nanaimo. I regret to have to state that by tomorrow night All our Coal and dross will be cleared away. Since I wrote to Mr. Rosenfeld this morning, the 'California' has arrived for a full cargo of Coal for the Portland Gas Co. and 120 tons shale for own use. I propose giving the 'California' 50 or 60 tons of large Coal which will enable the Gas Co. to get along for a month or so. By that time, our position will be greatly improved.

The main difficulty about the 'Arkwright' away will be the detention she may meet with, of course if she makes a longer passage than is calculated on, we might give her better dispatch than we supposed. I am thinking….

(Page 10) perhaps Capt. Daly would go to the new mines to fill up, but I hardly know if I should be doing right in furnishing Coal without instructions.

Owing to heavy rains, we have had a terrible job with water. Happily, the machinery goes well and our great difficulty is now well nigh over.

I will write again soon and in the meantime we shall do everything possible to push work ahead.

I need scarcely say how glad I shall be to see you up here.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 11)

5th May 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I duly received your kind favour of the 5th and 19th ultimo, but in the expectation of seeing you by the last trip of the 'Prince Alfred' I did not write in acknowledgment of the former.

I am much concerned to hear of the complaint respecting the Newcastle Coal and earnestly hope that better reports will be given of it in future, A cargo taken from the Newcastle mine this month has cleared away the heap, much to my surprise, and I find, on examining the returns handed in by the contractor, that he is several hundred tons short, and my friend Bryden has been astray at least 300 tons in his estimate of the coal heaped outside. We shall have to make a change at once in the working of the Newcastle Coal, and get further to the deep of the seams. In the meantime, while there is no Newcastle out, we shall have to ship the new Douglas for the 'Prince Alfred'.

Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co are getting to the wharf about 50 tons of coal a day. The 'Wellington' and 'Shooting Star' both got into Departure Bay the same

(Page 12) day. The former is not yet fitted up while the latter was loaded at the new mine on the morning of the 2nd and sailed yesterday with a fine fair wind down the Gulf. The 'Wellington' I think takes about 800 tons. The 'Constitution' arrived at the Wellington mine yesterday, for another cargo for Bickard, and Dunsmuir tells me he looks for some other small craft and that he has about 900 tons of coal at the Bay.

I am glad to say the old Douglas mine is drained once more. The water is lower than it has been the last year but we don’t get out coal enough. The average for this month, according to Mr. Bryden's estimate, is to be 100 tons per diem. I fear, however, that the output will fall short of this.

The 'Arkwright' has on board 700 tons, and has a prospect of getting coal just about as fast it will be stored away. Some of this crew have got into difficulty for selling whiskey to Indians, and I believe 4 or 6 have been sent to the chain gang in Victoria. And owing to the shortness of his crew, Capt. Harris seems disinclined to have his ship taken to the new mine,

I look for your arrival by the next trip of the 'Prince Alfred' and need scarcely repeat how pleased I shall be to see you.

Accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate, Emily and of [?]

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 13)

3 May, 73

My Dear Mother

I wrote to you some three weeks ago, sending half a sovereign, and telling you that you may expect something more substantial in the course of a week or two. I now enclose a Bill of Exchange for 5 Pounds which is money sent to me by Elizabeth and her husband for you. As soon as you get it, write to me, dear Mother, if only a very short note. Also write to Elizabeth and her husband thanking them for their great goodness. Mr. Horne was here a week or two ago and all of the family were well. I hear from him nearly every week and I am always requested to give their best love to you.

I had a letter from Thomas Hughes the other day, which I was much pleased to receive. I shall write to him soon and if you should see him please tell him so, at the same time kindly remember me to him. I have also just got a letter from my dear sister Anne. I need hardly tell you the good it has done me to get a few lines from her. She tells me you showed her my Mark photo when she was at Holly Hall and that it reminded her of (Page 14) me when I was about his age. A great many people think that one painting of myself is intended for him. He is growing very fast and he is really a robust looking boy. On the 16th of this month, he will be 13 years old.

You will be glad to hear that our little one is quite well. Elizabeth seems quite proud that we have named the baby after you and her Lucy is here two or three times every week and Sarah Anne is frequently urging her to write to you and she promises to do so. Is there any little cottage property that you know of near to you that I could buy, I mean a patch of ground with a cottage or [small?] House upon it. I suppose you still live in the same place as you did when I left Home?

Have you seen my Uncle George since he returned to England? He would be able to tell you all about myself and the rest of us. Aunt Marie talks of going Home before long. I have sent papers to my cousin William Bate lately and I hope he gets them. Please remember me to him and ask him to write a few lines to me. Also give our kind love to my Uncle and Aunt Ranger and to Uncle John [Neals?] and Uncle Thomas Bryant, Aunt Eleanor and all other relatives, all of whom I often think of.

Emily and Mark and Sally and perhaps Tommy too will be writing to you one of these days so that you can see what the little folks have to say for themselves.

Sarah Anne sends her best love to you and father-in-law.

And accept the same Dear Mother from your ever affectionate Son

Mark.

(Page 15)

22 May 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your telegram of the 17th reached me on the 19th. With regard to giving a supply of fuel to the 'Prince Alfred' I may state that we have not just now either coal or dross in stock on this side, and we have the 'James Cheston' at the Island. The 'Arkwright' sailed yesterday with 1885 tons and we have the 'Black Diamond' and 'Emma' loading for the 'Prince' with old Douglas Coal today.

Tomorrow, if nothing comes along, we shall begin to accumulate - Saturday the 24th will be a holiday, and by the following Monday 26th I look for the 'California' from Sitka. She will (Page 16) require, I suppose, about 200 tons.

You will thus see exactly how we are fixed. Should the 'California' not arrive as expected, we shall be able to give the 'Prince Albert' by Monday night somewhere about 2000 tons but I think it is very probable the 'California' will be here by the time stated. After Monday night, say the 'California' arrived in the meantime, we shall be turning out fully [300?] tons per day. You will hardly, however, feel like bringing the 'Prince' up here without knowing fuel is obtainable - unless you want to beach her. At all events, I shall look for you no later than Tuesday. Mr. Bell doubtless will wish to get as early as possible to this place; you might perhaps get [?] to come up if you are ready to start the day before the 'Douglas' sails?

Kindly hand the enclosed letter to Mr. Bell.

I have room for you both at my house and with best wishes believe me.

Yours very truly

M Bate

(Page 17)

11 June 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind letter of the 4th written in 'Olympia' came to hand last evening. [Brodrister's?] charge for the use of the 'Emma' is very reasonable. We have to thank for your good offices in the matter. I have been stiff and sore since we returned from Comox, and I don't know when I'm going to get right again. I hope Mr. Bell will be quite himself ere he reaches San Francisco. If he had not taken his departure before this got into your hands, please inform him that up to last evening, there was no change reported in the Newcastle Douglas Slope- Very little headway, however, has been made in the sinking since he left. In the old Newcastle Slope, a much improved face of coal is presented set in the (Page 18) main slope of the Douglas pit the deepening of which had just commenced when Mr. Bell was here, we had a splendid clean piece of coal 7 feet thick- without a band or parting of any kind. As regards the work generally, everything seems to be going along in the usual steady way. No sign of the 'Atlanta' yet. I begin to think she is not coming to us for the present. If she has gone to the [Mills?] ,of course, we can take some other craft soon after the ['Leister'?] is loaded - say by the 18th or 19th.

Next week the Engines at the Islands I trust will pull out considerable coal. We are to do big things here between this and the end of the month.

Remember me kindly to Mr. Bell and please ask him to accept kind regards of Mrs. Bate and Emily and the same please accept yourself.

from yours very truly

M Bate

(Page 19)

10 June 73

Dear Mr. Wild

Your kind favour of the 2nd of May I received last week. I am extremely obliged to you for giving your attention of the purchase of shares in the Company's stock on my account.

Perhaps a knowledge of the flood in the mine may have the effect of bringing down the premiums after the General Meeting, but I am satisfied whether that result is brought about or not. Shares will be as valuable henceforward as they have been hitherto.

I am much interested with the particulars you were good enough to give referring to negotiations about the Harewood property. It would be quite safe to say that none of the Douglas pit coal will run under Harewood. A tracing of the mine plan carried away by Mr. Bell will show that the [?], if it continues the same course as where stopped, will go under the Bay before Chase River is reached, giving a fine piece of coal to the [rise? river?]. I am unable to state what area of Douglas Coal may be found on the Harewood Estate. (I don't think it can be much if any) but there is no doubt a considerable extent of the under seam, some 40 acres of which it is said might be worked level free. 6000 pounds seems a large sum for the Harewood property, especially when it is borne in mind that, as far as is known, not one third of the Estate is coal bearing. My idea is that all (Page 20) the Company need care about obtaining from Lord George Hamilton is that portion of his property bounded by the Company's South line, starting from Chase River- thence, from the extremity of said line running next to the North and South line of Cranberry District altogether nearly 3000 acres. There has no coal been found on any other part of the Harewood property. It would be far better I think to give 2000 pounds for 3000 acres in the locality indicated than 5000 pounds for the whole Estate. Mr. Bell will probably have something to tell you relative to his peep at Harewood.

The break at the swamp has been a most vexatious affair- the more so because the plan of the mine was far in arrears, and we would seem to have been groping in the dark. We had Landale for some two weeks before Mr. Bell's arrival, making a new plan etc but it was incomplete when wanted. I fear Mr. Bell would form a poor opinion of our surveys etc. mainly because the works were not systematically laid on paper. He did not hesitate to tell me, after he had looked into things a little, that we wanted a man to attend to the surveying etc. He was quick to perceive our wants in every direction and [appears?] thoroughly well posted in all branches of Coal mining. My earnest hopes are that his visit here, although a short one, will be beneficial to the Company in some way.

I shall hear very soon if we can do anything with the Union Co. Comox. I have seen nothing in the country to equal the outcrops on their claim. Baynes Sound is a better place for shipping, I think then Port Augusta into which the Union Co. Railway will run.

It is generally supposed that Coal under Gabriola Island would be [-----]

(Page 21) deep. One or two holes were put down on the Northern end of the island 12 years ago, but no satisfactory indications were found. About 2000 acres are occupied by settlers, and at present I fear we could not get any privilege to explore from the Government. After the 21st of next month, coal lands will be for sale according to the "Mineral Ordinance Amendment Act".

Lieutenant Egerton. who was out here in HMS. Boxer. has taken an interest in Diggle’s mine, and it is he, so Spalding tells me, who has found [cash?] to buy Rails and a locomotive for the Road from the mine to Departure Bay. Locomotive and rails are expected about October. [Richert?], who takes the Wellington coal for the San Francisco market, has lately proposed to make a new contract with Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co on terms which will just suit them at the present time. He is to pay so much per ton for the coal as it is delivered to the heap near the wharf, and is to take it away as he wants it. The notion is suppose to keep a stock at the mine to run at instead of carrying it to San Francisco and putting it in a yard in storage. Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co will have the best of a bargain of [?]

I am sorry to say I still feel the effect about my chest of the cold from which I suffered so long. I shall soon be quite well I trust.

Mr. Bermingham, when here the other day, appeared very anxious about getting more coal. I inferred from the way he spoke, that they have a prospect of making larger sales for us. High freights tell heavily on our business.

With best wishes, I beg to remain

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 22)

11 June 73

Nicholas J. Jones Esq.

Savannah, Georgia

My Dear Sir,

I just drop you a line to say that an offer has been made to me of $1000 cash for your property on the Esplanade. Of course, it is for you to consider whether the sum named is better than $7.00 a month with repairs, Taxes etc. to be paid out of that. I promised to lay the offer before you at the earliest moment and to request a reply by return.

I am getting the House you lived in painted, whitewashed etc. and will send you an account of the expenditures as soon as the work is finished. Fiddick’s residence also requires rather extensive repairs. Rents for some will be absorbed in paying for the fixing up of the houses.

Hoping you are well, and with kind regards.

I remain

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 23)

1st July 73

Dear Mr. Wild

I have much pleasure in writing to acknowledge the receipt of your kind letter of 31st May and I thank you for your goodness in attending to the purchase of shares for me in the company's stock. I am sorry to give you trouble in the matter, for I feel sure your time must be pretty well occupied about more important business. I hardly supposed the shares would be so difficult to obtain. The fact of few being on the market, and those at a high figure is evidence that stockholders think well of their property. The transfer of two shares I enclose and beg again to return thanks to your great kindness.

Our old pit is yet in a bad state. It vexes me to see such a long list of persons engaged for our small turnout of coal. The deepening of B slope which was going on rapidly has been abruptly stopped by water getting in from the lodgment. If we could get down here to run another level we should have some prospect of raising more coal. We never ought to be dependent upon one level if we could get two. During the strike, it was decided, after much deliberation, to immediately set on to deepen B slope when work was resumed and the road was relaid in readiness for the job. My colleagues thought, however, soon after the miners came to terms, that the pitch level would take (Page 24) coal we proposed to raise by B slopes. I argued and endeavored to show that we could get the slope down and the coal to the rise of the pitch lifted long before we could expect [overwritten] under the most favourable circumstances to get near any part of it from the pitch, but nothing was done towards deepening the slope and a long time elapsed before the bottom of the pitch was got at, and we see where we are today. The clearing of lower level is a slow process. The second incline (from C slope) into which the No 1 level was lately penetrated cannot be approached by the lower level as the mud is not removed to that point and we have much farther to go before another incline of stall from which coal can be mined is opened out. In the meantime, all the force we can employ to advantage is kept at the [----?], but the road being blocked with it headway is very slowly made.

I have no doubt that from all sources we shall make a good showing for the half year ending December. There is nothing in the way of turning out coal at Fitzwilliam Mine if things are kept in order, and you will be glad to know that the Newcastle Coal is looking much cleaner. The Chase River Coal part of Douglas shaft has been improving. [overwritten] The miners needed a change of some kind from the appearance of the heading today. I hope something of greater value may be struck. I think we should do well to get a bore down and ascertain if anything workable is to be found under the Newcastle seam. We have never examined the [?] I refer to.

Things seem to be moving along lately at the Wellington mine. I am told they are getting to their wharf daily 65 tons and for all they ship to San Francisco they are paid into the bank in Victoria. I hear 5.50 per ton. Then the heavy supply for which cash is paid on delivery. [blurring] They have entirely to themselves. In this connection, I am reminded that some time ago, in one of the Head Offices Dispatches, allusion was made to a Rear Admiral, a shareholder of this Company, who enquired if we could not furnish ships with fresh water at the wharf here. I should like to see the Admiral on this station. We might then have 'fair play' in the Navy department. The contract for providing coal to war vessels expires next February I believe, but I expect if Admiral Ferguson and other Naval officers retain their interest in the Wellington Mine that coal will be used exclusively in future as at present.

I shall write to you again if anything turns up shortly. There is nothing I would like to hear of and With best wishes I remain

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 25)

18 July 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

We gave the 'Saranac' 58 tons of new clean coal yesterday. Capt. [?] objected to come alongside the wharf, so we delivered the coal to the vessel out in the harbour. They did not get through with coaling until last evening, and none of them came ashore to settle or give me a receipt. Perhaps the steamer will call on her way back from Sitka - if not I will send a Bill down for collection.

I am very sorry to tell you that Alport left here clandestinely last week enticing and taking away with him our darling Emily. They were married, I believe, on arrival at Victoria (Page 26) and left almost immediately for England. Mrs. Bate has been very ill for some days and I myself am much dispirited and almost unnerved. You know we have thought so much of Emily, and taken such care of her, as we supposed, that to lose her in so disgraceful a manner -- to have her taken off thousands of miles, perhaps never to see her again, without even a goodbye -- has caused grief of more poignancy than I can attempt to describe. After a short stay in England, it is said Alport will go to South Africa.

Workers are going on steady, and I think that next ship or two we get will be quickly loaded.

With kindest regards in which Mrs. Bate joins.

Believe me

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 27)

30th July 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have to thank you for your kind favour of the 21st inst.

We have not been sinking the slope at Fitzwilliam Mine since you were here. We have thought it advisable, now that we have so much coal already now to open it out to, to push our levels and make room for stalls. This we are doing as steadily as possible, and of course, expect to reap the benefit in our enlarged output.

I alluded to Alport's disgraceful departure in my last note to you. The mean fellow wanted to marry Emily long ago, and on speaking to me

on the subject I told him I could not consent to her marriage till she attained her 18th year. I, moreover, only two weeks or so before he left, told him that if he concluded to go to South Africa, Emily should meet him in England in two years time if they desired to do so. He told me he should be in no hurry to leave and would consider whether he should go or not, but he never after said a word to me about leaving or about Emily. He [though?], I have since ascertained, instead of being in no hurry, began at once to prepare for clearing out. He grossly deceived me, and I will punish him for the sorrow he has inflicted on our family. He shall not sail under false colours.

Bichard is doing quite a business with Dunsmuir & Co. He was stopping to take about 2000 tons next month. I am glad you give him the “privilege” of finding customers for himself.

I am sorry to say Mrs. Bate is far from well. She grieves deeply about Emily, is continually crying, and it [pains?] me that she does not get in better spirits.

Emily says Mrs. Bermingham was very kind to her at San Francisco. Naughty girl as she is, we much appreciate any little act of kindness towards her. The children miss her very much.

With best wishes, believe me

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 29)

31st July 73

Dear Sir

I shall be glad if you can come to Nanaimo by return of steamer or by canoe if it will not discommode you, to see if we can arrange for you to take the position in our office you personally applied for last week.

I am, Dear Sir

Yours very truly for the Company.

M. Bate

C. Loat Esq.

(Page 30)

18 Aug 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Your kind note of the 4th inst. is to hand. Please accept our best thanks for your sympathy in the matter of Emily's sudden departure. So far as regards myself, I have pretty well got over the shock, but Mrs. Bate, I am sorry to say, shows plainly the effect the loss of Emily has had upon her. She pines dreadfully. Won’t have a thing Emily left behind disturbed etc.

[Bichard’s?] new ship - the [Remijio?] left for your port the other day with a load of Dunsmuir Coal, and the 'North Star' is about loaded also bound for your port. The Wellington got in on the 8th and it is her turn next. The [Remijio?], I am told, did not (Page 31) cost her owner $5,000! Bryden tells me (it's very seldom he lets out anything of Dunsmuir's affairs) that Bichard has written to Dunsmuir wanting to get coal cheaper, but that Dunsmuir won't hear of it. He says Bichard writes that we are selling 10,000 tons at [$11.40?] per ton and he (Bryden) wanted to know if this is so. I said "[?], Australian and English is selling at about $10.00 and the chances are it will soon be lower, and if Bichard gets about $9.00 for Wellington coal, at this time, he is doing well." I don't intend for Dunsmuir to know what we are doing anyway. We have played enough into his hands!

We are in a fix for Rails for the wharf - the high one - and the road to it, so that we shall have to manage with the low one at Fitzwilliam mine till we get a supply shortly expected from London. In loading the 'Shooting Star'. we had, in my opinion, a sad mess. The chutes not being finished caused a great deal of trouble to get the coal into the cars. I hope we shall get things in order by and bye.

With best wishes, Your very truly

M. Bate

(Page 32)

15 Aug 73

My Dear Mother

I wrote to you in May last, also in April. In the one letter, I sent you half a sovereign and in the other I enclosed a Bill of Exchange for 5 Pounds which I hope reached you in due course. I shall send herewith half a sovereign, and very shortly will submit to you a larger amount.

In the note I got from D. [Bartham?] last week, he tells me you were not

very well. I need scarcely say, my dear Mother, that to hear that you are not in good health causes me to be uneasy and gives me pain. I am praying for the pleasure of seeing you again in the flesh. There is nothing in this world that I desire so much as to have you taken care of, that you might be spared for me to embrace you once more. God protect and preserve my dear Mother.

We are all pretty well I'm pleased to say. Lucy was to write to you last week and I hope she did so. She said she would send you half a sovereign.

Our little ones are frequently inquiring when we are going to take them to England to see their Grandma, and sometimes comfortable and prosperous as my position here is, I feel like preparing to go Home, if only just for the trip. Were it not for our large family, (Page 33) I do not think I should hesitate long to make a start. We could reach London in less than a month from the time of leaving Nanaimo, but I cannot make ready to make departure from this place yet a while.

Elizabeth and her husband and all their children were well when I heard from them about a week ago, and I am pleased to state they are prospering - doing better than for some time past. Their oldest boy, Adam Henry, has been staying with us for a week or two during the School Holidays, and our boys, of course, were glad of his company.

I shall be writing again very soon, and I hope it will not be long before I hear that your health has improved.

Give my Kind love to my Uncles, Aunts and cousins, and to all inquiring friends, and accept for yourself and Father-in-law the never failing love of Sara Anne and your Affectionate Son

M. Bate

(Page 34)

24 Aug 73

My dear Mr. [Wild?]

I beg to thank you for your kind favour of the 19th July.

I can well understand Mr. Robin's anxiety to have an early interview with Mr. Bell and I can readily believe that he would let nothing stand in the way of their getting together - so very zealous is he in looking to the company's prosperity - Mr. Bell, perhaps, with regard to the Wellington coal being found on the Harewood Estate, and some other similar matters, might have come to a conclusion somewhat hastily but there can be no doubt, I think, about his being able to give much good advice with reference to our works generally. I don't mean to offer an opinion against him on mining matters. I may be allowed to remark, however, that judging from what he let drop once or twice while here, he might rather undervalue the old Douglas Pit, although on his last look down the pit he said he was more favourably impressed than on his first inspection. It is my firm belief that Douglas Pit has yet to “see much better days.”

I shall be pleased to get the 18 Shares just when you consider it is the proper time to buy. Desirous as I am to hold 20 shares at least, it would not be wise, I think, for me to urge a purchase at a high premium.

Harewood has the advantage to our Company, over other [?] Coal land

(Page 35) that it borders our present Estate, but the Coal of Harewood might be of less value than is apparent, and it might be otherwise, for the seam exposed has not been well examined i.e. worked into. Three or four years ago, if I recollect rightly, you mentioned that the Harewood Estate was offered for 2,500 Pounds!

I was not sorry to learn of the failure of Mr. J. D. Pemberton’s scheme re Baynes Sound. Before long, I apprehend, one or the other of the Comox Coal claims will be actually worked. The “Union” claim as far as can be seen on the surface, is certainly a valuable property, and when once the road is laid with rails and the necessary rolling stock obtained, it will be an easy job to dig coal from the seams at the Outcrop, and a large area can be worked level free. The Union directors say they will not accept less then $55,000 for the whole claim. Several [1/11?] interests- I imagine can be bought at $3,000.00. There has not been more than $10,000.00 expended on the property altogether.

I never lose an opportunity to prevail on Mr. Bryden to get on with the filling in at the swamp. The men at the drain have a great work before them, and it seems a mistake that the job was not commenced at an earlier date. The only thing to do now is to hurry the men on and get the cutting through before the end of October.

There is great excitement among us just now about the discovery of whole mountains, the reports say, of iron ore on Texada Island near Comox. Some of the government officials are staking off claims, and a day or two ago, the Lieut. Governor and four or five other gentlemen went to the Island on H.M.S. ['Myrmidon'?].

Our Wellington friends are certainly getting along first rate. They have a knack of taking away from our Establishment, as they (Page 36) want them, our best men- whether miners, [Enginemen?] or Roadmen, and, what seems very strange to me, the persons whom my colleagues crack up as smart useful hands are the ones to go. Egerton seems to act in the capacity of general traveling agent. His last move, I hear, is to get the American war vessels coaled at Esquimalt.

(Page36)

The U.S.S. 'Shubrick' was coaled at that port by [HBC?] ships the other day because there was no coal in Victoria. Hitherto, the Yankees have come to us, but by [facing?] the engineers etc. Egerton might win them over. Nearly 80 tons a day it is said are coming out of the Wellington Mine, and, going to the wharf daily, and for all of their coal, Dunsmuir Diggle etc. are getting $5.50 per ton. I mentioned this in a note to Mr. Bermingham, in acknowledgment of which he says "Dunsmuir telegraphed Bichard some time since he was offered 5.50 for all his coal for this market and if B. wanted it at that price he could take it. Bichard told me the other day that after showing me the dispatch that as he had some old vessels that would be difficult to find employment for elsewhere, he had no course but to accept of Dunsmuir’s offer, but he now regrets it very much as he can't dispose of the coal at previous [?] prices and is obliged to store more [?] of his receipts.

You can easily imagine what can be done with Wellington coal here when English is selling at about [?] by the [?] 300 tons [?] for that [?] this very day. Still, the fact remains the Wellington people are getting 5.50 per ton for their coal. You will doubtless take the opportunity of talking over with Mr. Rosenfeld the question of price of coal as well as rate of freight. The latter probably is the easiest to remedy.

You would perceive by my last note to you that I advocate the examination by bore of the metals underlying the Newcastle coal. I believe there are indications of a lower seam outside Newcastle Island. The Chase River coal [?] off Douglas Shaft has hardly been taken out. The fault or up throw as it appears should be proved at once. We are working, as I have stated in official letters, along parallel and close to the fault and in the [?] both ways there is good thick workable coal-so good and thick that a man is working by that told me of a narrow drift. It is more than possible that the jump upward may change the character of the coal altogether and I think you will agree with me that we cannot [?] to soon whether this is the case or not. Cooper praises the Chase River coal highly for the locomotives.

I am glad to be able to state that I now feel as strong [?] for work as ever, and hoping you are well and with kind regards

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild,

Yours very Sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 37) [overwritten and blurred]

 

1 Sept 73

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am extremely obliged for your kind note of the 19th inst.

It is singular that the idea which suggested itself to me was exactly the explanation Bichard gives respecting doing business with the Wellington Co.-that is- he wanted to find employment for his vessels, and although he pays a good price for his coal, I suppose he comes out right in the end. Were it not for the Navy and Bichard, Dunsmuir would not sell much coal just now. The Wellington Co have evidently got the best of the bargain with Bichard.

The Bark 'Wellington' has been at Departure Bay since the 8th ultimo and Capt Cathers does not expect to get away till the 3rd or 4th inst. It is not surprising to hear of English coal finding its way to your market with prices so high in England. The Australian coal, however, is the great sale of the coal business in San Francisco, I expect, and we shall have to stand off, I suppose, while it has the field.

I am certain Broderick vessels taking over time with another load about as quick at Fitzwilliam mine as they would from this side. I will tell you one thing: their order invariably asked for new seam coal, and it would seem they like to fight for the sake of the extra bit. [?] It is true we can load their schooner quicker here if we have no other vessel under the shute at the same time, but in the case of a large vessel being at the wharf, [they?] would only be entitled to the coal passing over the machine and then would have to give way if a steamer required fuel. They always have it to themselves at the new mine.

We took out from the bottom of the shaft last month of 'Chase River' coal 157 tons. It has been mixed with the Douglas Coal except for a few tons given for steamers use. I believe it is a good steam coal, and we have it at the back of the heading 14 ft thick, but I am afraid from the latest appearance of the coal it will not hold out so thick and clean.

I am very glad to hear Mr. Rosenfeld had a pleasant trip to England and that he enjoyed good health and spirits. He will finally visit London. The Directors of our Co will be so pleased to see him particularly Mr. Wild whom you will recollect and who is now returned from Cape Town.

Hoping yourself and family are well, and with best wishes and kind regards in which Mrs. Bate joins.

I am

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 39)

4 Sept 73

J. Jones Esq.

Savannah, Georgia

My dear Sir

I am in receipt of your letter informing me that you are not disposed to sell your property on the Esplanade for One thousand dollars ($1,000.) and I have notified the intending purchaser - Capt. Spalding, our Magistrate of your decision.

Enclosed I send you statement of account and vouchers by the former [.?] You will perceive I have in hand $44.50, but I have yet to get Fiddick’s house whitewashed and some repairs are wanted inside the building. It will not take much to do what is necessary.

On Page's Bill, you will notice he alluded to a small house close to the office-meaning Fiddick's. Since Mr. Nicol left, I have been living in the Boarding House, as it was called, and we have the office in one end of the building.

Nanaimo is beginning to show signs of improvement in various new directions. If you make up your mind to come here, I have no doubt you will find an opening in some business that may be agreeable to you.

A great many of the old faces are still among us and some I am glad to say are prospering.

Accept the kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and myself for yourself and Mrs. Jones and believe me I remain

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 40)

18 Sept 73

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have your kind favour of the 5th instant for which I am much obliged. With regard to Bichard’s arrangement with Dunsmuir, it would seem the former is already bound to take the Coal for another year. If he has made a bad bargain, he has himself only to blame. Would it be worth while your trying to do any business with Bichard by and by in order to frustrate the Wellington people? We have only this week resumed operations at the foot of Fitzwilliam Slope and it will probably take some time to get through to the coal, but, of course, this will mainly depend upon the extent of the [want?]. There are no breaks or dislocations in the seams as far as we have proved it. The character of the 'cup' we have is quite common in coalfields. It is simply the coal washed away apparently by some (Page 41) sudden rush of water during the formation of the seam, and for aught any one can say. we may have the coal close at hand and it might be otherwise.

The clearance of mud is still going on, but we are not making headway so rapidly as I could wish. There is only room for two or three men to work at the job together. Dunsmuir talks of buying a lot of the Seattle Coal Co plant, which it is said is for sale. There are conflicting accounts about the Wellington mine, but the prevailing opinions of the workmen is that the coal does not go under the ridges ahead and on either side of the slope . If such is the case, a few years will exhaust the present mine. They are taking out. I believe. 70 to 80 tons a day.

I am much pleased to hear Mr. Rosenfeld will have a good stay in London. The secretary informs me the Directors have not yet fully digested the opinions of Mr. Bell and Mr. [Hayward?] upon the future working of the mines, but that I shall soon be put in possession of their wishes.

Many thanks for your goodness in sending me a box of grapes and watermelons - the former I received in good order but the latter did not come to hand at all.

Could you kindly obtain and send by one of the ships 'Garrats’ illustrated and descriptive price List of Gauge Cocks, Oil cups etc. etc. It would be very useful to me. I shall look for the 'Panther' back. When is the 'Arkwright' due here? If you can send the 'Camden' back to the new mine, it will do a good job.

With best wishes of Mrs. Bate and myself

I remain

Very sincerely yours.

M. Bate

(Page 42)

2nd Oct 73

Private

My Dear Mr. Wild

Your kind letter of 20th and 26th August I received in Victoria in the 27th ultimo, and I was pleased rather than otherwise to note by the latter that the Board evinced some little interest in the marriage of Mr. Alport and my daughter. That you may understand why I used the word 'clandestine' and why I wrote somewhat harshly of Mr. Alport, I will explain at length how grossly he deceived me. About a month or five weeks before Alport's departure, he submitted to me a letter he had received from an Uncle in which a proposal was made to him to go to South Africa. He spoke of his Uncle's wealth, and thought a chance was open for him, which might never recur again. After some further talk. he asked my consent to his betrothal to my daughter so that he might take her with him if he went. I declined to give consent, solely on account of the girl's youth, and told him that neither Emily's Mamma nor myself were willing to part with her yet awhile. He asked that I should keep his Uncle's letter a few days, show it to Mrs. Bate, and he hoped I would change my mind. On giving him the letter a week or so afterward, he enquired if we had thought anything more about our previous conversation concerning my daughter. I told him again we could not think of parting with the girl for a year or two. He replied he was afraid his Uncle would not keep the offer open, and he did not know how to act. I told him I should

(Page 43) be very sorry to lose him, but if he thought as he said, the position he would get from his Uncle would be so much better than anything he could ever expect to attain out here, it might be well for him to go. If he did go, I said that Mrs. Bate and myself would have no objection, if they were so much attached to each other, to Emily following him in charge of some reputable family and meeting him in England, say, in two years hence. Alport, seeming pleased, said, "You pledge yourself to that?" I again told him if it was Emily's wish to meet him or go to him, she should do so when of age. Alport then said he had not “written to his Uncle yet and would think over what he would do". He never afterwards said a word to me, either about leaving his place here, or with respect to my daughter but at once, as I have since learned, began to prepare, aided by his brother Arthur, to get my child away and leave clandestinely, knowing that he was taking the girl to South Africa, so at all events believing that was his intention, you can imagine what pain his conduct caused myself and Mrs. Bate - how deeply it would hurt us to be so shamefully bereft of a child. I myself soon got over the loss, but Mrs. Bate was in hysterics for nearly three weeks. Alport was telegraphed to at San Francisco and informed of the state of his mother-in-law's health – and was begged to come back but he appears to have got away as quickly as steamer could carry him. You will I know, from the unbounded confidence I had in Mr. Alport, that I could never have looked for such perfidy from him. Had I anticipated his intentions, I would not allowed an elopement to take place. The business should have been done honorably, but by a private note left behind unintentionally, I see how Alport pressed the child and got her to commit herself, as he no doubt easily could do from his greater age and experience. For nearly four years till she was 15 1/2 years old…

(Page 44) Emily has been away from home at Queens College, Victoria, and you will think it natural for me to desire a year or two of our dear Child's company for our own comfort as well as for the good of her younger Brothers and sisters. She has gone, however, and I have not the least doubt that her husband, who, apart from this one rash and dishonorable act, has always been a upright and worthy man, will properly appreciate the sacrifice she made in leaving her parents to cast her lot with him. So young did Emily appear, that the first clergyman they presented themselves to in Victoria refused to marry them on account of her tender age. The second one they called upon was not so considerate. On arrival in England, Emily wrote a long letter, and also a letter written in San Francisco, and on receipt of yours in Victoria I telegraphed to Alport in England to come back to Nanaimo. And that I would welcome him.

(Page 45)

I did not get an answer before leaving Victoria, and it is probable that he, too, left for the Cape ere my message reached England. Indeed, it was evident that when Alport sailed from here he was fully bent on going to Cape Colony. And it was that, as much as anything, that prolonged Mrs. Bate's illness. Had he brought Emily here to us, if only to say ‘goodbye’, we might soon have forgiven his rashness and sent him on his way rejoicing. But he will spare us pains, I'm sure, to promote his wife's happiness, and we cannot do otherwise than wish them much joy and prosperity, wherever they may go.

Please accept my thanks for the Certificates of two shares in the Company Stock. I must wait for the balance until they are available on lower terms.

If Mr. Bell had seen the Newcastle seam as I saw it at Nanaimo River the

(Page 44) other day, I think he would modify his opinion of that coal as a whole, or at least, before denouncing it, take a little more time to consider the ground upon which his impression was given. The fact is we do not push on the exploration of the Newcastle seam as we ought or might, nor can I get Mr. Bryden to move things any faster. At the rate we are going on, we shall have the Wellington people shipping as much coal as we do before long. The last two yards of the Newcastle slope, the workmen reported the coal better than any had passed through and Sage only asked for the New Winch to enable him to get on with the sinking. He has always had the small winch we took from the ['Fedelite'?]. I am afraid Mr. Bell will, unfortunately, be all wrong in his idea of lower seams existing under the Newcastle. I was inclined that way until two weeks ago but I am now [only?] (Page 45) realize the Wellington, Newcastle and Chase River Coals are identical as to seams. I recommend a Bore on the opposite side of the Bay to the Newcastle where there is a good coal field for working and, in case we are successful with a bore, we might make use of that splendid bit of footage where Harewood water is deep close inshore? Whoever gets hold of Harewood is almost sure to want the spot I refer to for Wharf and Shipping purposes.

In my official letter yesterday, I alluded to a conversation I had with Mr. Bichard on the way to Victoria. I [----] to [------] he told me he had a trial made of Wellington coal for gas and it was found "no good for gas" Mr. Rosenfeld wrote at the time, well after the trial of Wellington Coal for the same purposes, that it was equal to our Douglas.

Alport's departure, as you suppose, gave me a deal of extra work. All the stock book headings to be written up just as he left. I was at the desk nearly all day and night (not to mention) Sunday in July being determined that the official business should not suffer.

Mr. Loat, this gentleman I have with me most for clerk. He draws $100.00 a month. I have told him I should hear from the Board.

I should be greatly pleased if Alport retraces his steps [-------]. To have her darling daughter near her will add much to my wife's comfort.

With best wishes I remain dear Mr. Wild.

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 46)

3rd. October 73

My Dear Mother

I was much pleased to receive your kind letter of the 25th of June informing me that you were better in health than when my dear Aunt Lucy wrote to me. How it cheered me to hear the good news you cannot tell. My first thought was to thank God, and to ask him to care for you in your declining years. Your letter reached Comox all right, and Elizabeth and her husband wish me to say how glad they are to hear from you. My intention was to buy a cottage for you, but I think instead I will continue to send you money to pay your rent and keep you comfortable where you are. Do you owe anybody anything? I mean are you in arrears with your rent or anything else? Please let me know. Lucy has written to you at last I believe. I see her two or three times a week and she is quite well. Her husband also is in good health. I send enclosed a portrait of Sarah Anne. It was taken last week. I also send one of our little boy William and will forward some more in my next letter. We made a trip to Victoria last week and spent two or three days there. We had Aunt [Marie?] with us most of the time and enjoyed ourselves fully, riding around the city. I got the letter from John Mark but not the one you say William Bate sent me.

You misunderstood me dear Mother when I wrote about a Photo of myself. I wanted one taken long before the 'Carter' you returned to me. Have you the one I left at home which I had taken at Birmingham? I think that was on glass.

All of us are well at this time. I am glad to say. I am getting quite stout and Sarah Anne you will see by her photograph is not very thin. Mark is growing very fast in fact and all the children are healthy and strong.

You will be surprised to hear that Emily is married and gone to South Africa. We didn't wish her to get married so soon. Her husband is a noble fellow, a steady and worthy man and had very wealthy friends where they have gone to. He has been clerk in our office for some years so that I can bear testimony to his good character. His name is Charles Augustus Alport, and his parents reside at Kent, England.

I send enclosed 5 pounds which I trust will be applied to the best advantage - in keeping you comfortable. Please give our kind love to Uncles, Aunts and cousins and accept the same for yourself and father-in-law,

from Your loving son

Mark

(Page 48)

4 Oct 1873

Nanaimo Vancouver Island

My dear David

I have postponed our acknowledgment of your three welcome letters of the 21st Jan'y and 5th June for some weeks because I wanted to send a photo of my darling Sally. We have been away from home making a trip to Victoria the Capital of the province, which is about 80 miles from here, and while at Victoria we got two or three photographs of Mama and three of the children. I send you two, and will let you have more when I next write, which (Page 49) will be in the course of, say, a month when I will also drop a few lines to my good old friend D. Pearce.

The 'Colliery Guardian' and 'Mining Annual' come to hand with every Mail, and I thank you most sincerely for your thoughtfulness and great kindness in transmitting these papers to me. They are invaluable out here, are just the Journals I want, and, I hardly know how I could now do without them. It must be no small job to you packing up such a bundle of papers weekly. Your goodness, my dear David, is fully appreciated and you are thanked often without knowing it.

Enclosed I send you 1st of exchange for 5 pounds to pay for the Books papers etc. you obtain for me. There is published at the Colliery Guardian office I saw "The Colliery Manager Pocket Book". It comes out yearly. I shall be very thankful if you will procure it and send it to me.

All our family are well I am glad to state. Emily is married. I did not wish her to marry so young, and would have been better pleased if she had waited two or three years longer. Her husband however is a fine clever fellow in

every sense of the word, and I am sure will make of the best of husbands. I have had him in our office for some years, and know him to be most worthy young man. They have both gone to South Africa where Alport i.e. Emily's husband has an uncle- a wealthy old chap who sent for them. Emily you will now understand is Mrs. Alport. I must say (being only 36 years old) I don't like the prospect of being a Grandfather so soon. Sarah Anne and myself frequently have a laugh about this part of the business.

Ask your dear father and mother, all Uncles, Aunts, and cousins, not forgetting dear Grandmother to accept our kindest love, and please tell my dear Mother I wrote to her yesterday August 1st sending her a portrait of Sarah Anne which I know she will be glad to have. Sarah Anne will send a photo to any of her old friends who may desire one.

Accept yourself, dear David, our kindest love and hoping you are well.

Believe me to remember

your affectionate cousin

M. Bate

(Page 50)

8 Oct 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I made a trip to Victoria just after penning my last note to you and arrived in time to see the 'Prince Alfred' depart. I only had an opportunity to shake hands with the Capt. and Purser before the steamer moved off. Your kind favour of the 20th crossed me going up on the 'Emma', as I was on the way down, Broderick's people spoke to me about the freighting of coal from Newcastle Island and I reiterated what I had written to you. I understand they would carry from the Island at a reduced price. I told them we would do everything possible to accommodate their vessels and hope you will succeed in bringing them to terms. Broderick was all right during my stay in Victoria - was very active, and seemed attentive to his business. For his own good, he should keep straight.

If you write to Mr. Bell kindly remember me and Mrs. Bate to him!

We got a long letter from Emily from England, and while in Victoria, Mrs. Bate prevailed on me to telegraph to them to come back to Nanaimo. I sent a cable message accordingly, but I am afraid they were off for Africa before the telegram would reach Herne Bay.

I have great hopes of getting a (Page 51) good working seam at the bottom of the shaft. If it only keeps as we at present have it, we shall have a glorious thing. I am almost afraid it’s too good to last. We got over 200 tons as the produce last month, from narrow headings, of five men.

The clearing away of mud from the level is slow and tedious work. We are digging in as fast as possible, but are yet at some distance from the Break.

I did not hear of 'Austin' getting aground at the Island last trip. There was no need for mooring ship at the wharf, nor do I think they do so. The shutes were moved along the wharf to avoid hauling. I know 'Austin' would rather load at Nanaimo. They all do, some of them because they are near town.

By the papers, I was pleased to see that the ['Costa Rica'?] is not so much damaged as anticipated. I hope she will be speedily repaired and at little cost. I had a little chat with Mr. N[icholas] Bichard on the way to Victoria. Among other things, he told me Dunsmuir coal was no good for gas. I answered that was so! He has now two vessels at Departure Bay. He is, in fact, talking about all the Wellington coal. The 'Douglas' is coming to us for coal for the government - lighthouses, offices & etc. They say they prefer our Douglas to the Wellington.

Mr. Phelan, it seems, was after the Baynes Sound Mine, not the Wellington as maintained in your note. He went to Comox in the 'Emma' with a decided intention to invest it was said. On his return, I was told he had determined to keep his money. He did not stop at our mines. They steamed slowly past Newcastle and into the harbour after lying some hours at the Wellington wharf. Excuse this horribly written note and believe me.

Yours Very Sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 52)

9 Oct 1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

Will you have the goodness to inform me by first opportunity what is the amount claimed on the note against Mr. C.N. Chantrell upon which payment is now pending?

If there is a probability of judgment being given before I can hear from you? Please pay the amount of the claim, say $300, which I think is somewhere near it, and I will refund the sum you pay to you?

Your Mr. Jackson underestimated the case, and as you have hitherto acted as Mr. Chantrell’s' legal adviser perhaps you will readily see that, in his absence, his interests are not neglected. Mr. Chantrell, as you are probably aware, has a valuable property here upon which I have a Mortgage - the amount of my loan, however, $400 and interest is only a small portion of the value of the Chantrell land.

By giving this matter your best attention, you will oblige

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 53)

10 Oct. 1873

Nanaimo

Private

Gentlemen

I addressed you yesterday requesting you to pay the amount of Rodell's claim against C.N. Chantrell, and I beg now to request that you will not let it be known that I agree to reimburse to you the sum due on the note for which judgment is asked.

The note, I understand, was discounted - obtained for a very few dollars, and I am told the original holder was paid something on account, but I do not know if this latter statement is true. At any rate I believe on Mr. Chantrell’s return from the upper country, it will be found that a legal action could be taken on the matter.

Of course you will let it be understood that you are acting for Mr. Chantrell. I do not wish at present to figure in the matter.

I am, gentlemen,

Yours very truly

M. Bate

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

(Page 54)

21 Oct 73

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have your kind note of the 4th instant for which I am much obliged. Phelan, I understand, did not like any of the Comox Coal claims, and as regards Baynes Sound, it is rumoured that he stated in Victoria that the estimate for building wharf, making road etc. is at least 50% too low. I presume it is the estimate of Trutch, [Paston?] Co that is meant.

For steam or gas purposes, I suppose there will be no need for screening coal? but for house use, I expect the clean coal is always preferred, though it may be rather dearer than the unscreened.

When in Victoria, I told Broderick etc. that we would accommodate them in every possible way when their vessels go to Newcastle. Their talk about [--?] going to the island etc is all moonshine. I tell the Captain of the 'Emma' or 'B Diamond' to call on us at any hour and, (Page 55) and it is hardly one time in a dozen that the vessels arrive during working hours. They come in at midnight or early on the morning at one and we are at the wharf by 7 o'clock! This is invariably the case. When you write them again tell Broderick & Co, please, that I say we do everything in our power to oblige them, give shipping papers at all hours, and if they can only let me know and give some Signal when they are going to the new wharf there will be no need for the vessel to stay here specially to get an order. I should say moreover that 'Emma' or 'Diamond' generally have freight to discharge at the [----] wharf. so that you will see they do not always stop merely to “get an order”.

I was indeed glad to see that the 'Costa Rica' was saved and the account you kindly sent me of her resurrection I read with much interest. Many thanks for the box of grapes. It came to hand in fine order, also did Bryden’s.

We are keeping the 'Shooting Star' hatches blocked this trip. I don't think Austin has any hired men. In fact, I imagine he could not get any. Labour is very scarce. Could we get about 10 good Chinamen from your city – at $1.00 a day for 12 hours? We, of course, find houses for them.

The 'Prince' had a splendid run up last time- which I was pleased to notice- Victorian people, as far as I could learn, seem well pleased with their mail steamer now.

The big freight we are paying Pope and Talbot take the shine off our profits. The last cargo or two will not net above $4.40 to $4.43 per. This is rather a low figure compared with the $5.50 Dunsmuir, Diggle, etc. are receiving. When are we going to get some of the Popes [Blairs?] or any other ships at about $4.00? I should think those big vessels would do well at the one figure.

With kind wishes and best regards of Mrs. Bate

Believe me Dear Mr. Bermingham.

Very sincerely yours

M. Bate

How is Mr. Rosenfeld getting on? I hope himself and family are well.

(Page 56)

18th Oct.1873

Mr. B. Mellado

Nanaimo,

Sir

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th inst with the Plan and specifications of Nanaimo School House for which I thank you.

The balance due you on the school contract is in the hands of the secty and treasurer of the trustees Mr. L ([Feney?]). To whom be good enough to apply for the same.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

Chairman

Nanaimo School Trustees.

29 Oct.1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

I have yours of the 20th inst with enclosure, the contents of which I note with pleasure. Please do not let judgment issue upon Rodell's note under any circumstance. Before letting the matter come to this pass, kindly pay the claim, and as soon as I am advised I will send the amount to you.

Chantrell is looked for in Victoria very soon. In any event, you, of course, will know best what action to take in this case.

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 57)

30 Oct, 1873

Mr. John Hunter

Nanaimo

Sir

I hereby give you notice to quit and deliver up possession of the House and premises which you hold of me by the 30 November next - that is, one month from this date; and I have to request that you will in the meantime settle for the Rent now due me, namely $65.00. Should you fail to make a settlement, I shall be compelled to take steps for the recovery of the said $65.00 by process of Law.

M. Bate.

(Page 58)

3 Nov 3

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am favoured with your kind letter of the 18th inst. for which please accept my best thanks.

I have heard nothing at all lately of Mr. Phelans visit to Baynes Sound. I was told that on the return of the party to Victoria, Mr. [Gaston?] looked very much crestfallen, and no success was predicted in consequence. I am very glad to see that you are about to look after the President of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. Such Gentlemen are worth keeping note of, and I earnestly hope you will be able to make a good contract with him, and so, in a measure, recover something for the low freight the 'Shooting Star' is getting to [Guaymas?]. It will be pleasing to the Company if a demand comes (Page 59)

to you from the Mexican Port.

Referring to the Chase River Coal - bottom of shaft - it does not seem to coke well. It burns very nicely, and from the few trials made of it, to be cleaner than either of the other coals. I sent you a few sacks by the 'Panther' that you may have it experimented with in any way you choose. I believe it will go well for steam. We raised last month of this coal 230 tons. At the back of our workings - 60 yards from the shaft we have a fault, an upheaval apparently, and we want to examine it “right away”, but it takes time to get away the coal which is unusually thick alongside the elevation. Perhaps we may find a “pouch” over the fault? though I hope not.

The sweet potatoes were duly received thank you. Our little ones smack their mouths at them and think them a great treat. I got no reply to my Cable dispatch. They were probably gone before it reached England. Our Secretary tells me Mr. Rosenfeld has been to the London Office and they had talked over matters etc. etc.

The 'Wellington', which vessel sailed from your port on the 11th ult, has not yet got to Departure Bay. Making a long trip, isn’t she? Accept best regards of Mrs. Bate and of [?]

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

P.S. A Bore is to be put down on the South end of Newcastle Island, [?] of [?] , to be followed by two others, East and West. [?] all goes well [down with the site of ?] [?] Directors.

(Page 60)

13 Nov. 1873

Nanaimo. Vancouver Island

British Columbia

Mr. David Pearce

My dear old friend.

I was exceedingly pleased to get the note you were kind enough to send

me through David Botham, though very sorry to learn by it you had just at the time you were writing, burnt your foot badly. I hope that no permanent injury followed the accident. And that long ere this time you are perfectly recovered.

There is nothing in the world I think that is so pleasing to ones mind as to hear of, or from, friends we knew in the distant past; and to get a picture of a familiar face, calls it may be, to recollection many (Page 61) pleasant reminiscences of earlier days. About 2 months ago, there arrived in this town an old Brierley Hill gentleman named Jeremiah Westwood who I think you know. He knows you very well, he says, and being a musical man himself, he is acquainted with nearly all the "Fiddlers" etc. around the neighborhood of Brierley Hill. I have had a long chat with him, and I assure you he gave me a very interesting account about many of my old associates, and of the changes the country has undergone in the 17 years since I left it. Time seems to have fled so fast that it hardly appears to me half seventeen years since I bid farewell to the shores of dear old England. (Page 61)

I am still in the music line - as fond of it as ever. We have a fine band here of 24 performers beside drums (4) and cymbals. I play a cornet that is in the band. I stick to the violin too, and a few of us spend two or three evenings a week playing to amuse ourselves.

Kindly remember me to James Grainger and Ephraim Westwood and to all other friends who may enquire about me. What has become of J. Bowman, the [Vangas?] and H. Collier? Where is George Fothergill and Charley [Kendwell?] who used to live at Moorland? When you write in acknowledgment of this, which I hope will be soon, please tell me how all the old friends are faring.

(Page 62) publications touching upon any branch of mining especially Coal mining.

We have, for some time, carefully looked in the Marriage notices in the Country Express in the expectation of seeing an announcement to the effect that you were united in the bonds of Matrimony. The, to you, all-important event does not seem to have come off yet. In case you should get a wife before this reaches you, we desire (in advance perhaps) to wish you much joy, happiness and prosperity.

I told you in my last letter that Emily is married. By this time, I suppose she is at Beaufort West, Cape Colony, South Africa. We have had communications from both her and her husband, written from England, and while en route, and they seem to be as happy as it is possible for them to be in this world. They have, I believe, a bright future before them. At all events, everything at present looks well for them.

I have not the least doubt that Emily's husband will speedily make his mark, for he is a person (Page 63) (Page 65) of most unflagging perseverance and energy. Nor is he wanting in that which is all essential – training and good education.

I forgot if I told you I received from my old friend Thomas Hughes a long, interesting letter, and I likewise heard from my Brother-in-law Mr. [Shassaly?] but, owing to a continual pressure of business, I have not been able to acknowledge either of their epistles. Please tender an apology for me to T. Hughes to whom I will write without fail in the course of the next fortnight. Also give my best respect to him. I address a newspaper to him occasionally which I hope reach his hands.

We are very glad to get some intelligence of all our old acquaintances at Home. That is, of those, who are still around you. Kindly remember us to John [Botham?] and his wife and to all others who may enquire about us. What has become of Uncle Samuel [Dovey?] It seems a long time since we heard anything of him. We are very sorry to hear that Uncle Aleck has not in all these years got rid (Page 64) ...of his drunken fits and [indeed?] it must be to have a home rendered miserable as all homes are by a father spending his hard earnings in a bar-room, or on drink -----that which neither does good to the recipient or family. Aunt Phoebe has our warmest sympathy, and earnest wishes for a reformation of her husband, if that is possible.

William is still farming, and I believe he does fairly well. His Mother complains that he does not write and we have told him so, urging him at the same time to drop a line or two in all directions his relatives are to be found. The last time we heard from him he said he was in the best of health. We have not had a letter from Sarah Anne's sister for about 4 months or more but we are daily expecting one in answer to a note of ours.

Our miners here are always in full work, and every man who comes around is sure of employment and is promptly given it. The government […..?] are about to assist immigration soon i.e. pay part of the passages of those workers to come to this (Page 64) country. I shall enclose in this letter an article on British Columbia published in one of the San Francisco journals. After perusal of it, be good enough to hand it to others to read. You might let T. Hughes and D. Pearce read it too.

I also send you herewith some more photos. That of Sarah Anne with Lizzie Ada (baby) on her knee is in the shade It was the baby’s picture we were anxious to get and therefore Mama placed herself in the background. The picture of the baby, however, is not at all a great likeness. In taking it, the face, which is an exceedingly pretty one, is moved, and one hand you will perceive is wholly thrown away and had it not been for Mama hold it, I say likely one of the legs could have taken flight also. The picture of Sally Anne is a perfect portrait. I do ask though, is it possible to get a more correct face in any picture? You will judge from her appearance probably that she is a bright, wide awake girl. There are two others George and Mary whose photographs we want to get, but we shall have to wait some time for them. [Original overwritten, sequence here is not clear]

(Page 64)

We are getting a large family around us here. We have five daughters and four boys. The oldest girl Emily is married and is likely to do extremely well. Her husband has wealthy connections; but apart from his riches he is a first rate young fellow as I well know by having him in the office with me for eight years. My wife 'Sallie' as I call her drew my attention a few weeks ago to my announcement of your eloped daughter's marriage. And at least she supposed from the names it was your daughter. Is she right? I am glad to say we are all well and I sincerely hope all your family is in the enjoyment of good health. -the greatest of all earthly blessings. Accept for yourself and Mrs. Pearce the united regards of myself and Mrs. Bate.

(Page 63)

13 Nov

My Dear David

When writing to you on the 4th ultimo, I promised to write again in the course of a month, and I now propose to return my pledge. The Mining Journal, Colliery Guardian and the Country Express Newspaper continue to come to hand regularly.

I also received the work in Mineralogy and Hopton’s [Converter?] on [-?]. The latter volume contains a great deal of useful information and is very valuable. Again, accept my hearty thanks for your great kindness and attention in transacting to me the interesting reading matter you do. You hardly know how much one prizes [it?] in this remote corner of the Globe…[-]…(Page 63)

shall probably have to wait [till some time?] for them.

Mark and Tommy whose photos, I believe I sent you some few years ago, are growing up fine. The former, nearly fourteen years old, is a very robust chap, and the head pupil in his school. He got the first prize for the last examination and bids fair to come [in at the ?].

He desires to be most affectionately remembered to my dear Mother, to all Uncles, Aunts and Friends. And he particularly requests our best love will be accepted by you, dear father and mother. Sarah Anne often repeats some of the sayings of both of them. She likely recollects more of your fathers and mothers owing to living near them so long, than she does of other uncles and aunts.

Convey our never failing love to our dear old friends and we beg you will receive the same.

With best wishes I remain my dear David

your affectionate cousin

M. Bate

(Page 66)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

20 Nov 3

I was very sorry to hear by your kind note of the 5th inst. that you had fallen down the hold of the 'Prince Alfred', and I earnestly hope you have received no permanent injury, and that ere now you have got over the effects of the fall entirely. Are you not working too hard? Five days and nights without proper rest is a terrible strain on the best constitution of man.

It will be three months at least before the large wharf at the island will be in readiness for shipping. The extension will be rather a big job, but the contractor I am sure will hurry on with all his might. Every pile we put in will be

(Page 67) sheathed with [?] metal in order to make the structure permanently strong. The depth of water when the wharf is carried out its full breadth will not be less than 2 feet alongside at the lowest spring tide. The Piles for the work are of unusual length. I am anxiously looking for the 'Arkwright' while we have fine weather. In a very short time. I expect we shall get plenty of snow.

Will you please do me a favour of having the enclosed photographs of myself and Mrs. Bate enlarged to the same size as one of Emily's we have framed. I believe the artist Mr. [?] has one of Emily so that he will see the kind we want. We do not wish frames, however, as we intend to send the pictures away. They will only need to be mounted on card. When sending the photos, kindly send the bill and I will [?] it.

We have long letters again from Alport and Emily. They were on the eve of leaving for the Cape, and were quite well and apparently in good spirits. Emily says [is?] disappointed in not getting photos, which were (after Page 67)

to have been sent after them. If you know the establishment at which their photographs were taken, I should feel extremely obliged if you would procure for us half a dozen of each - Alport and Emily.

Trusting that I'm not taking too much of your time, and hoping shortly to hear that you are well.

I am with best wishes

Yours most sincerely

M. Bate

P.S. I send two photos of Mrs. Bate. The artist can use those from which he can make the best job. Ward writes to me - that the customer for Baynes Sound has not come to time yet, but he seems intent to going in for coal and as he has lots of money, it is believed he will buy. I suppose Phelan is the customer he alludes to.

M.B.

(Page 68)

6 Nov 1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

I beg to enclose for your perusal and consideration copy of a letter I have received from Messrs Robertson & Johnson and copy of my reply.

I am sorry judgment was obtained on Chantrell's note held by Rodello. However, I suppose I have still the power to sell the property- mortgaged to me say at public auction. Please advise me by return of the 'Douglas' if I can do so, and if there is any other course you would advise me to take in the interest of Chantrell as well as myself.

I would rather, if it is safe, keep the matter in abeyance until Chantrell or his friends in England are heard from.

I am gentlemen

yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 69)

28th November 73

My Dear Mother

We have been expecting to hear from you, in answer to our last letter, for some time, and as we have something to send you we won't wait any longer for a letter to reply to. Papers come to us from you nearly every week for which please accept our thanks. About 2 months ago, we made a trip to Victoria - took 3 of the children with me, and got some good portraits of all of us. It is these pictures that I want to send you. More of my darling Sally. I know you will be especially pleased to get. They are correct likenesses, the best I think we have ever had taken in this country. Those of William and little Sallie are particularly good, but the one of [Marie?] and Lizzie, is only third rate. Sarah Anne was anxious to get a nice picture of the little one and so placed herself in the background. Lizzie, however, would not sit still. She moved her face, and does not look half so pretty as she is. She also threw her arms about, and one you will see is clean gone, and it is very likely one of the legs would have taken flight had not Mamma held it.

So much for the pictures, and now I will tell you what will (Page 70)

probably be the best news I have to convey: it is that we are all well. The children are growing up amazingly. Mark is a fine, strong, robust looking chap, and, Sally you will see by her picture is a smart, wide awake looking girl. Billy's portrait will speak for him. We will endeavour to get likenesses, of Mary and Georgie very soon and when we do get them we shall not fail to send them to you.

I think I told you in my last letter about Emily's marriage. [Her?] and her husband had a pleasant trip to England. They left London on the 24th of last month for the Cape Colony, South Africa, where their home will be for some time. They have a bright future before them, Emily's husband having wealthy connections in Africa, and as Charlie (I mean Emily's husband) is a person of unflagging perseverance and energy he will soon make his mark. We shall hear from them very soon.

William still sticks to farming and says, he is getting along first rate, and is moreover enjoying the best of health. Sarah Anne has urged him to write to you and we hope he has done so.

Please give our best love to Mary and her husband - to Thomas and his wife, to Joseph and John, all of whom we hope are quite well, and accept yourself dear Mother the never failing affection of

Your loving Son and Daughter

Mark and Sarah Ann Bate.

(Page 72)

29th Nov 73

Mr. Thomas Hughes
Harts Hill

Brierley Hill, England

My dear old friend

Your thrice-welcome letter of the 21st January last duly came to hand and you cannot conceive my delight on receipt of it. I read it over and over, your account of our doings in the distant past bring to my mind many, very many, pleasant reminiscences of earlier days and I felt a thrill of pleasure in returning my thoughts to the scenes and haunts of our childhood. I sometimes imagine that when I reach Home again (as please God I hope to do) that even if my relatives were nearly all gone - if there were no familiar face to give me a kindly greeting. I should still feel a glow of affection for the trees, the books, and the hills where in boyhood we wandered and whiled away many an innocent hour.

(Page 71)

Your promise that my letters shall be promptly answered gives me cheer, and to know that I am frequently spoken of and hold a place in the memory of your dear wife and family is most pleasing to me. Believe me, dear Tom, I have felt no little interest in hearing from time to time, through my dear Mother and others of your prosperity, nor have I forgotten to often inquire about you. Excepting the information you gave me respecting John and Thomas Petford, I do not recollect hearing anything of them for the last ten years at least, and I am very sorry you were not able to communicate rather more encouraging intelligence of their position and character. Alas! It is a weakness too many have to take to the publican what would render their homes comfortable, and make themselves flourish. I have a slight remembrance of the circumstances connected with our going to the Baptist Chapel to meet the Girls, and you pay me a high compliment (do you not?) when you say I on that occasion introduced you to a fortune. Fortunate indeed is the man who has the happy home you seem to posses and I most sincerely wish that all your (Page 74) family may be long preserved to enjoy the blessing of each other’s society. Your situation as superintendent engineer under Messrs Cochrane and Co. I hope is one of increasing advantages. Certainly 130 Pounds per year appears a small salary for the important and probably laborious duties, which are imposed on you. As you suppose, we pay a man occupying a similar position to yours a much larger salary. I am still in the office to which I was posted some 5 years ago, have a gross income of 750 Pounds a year, a fine house, fuel etc. furnished, grates and, of course, am saving money. It costs me considerable, however, to get the children well educated. 400 Pounds has been spent on one girl, who I am proud to say is in every way an accomplished young lady, a good linguist, a good pianist and a beautiful singer. Our oldest boy, now nearly 14, I intend to make a Coal and Mining Engineer because he is so far forward with his mathematical studies, and is fond of mechanical drawing. Our family largely outnumbers yours. We have five girls and four boys. Pretty good you will say for us young folk. My wife is not yet 35. How is Charles Brooks getting on? Where is he? You do not tell me anything about him and I (Page 73) ...therefore infer that he is away from Home- perhaps in the States. I learned first after your poor father's death of the accident which deprived him of life, and I noticed also with pain an announcement in the Brierley Hill paper of the death of your Brother, who, I had not forgotten, but I had not heard of the sad loss to you of your darling children. They are better off no doubt - ushered a few short years before their time into the realms of eternal peace.

I am exceedingly glad though I am not surprised to hear of lack of [--] success in life. [Blurred] He was always for going ahead and he had many opportunities, which he made the best of, which I did not rightly recognize the many kindnesses his good father showed to me. Give my best love, if you please, to Joseph and his father whenever you meet them and tell them I should dearly like to hear from them both. I expect, like myself, they have their hands full of work, but they may manage perhaps to write half a dozen lines which would be very acceptable.

Enclosed I shall send you photographs of myself and wife which please show to any friends you like. That of Sallie, as I call her, was taken a few weeks ago, mine was taken last summer. It is not a clear picture. It, however, shows the features clear enough. May I ask you to send in return a shot of yourself and Mrs. Hughes? I shall be delighted to see your faces if only represented by a few pictures.

My old sweetheart Mary [Pearsdale?], you tell me is a widow with seven children. I am sorry to hear that. Should you or Mrs. Hughes see her, be good enough to tell her I sympathize with her on having lost her natural supporter and protector.

In conclusion, allow me to ask you to give our best love to my dear Mother and be most kind to remember me to all old and enquiring friends, and for yourself and Mrs. Hughes accept the kindest and best regards of Mrs. Bate and myself and believe me to remain.

With sincere wishes for your welfare

Your affectionate friend

M. Bate

(Page 75)

1st. Dec 73

PRIVATE

Dear Mr. Wild

I am extremely sorry to hear by your kind note of the 25th October that you did not see my daughter in London. I had been fully expecting that you would get a little chat with her, and I should hear of her seeing you. I am much disappointed that Alport did not take her specially to call on you for I am certain he would know I should have been greatly pleased had he done so. Writing me from Herne Bay, they both spoke of visiting London and Alport stated that he had received a polite note from Mr. Robins asking him to call at 81 Mildred’s Court. He told me he should call; hence I supposed they would both meet you. However, you can well imagine, I dare say, how it cheers me that you are able to corroborate what Alport told me regarding his Uncle's position in business etc., and I am gratified to know that you esteem the Cape a better place to enjoy life than Vancouver, and that the climate as Beaufort is all that could be desired. I had been given to understand that the country Alport goes to is deluged with rain in the cold season, and that in the hot months scarcely a shower falls to refresh the earth. Alport writes to me very imploringly - hopes my anger against him is modified and begs that I will now accept his connection into our family etc.-- does not think many years will elapse before they meet us all again, and hopes that all his past misdeeds will be forgiven; and then adds, “as they have had no letter from us they will expect to receive our forgiveness and wishes for their well-being at Beaufort West.” He got the telegram I sent after him, and says, referring to it. “For Emily's (Page 76) sake as well as my own, I think I should be most imprudent if I gave up on my Uncle's offer for anything I could hope for in B.C. All my relations in England take the same view of the matter". My earnest wish is that the future will bring them all the happiness they are no doubt looking forward to. They have full forgiveness from me not withstanding the great anguish Alport caused in my house by leaving and taking the child away, as he did. Mrs. Bate still grieves about her darling-- cries almost every time the little ones talk about Emily and has made up her mind her daughter will never see her again. Of course, I try to make her believe otherwise.

I am very sorry to hear of the accident Mr. Robins mother met with, and I hope the unfortunate event may be got over without ill results.

Our progress, I cannot help but confess, is rather slow in some directions. Sometimes I think there is room for considerable improvement in different branches of our mining operations as well as in the shipping department at the Island and I sincerely trust the young gentleman who is coming to assist Mr. Bryden will see where we can amend matters. I presume he has had a few years experience in mine work and if so will soon get acquainted with all the particulars of our establishment. According to my ideas, and I do not mention this without a cause, we want more correct and carefully kept time sheets. We seem to have got into a loose system, and do my utmost I am unable to break through it. Men refuse to take their money on payday because their time is not right - some men's names are not given in at all, and our pay sheet, before we get through with the pay, is a perfect jumble of figures. We got the sheet made up to find out afterwards that it has to be very materially added to - altered etc., which beside giving the book a disorderly appearance [involves?] unnecessary, trouble. I am sure you will think we ought to have time properly kept and recorded - an object of no little importance, and a business that only requires attention, without which negligence follows as a consequence. We have been shipping coal (Page 78)

from Fitzwilliam mine over a year, and up to this time have not so much as a little framework fixed to suspend a chute by. Every vessel that goes to the Island has to hoist and hang the chute by its own tackle, and when the ship moves to get coal in to different hatches the chute is pulled on the wharf by about a dozen Chinamen, who after have to push the chute over the ships side before it is used again. I am almost ashamed to inform you we are laughed at by nearly all the Captains for being so much behind with our means of loading at this new place, and it is with the greatest reluctance that I state Mr. Bryden does not appear to notice what an immense waste of labour is caused by the system we work upon. I cannot at times avoid feeling annoyed and angry that so many things about the new Island pit are left unfinished, No bin cars (the small mine cars, tipped into the shale with a lever are used) no [?] to dump the coal into (Page 77)

as it comes from the mine, and no chute, or pocket, or sloping Bin, to store Coal in, although timber has been on the ground the whole summer to build one or the other. Bryden probably does not like me to draw attention (which is all I can do) to the wants of our business in the directions I have indicated, but the improvements, very often promised, are so long delayed that I have to keep hammering away.

We are slowly increasing the force of workmen in the Pitch, but I am afraid it will be some time before we have many stalls going below the No 1 level. Every month, however, I hope will show some extension of our available mining space. It will be a considerable time, I am certain, ere the No 1 level is cleared of mud - perhaps 6 or 8 months, if not more. There are large rocks met with which retard progress greatly as we near the stall, in which the break is supposed to have occurred, we might get some big stones a less soft stuff. There is such an uncertainty about the back faces, that my colleague does not apparently know when it will be safe to work, and where unsafe, so that we may have to go to the very end of the level [?] or nearly so, to get coal. Of course it will never do to run any risk of broaching the swamp again.

Comox coal claims are receiving a great deal of attention but neither the [?] Beaufort, or Baynes Sound has yet found a purchaser. The Union people are sanguine that capital to open their mine will be forthcoming or a sale offered before the close of next summer.

Since penning my official letters this morning, I have been informed that our Wellington neighbours have a price of coal cutting from 1.20 to 1.10 per ton and on that account the men have struck. In a note from Mr. Bermingham dated 19th ult, he tells me he had a talk with Admiral Cochrane of the ' Repulse' who he says is not very favourably impressed with Wellington coal - the Engineers dislike it very much & complain of the ash and clinker it makes. Mr.

(Page 78) Bermingham says he told the Admiral "it was very different with the Vancouver Coal Co. coal from Fitzwilliam Mine. Perhaps this little conversation might have led to the order for the Black Diamond cargo, referred to in the Directors Diary 21st ultimo?

We have wretched weather just now - everything blocked with snow, and we are looking for a severe winter. Fires are kept about the locomotive and at other places to keep pipes from freezing up. A large gang of Chinese are cleaning the Railway Track.

I shall be on the look out for Mr. Prior and will endeavour to make him contented with his new home. I suppose he is engaged for a few years? He will no doubt be found very useful, and of no small service, in keeping surveys up to the mark. This is a department now in arrears.

Our new clerk is getting fairly well posted in his duties. He is very attentive, punctual, and altogether a good man. I consider myself fortunate on getting Alport's place so well filled.

Hoping you are well and wishing you a Happy New Year.

I remain Dear Mr. Wild

Yours most truly

M. Bate

(Page 79)

3 Dec. 1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake and Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

I am obliged for your favor of the 28th ultimo, and now beg to request you to pay up the Judgment against Chantrell, and on receiving particulars I will at once remit the amount of Rodellos claim. You seem to have lost sight of my former letters asking you to pay the sum of Rodellos note, and not to allow judgment to issue, but I suppose that does not matter much.

Of course in paying up the judgment, you will examine and get possession of the note given by Chantrell to ascertain that the claim is correct. The note it is very likely will be wanted on Chantrell's return.

Please do not let it be known who is settling this business in Chantrell's interest. I am most anxious that my name should not be used.

Yours very Truly

Gentlemen

M. Bate

(Page 80)

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

I am extremely obliged for your very interesting letter of the 19th ultimo, and particularly pleased to learn that you had an opportunity of speaking to Admiral Cochrane [and?] Coal business generally. Should you be writing to him, or should you again see him would there be any harm in recommending him to invest in our Company Shares? It may be an advantage to have him hold a little of the Company's stock. While I am writing on this subject, I may mention that tenders are invited by the navy for a supply of coal, for the next year from the 5th May. To my surprise, a cargo from Fitzwilliam Mine was taken to Esquimalt the other day and I am thinking it is likely your conversation with Admiral might have led to the order. Could you, on receipt of this, do anything to prompt Broderick etc to offer our coal in preference to the Wellington? A word from you might have good effect. I enclose (Page 81) the advertisement so that you can say you have seen it, if you refer to the matter.

Dunsmuir had a strike on Monday last (1st). He told the men they were to work at reduction of 10 cents-per ton for mining, and every one of them threw down their tools! On the next morning, they were told to go on at the old rate. The fact is, as I am informed by hands, they (Diggle etc.) are getting nothing out of the concern.

If you can do so, please let me have two or three 800 to 1000 ton ships for Fitzwilliam mine. We are going along with the work at the Island pretty lively, have commenced the Bore. I before referred to, near the site Bell landed upon, and in about 4 to 5 months at the outside coal should be reached.

I am looking for a young Engineer by next 'Prince Alfred' who you will perhaps be aware is coming to attend to the surveying department and assist Bryden generally. [overwritten]

[P?] doings I have observed in the paper and I note your remark respecting him. He shall get nothing put in his way here if I know it.

The ‘Panther' and ['Larke'?] had long passages down I suppose shall be glad of their early return. The 'Constitution' is outside for Wellington Mine. I hope Mr. Rosenfeld will arrive safe and sound. Please give my regards to him.

The 'Otter' has been given 23 tons of Chase River coal for trial and reports very favourably upon it. Fully as good as Dunsmuir's they say. The small lot sent to you I expect would hardly be enough for a satisfactory test.

Capt. Harris of the 'Arkwright' seems to have a drunken mate and some of his crew are troublesome. The Captain himself is a patient, attentive and good fellow, and I am sorry he has any bother with his men. Emily's Grandmother, my Mother wants to get a large picture of her. Would you kindly inquire if we can get one or two copies on card only, like that she had framed. I am thinking perhaps they have the negatives, and can print them ad libitum.

With kind regards in which Mrs. Bate joins me.

I remain

yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 82)

10th. Dec 1873

Private Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen Re: Chantrell

I am duly in receipt of your favor of the 8th inst, and am pleased to note by it that you “are satisfied you would succeed in obtaining a note to set aside the judgment of the grounds of irregularity if we should apply for it." If you are still of the same opinion, and have not paid the amount of Judgment or settlement of the matter in any way, I am quite willing to go to the expense of $50.00 or even to $60.00 to get the judgment set aside. I [?] with Mr. Rodelle and gathered from him that he sold the note to Capt. Spalding (for a small consideration I believe) and Rodelle has nothing to do with the matter as far as I can understand. I have every confidence that you will do what is best both in my own interest and for the protection of Mr. Chantrell, and

I am, gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate

(Page 83)

17 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

Messrs Drake & Jackson

Victoria

Gentlemen

I am duly in receipt of your favor of the 11th inst with enclosures, and I now beg to forward you cheque for the amount of Chantrell's note, interest, and costs, viz $328.75

I am glad you have settled the matter.

On the 29th Sept last I left at the office of the Registrar General the deed of Chantrell's property, and my mortgage for Registration. Mr. Aikman promised to send the documents to me, after he had made the necessary entries, but he has not done so, Will you have the goodness to obtain the papers and transmit them to me under registration cover?

And, greatly oblige Gentlemen

Yours very truly

M. Bate (Page 84)

18 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.

Victoria

Dear Sir

I duly received yours of the 15th inst. with enclosures. Bro. Webb has executed a new Deed which has been duly acknowledged before N.B. Spalding. I went to get Webb’s Deed tonight but he was not at Home, and I am sorry I am unable to send it. His deed I know is not registered and both the vendor, or signer (the Company Secretary) and witness C.A. Alport are out of the Colony. I counter-signed the Deed, as did also Mr. Bryden; I will look up Webb to get his Deed of Transmission to you next week. You will know what can be done with it.

The Building will hardly be ready, as far as I can judge, before the end of Jan’y. at the earliest. We merely require to usual conditions in the Lease-nothing special that I am aware of, excepting what I previously wrote to you.

We have already insured in the Royal for $2000.00.

(Page 85)

The Building Committee tonight decided to accept your offer of a loan at 9% per annum. They wish to borrow $1200.00 for two years and I was requested to ask you, to make arrangements that we may draw as the money is required. The Deed of our property I herewith send you. Will you kindly prepare a Mortgage and send us by first opportunity? I will see the mortgage promptly executed by the trustees, and it shall be forwarded to you without delay. We require to draw part of the money next week, and will you have the goodness to let us know if we shall draw on you or if you will deposit the $1200.00 with your Bankers for our account? Whichever plan you choose will suit us.

We are exceedingly pleased that our petition was granted, and personally I do not doubt but Ashlar Lodge will prosper.

Heartily thanking you for, and reciprocating your kind wishes.

I am, very truly & fraternally yours

M. Bate

(Page 86)

22 Dec 73

Dear Mr. Bermingham

I have the pleasure to own the receipt of your kind favor of the 14th inst, and I have to thank you for your great goodness in getting Mrs. Bermingham to have the photographs of Mrs. Bate and myself enlarged. Unfortunately, we cannot secure pictures here equal to those produced in your city. We might be a long time before we get any more taken, and we therefore decided to let the artist dress up those sent to you in the best way he can. The face of my own likeness is not at all clear. We shall be glad to get a dozen of the Photos of Emily and Alport.

I was not aware you had an interest in the 'Arkwright'. I wish, however, you & Mr. Rosenfeld owned the whole of her. The Capt. of that vessel (Harris) seemed to take great care of things generally on both his voyages here, and judging from what I saw of him he is a much superior man in many respects to most of the shipmasters we get here. The donkey engine was out of order this last trip and we did some little repairs for him. He had an inexperienced driver on board and was watching the machinery himself on one or two occasions.

Mrs. Rosenfeld's return with improved health I am glad to hear of. Mr. Prior tells me that Mr. Rosenfeld said he would take a run up this way before long. We haven't had the 'Prince Alfred' to clean bottom for quite a time. If you conclude to send her here to be beached, one of these days perhaps Mr. Rosenfeld will then come and look at us? Please give my regards to him.

In looking after the San Francisco Gas Co., Mr. Rosenfeld is apparently displaying his usual foresight. I hope he will get a good price.

Broderick etc., I firmly believe do not know what conclude about to [This section is faint and seems all about loading delays] What they want [?] is gross exaggeration. The vessels [?] they refer to were at our wharfs about a day and not more. They made an unusually [?] had freight for to deliver [?] return trip were loaded in some 3 ½ hours. They do not give us credit for that. The Newcastle Coal was first put aboard, I told the weigher to be sure and well clean it, and to do so took extra time to load. Just as soon as the Captain of the 'Emma' complained or rather mentioned that he had made a long trip up and was in a hurry to get down, I sent word to the Island to fill the chute up quickly with Fitzwilliam coal, and the vessel left the same evening. I [?] assured Broderick and Co. that, at all times, we endeavour to serve their interests and will always give due attention to the wants of the vessels.

Chase River coal I think you will find will go well for steam, the ash being light when subject to draft, a deal of it seems to be carried away. We are only taking out about 10 tons a day of this coal.

With best wishes in which Mrs. Bate joins me

I remain Sincerely yours

M. Bate

(Page 88)

30 Dec 1873

Nanaimo

H.F. Heisterman Esq.

Victoria

Dear Sir

Your favor of the 22nd inst. duly came to hand. I herewith send you Webb's Deed that you may see what, if anything, can be done to get it registered. I am of the opinion that an acknowledgment made by myself would be of no service.

We are very thankful for your good offices in making arrangements to meet our drafts, and although Bros. Renwick and Mayer have not yet signified their intention to give our joint note for, say one half the sum we may draw to be paid in 12 months, I think we shall soon decide to do so.

With best wishes, I am (In great haste)

Yours very truly M. Bate

(Page 89)

5 Jan . 4 [1874]

Dear Mr. Bermingham

Accept a thousand thanks for the interest you have evinced and the trouble you have taken [anent?] the Navy Coal Contract. The letter to Messrs Broderick & Co and to Mr. James (copies of which you sent with your kind favor of the 6th ultimo) will no doubt do good. If we can get the War Vessels to take a little of our coal occasionally, we shall be satisfied. Capt. Egerton (one of Dunsmuir’s partners) who is at Victoria specially to see about the Contract, may have sufficient influence to get their Coal used entirely. On my first trip to Esquimalt, I shall call on Mr. Innes who perhaps might do something in the way of getting a Man O' War to call at our wharf once in a while. I verily believe our production of coal the present year will largely exceed that of any previous 12 months. The 'Dashing Wave' did not take all the old Douglas coal by nearly 1200 tons. We gave the 'California' 14 tons from the old pit on the 3rd and today we are under the obligation of loading the 'Black Diamond' on this side. As far as possible. we will retain the Old Douglas as you suggest, and send off the Fitzwilliam. I believe we shall have a full load for the 'Panther'.

(Page 90)

Mr. Robins mentioned in one of his late letters the substance of Mr. Rosenfeld’s conversation referring to the treatment of Captains, Naval officers, etc. and I have no doubt you are quite right in your opinion upon the effect of a little spirits etc. judiciously dispersed. Please thank Mr. Rosenfeld (for one) for his goodness in interesting himself on my behalf. I hope nothing will interfere with his intention to come up here. I shall be most pleased to see him before he again goes to Europe. If there is any chance of him not being able to come to Nanaimo with the 'Prince Alfred', I may arrange to meet him in Victoria. In the event of his reaching the latter place, however, I suppose he will come right on. The Directors will be highly gratified to learn of the new contract with Messrs Pope & Talbot at a reduction of 75 cents per ton. More though once of late the secretary has deplored our inability to get out [more? hard?] coal so that Mr. Rosenfeld may be enabled to quickly work out the [-----?] contract; and he has hinted that thereupon Mr. Rosenfeld would most likely obtain means of conveyance at lower rates - That happily has been accomplished.

Bichard told me (on our way to Victoria) that in 6 mos. time coal would be up - ever so high. His prognostication is not in a fair way of being reached. Some of the vessels he sends to Dunsmuir must have a great length of lay days. The 'Union' has been at Departure Bay 18 days for something less than 600 tons. We want a few more small vessels for Fitzwilliam Mine. There will be 2000 tons in the heap after the 'Park' is filled up.

It is very good of you to look after the photos we want. If you will kindly obtain one of the plain pictures of Emily @ 5.00. I think that will be suitable.

In my letter to Mr. Rosenfeld of the 22nd ult., I asked for information about an Engine for ballast and pile driving purposes. You will know exactly what will suit us. One rather more powerful than that of Cooper's we may do well to get one. I have a notion of attaching a crane to the engine we get, to be so fixed that we can turn it out of the way when not wanted.

Accept the united respects of Mrs. Bate and of

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 91)

7 Jan 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

I have to thank you for your very kind letter of the 28th of November, and would beg to say in reference to the purchase of shares on my account that I was not over anxious to buy at a high premium, and it will be advisable, I think, to wait a while to see if the number I want are obtainable at a lower figure. My faith in the future of the Company prosperity is unshaken. The prospects ahead are as good as they ever were - as far as the actual mining as concerned, and there is no reason why we should not go on quite as successfully as hitherto, but we must keep a sharp look out for leaks in every direction. Excessive freight and low prices we can hardly endure. I hope Rosenfeld will not use that advertisement in any way to the Company's disadvantage. He certainly is making a good thing out of his agency, and if he is not satisfied, it would be difficult to say what would satisfy him. He expects to get from us this year 38000 tons which will pay him $19,000.00 commission - a really handsome sum. Should he not obtain a commission for the Company on Charters i.e. Freight contracts? I think so. You will readily comprehend what a stimulus is given to our Wellington friends by realizing better prices than we obtain. I do not know if they are aware they get a higher rate than we do. I am inclined to believe they are, but getting such good returns has helped them wonderfully, and enabled them to carry out what they never could if they sold coal at about 4.50 per ton. You have perhaps heard that Bichard first applied to us for coal. He wanted to contract for the purchase of 2000 tons per month. Of course as he desired the coal for the San Francisco market I referred him, or rather his agent, to Mr. Rosenfeld.

(Page 92)

As regards the improvement of our works- of our production of coal, we, as you rightly say we want more push, and better organization of working plans, in a word we need less undoing. Jobs of many kinds are often started to be altered, abandoned etc., and I am perplexed at times to notice useless expenditure. I have lately introduced the matter of examining the ground on the opposite of the Bay from our Newcastle mine & the boring from Fitzwilliam [seam?] to Newcastle. Mr. Bryden approves the latter, but never seems to pay any attention to my propositions to go nearer the Wellington seam. There is a sort of family compact of Dunsmuir’s crowd, and I am very sorry my colleague is connected with them. He, of course, cannot help that, but his sympathies go with them, seems pleased, apparently, when anything is said in favour of the Wellington coal etc as against ours, and although he knows all the “family” movements, never lets out a word. It is like drawing a tooth to get him to speak about what Dunsmuir is doing at his mine. The Harewood Land, I am pretty certain, is now partly owned by the Wellington concern, and I think Mr. Bryden might have given a hint to let it be known what was going on. I have heard that Mr. Ward of Bank of BC has a share in Harewood. Last night I got a private note from him. He asks, "What do you think of Mr. Bulkley's purchase of the Harewood property? He seems disposed to go to work at once to get the coal to market. He talks of going to England by next steamer (i.e. 26th inst) to make necessary arrangements for rails and plant etc. I suppose that any thing that increases the trade to Nanaimo is good for your folks, and that making it a coal centre will help the trade in coal generally. Two San Francisco men are coming up this month re Baynes Sound Mine." I don't imagine Harewood will do us any more harm, for a year of two at any rate than take off some of our men. A class of overhands seems always glad to leave us. While it will not be wise perhaps to put any obstacles in the way of the new Harewood (Page 93) proprietors it will certainly not be politic to assist them. I fancy two or three or more of our miners have the contract for driving the tunnel at Harewood. None of Dunsmuir's men have offered, it is said. If good coal is found in the exploration about to be undertaken would it be worthwhile making any overtures to amalgamate? say by giving shares of Vancouver Coal Co for the Harewood. If Mr. Buckley, who I have heard is a man of means, is going home as Ward states I will request him, either by letter or personally if I see him to call at the company’s office. There might be a chance of finding out what land he wants, and of coming to a settlement about it. I informed Mr. Bulkley when he said he could not tell me how he would take his road that I would prefer corresponding with the Board before going into the matter, which we could not do [till?] his plans were decided upon. Mr. Prior will make an exceedingly (6) useful man here. He has surveyed the No.1 level and some of the [stalls?]. The level according to the survey is right under the [---way?] but as the stall furthest from the pit is 100 yards from the back of the level our upper or rise workings are probably quite safe. Since Prior has been here, excepting two or three days he has been going around with Bryden to get well posted. He now begins to feel as if he could walk alone.

[More Comox Company’s?] will be hard to deal with I am afraid. So much importance do they attach to the great iron ore discovery, for great it is that the Union share holders who are able to hold on are opposed to selling at all. Dr. Ash too might have bigger ideas his place by reason of its proximity to Texada. The Company might do well to try and deal with the Doctor and let Mr. Bryden go up and make a thorough examination of his place. It might be of more value than one would suppose from a mere walk over it.

Mr. Bell's bill of $35 seems very high for what he did here. In fact, beyond looking at the mines and going to Comox, nearly everything was done for him. He has a notion, it appears, that the Union Company's coal would be found nearer the sea at Comox. It would, in my opinion, be too deep altogether to go for either of the seams within 4 miles of Comox Harbour, or any stopping point. The coal at its deepest place in the Union Claim will be 100 fathoms seeming to the dip, which has been given - but there are years of work level free.

I am a little anxious about a good claim at Comox but still more anxious to see our works expand. This Wellington seam is turning out [115?] tons, 90 of which is conveyed to the wharf and a heap is accumulating at the slope head. My colleagues only smile when I tell them they will overtake us.

With best wishes I am dear Mr. Wild

Yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 94)

20 Jan 74

My Dear Sir

Expecting to see the ' Prince Alfred' here with you on board, about the 25th inst, we shall get all our wagons filled with coal ready to deliver to the steamer. I hope nothing will interfere with you or the 'Prince' to prevent your coming up this way as you intended when writing on the 5th. If I thought there was any probability of your not reaching this far, I would go to Victoria and meet you there. All being well however, I have no doubt you will come to Nanaimo if you get to Victoria.

I write officially by mail on one or two business matters - a copy of the letters you will be able to see here.

Looking soon for the pleasure of shaking your hand and with best wishes.

I am Very truly yours

M. Bate

John Rosenfeld Esq.

(Page 95)

21st Jan’y 74

My Dear Mr. Wild

In my letter to you of 7th instant, I referred to the supposed ownership of the Harewood Estate, and I mentioned that I had heard that Mr. W. C. Ward has some share in the concern, which seems quite probable from his reference to Mr. Bulkley in one or two letters he has written to me. Last night, I received a note from him on which he says: "Mr. Bulkley leaves for England by next 'Prince Alfred'- say on 26th. Is Mr. Wild now in London? If so, I thought I would give a letter to him as it would do no harm for him to see some of your Company in London, and I don't know any of the other Directors. I believe Mr. B has let a contract to run a tunnel to prove the coal to some extent.

In answer to Mr. Ward, I have told him you will likely be found in London, and I have dropped a note to Mr. Bulkley as follows:

My Dear Sir

Hearing that you are about to proceed to London, may I suggest that you call at this Company's office No 2 St, Mildred's Court, [Poulty?].

Probably some question or other affecting our mutual interest might be talked over and considered. In any case, I have no doubt our Directors and secretary will be pleased to meet you.

Wishing you a pleasant journey. I am etc”

Seeing that Mr. Ward is desirous of Mr. Bulkley calling on you, I should not have written to him, only I thought it might be well to keep on terms with him as friendly as possible - at any rate till it is seen how Harewood will pan out as the Gold diggers say.

In my official letter of today, I have informed the Board of Mr. Bulkley running and claiming a line from Harewood to the beach at the site of Bolton's "ways". The property, by the by, that Bolton bought is 3 lots- 12x3 Block 51 now belongs to Bank of B.C. and it may be that Ward wants to utilize it. He was offering the 3 lots a short time ago for $500.

Now with regards to a Railway from Harewood, if one is to be made, I should say every effort should be made to retain the tongue of land the Harewood folks wanted 10 years ago - that is the peninsula opposite the Newcastle mines. If feasible, it is more than probable Mr. Bulkley and his partners may prefer to get a right of way to the Bank’s lots at Nanaimo Harbour rather than go to Departure Bay which would be nearly two miles further. But the Board will desire to look to our own interest in the matter as paramount and there are these points to be dwelt upon: 1st. Is it wise to offer any advantage to Mr. Bulkley to bring a shorter road to Nanaimo Harbour, by which his expense making and running afterward would be comparatively [low?] 2nd. Would it not be better to give some inducement to get a longer road to a spot a little farther along the South West shore of Departure Bay than the "tongue" before alluded to. Of course in considering the matter, it maybe prudent to have in mind the probable relations the new firm may bear to us after a time, that is, the prospect of amalgamation, in some way, if Harewood should turn out well. All this, however, and more, the Directors will look to undoubtedly, at the proper moment. At present it is not easy to judge, or form an opinion what Mr. Bulkley is about.

You will be sorry to hear of the wreck of the 'Panther'. Nothing is known of the ['Goliath'?]. It is feared she too has met with some disaster if not gone down altogether, with all on board.

The weather just now is bitterly cold and part of the harbour is frozen over.

I remain, Dear Mr. Wild

Very truly yours

M. Bate

(Page 97)

21st Jan’y 4

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

Many, many thanks for your infinite goodness in sending our Photos: they are excellent, at least we think so. They are so much admired that Mrs. Bate wants to keep them, and it is not improbable that I may well trouble you to send us frames; that is, if Mrs. Bate keeps of the same mind. I will promptly send cheque on receipt of Bill.

On Sunday (25th) I shall be on the look out for Mr. Rosenfeld. All our wagons will be filled with coal and we shall let no other vessel interfere with the 'Prince's' coaling. Mr. Rosenfeld will find us nearly buried with snow, about 2 feet of the ground, and bitterly cold. The night of the day the ' Panther' (Some particulars of whose wreck I give in my official letter) and 'Goliath' left here it blew up a perfect hurricane up this way. Trees were toppled over by the dozen, and I thought the House was going down. I never remember anything like it.

(Page 98) The 'Goliath' is missing but I sincerely hope she will turn up.

I send Bills of lading of the 'Panther', 'Parks' and 'Mary Glover' cargoes imagining that they may be needed, as the Newspapers report the 'Parks' has put back to Royal Roads in distress.

Dunsmuir has done nothing the past week at the mine and as to his having plenty of coal, vessels come to me and say they can't get any at the Wellington wharf. With his present appliances if he gets out 180 tons a day [he his doing well?], but I don't think it will last long, 2 or 3 years perhaps.

The Douglas coal seems safe. At least we are getting no water from the swamp. We are better off with means of pumping than we were last winter. Seattle Gas Company [are?] sending to us for Douglas Coal. I don't suppose they will consume much. Our men are beginning to go to the new diggings already: the 'Otter' takes the first batch. There is not, however, many miners among those now leaving us.

The 'Antioch' is still at Departure Bay not yet loaded. The tug 'Grapple' has been waiting for her 4 days.

Accept kindest regards of Mrs. Bate and of yours most sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 99)

[Note at top of page, written in red ink.” Handed to Lucky [sic] to post and register]

31st Jan’y 1874

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island

C. N. Chantrell Esq.
[Mendelian?] Villa
Rams gate, Kent

England

My Dear Sir

I was informed the other day by Mr. C. A. Young that he had received a letter from you written at the above address. I need hardly mention that I was much pleased to learn that you were 'safe'. All sorts of rumours have been current here regarding you, and it was intimated, about a month ago, that we need not expect to hear from you again, that you had settled in the vicinity of Fort Edmonton and did not intend to come here any more etc. etc. That all these reports were groundless your letter to Mr. Young partly affirms, and I trust

(Page 100) you will be preparing to return hither by the time this gets into your hands. Mr. Young will have told you, doubtless, of the trouble and expense I have been put to in order to prevent the sale of your land by Public Auction at a considerable abatement, perhaps, in what I would look upon as its real value. It appears [?] Rodello, of course, needs a promissory note of yours for $180.00. The note Rodello sold to Spalding for a small sum, I am told, and Spalding filed the note in the court at Victoria (--?) for the amount of it with some 5 years interest - you who were out of the jurisdiction of the Court was cited to appear, and as you did not and the amount of the claim was not paid.

Judgment was given against you and would have been satisfied, out your land had I not advanced the amount of the Judgment with costs viz. $328.75.

Wishing to hear from you, and, at all events, to give you every opportunity to redeem the mortgage. I have kept it without taking any steps to foreclose although the interest has not been paid for over a year, and I write now mainly to say I am quite willing to take a new Mortgage for the sum of my loan advance and interest for another 6 months or year. But for the protection of your property, you should have an agent here, if you are not coming out right away yourself. Your house and perhaps part of your land might be leased to advantage and rightly looked after if you had a duly authorized agent in this place.

Mr Young tells me he is quite willing (Page 99) to act as your Agent, and I would strongly recommend you to send him a full Power of Attorney. Properly executed, and attested before a proper person so that your business and interests may be rightly attended to.

Hoping you are well, and begging you to treat the note in as confidential manner as you can.

I am

yours very truly.

M. Bate

(Page 101)

5 Feb 74

My Dear Mr. Bermingham

As you might suppose, I was delighted to meet Mr. Rosenfeld. He is just the wide-awake, vivacious person I took him to be. And his disposition is as genial as openhanded. He will doubtless give you the gist of our conversation: these questions which Mr. Rosenfeld wishes to be always dealt with in a confidential manner shall be duly regarded, and his directions touching foreign shipments be implicitly followed.

I think I told you in my last that we are more than pleased with the pictures and Mrs. Bate is very loath to part with them. I enclose a cheque for the bills of our own and Emily and Alport's photos which I believe you will find correct amount of Cheque $86.00. Is there anything I can possibly do for you to compensate for your great kindness?

(Page 102)

Bichard is still drawing freely on Dunsmuir, Diggle etc. for coal. The old man (Dunsmuir) got on a bender last week and stowed himself away somewhere. I think he turned up a day or two ago in a very shaky condition.

I have ordered one engine in my official letter today. We think it as well to get a 6 ½ or 7 inch cylinder so that we might use the engine for temporary winding purposes in exploration etc. The model of Cooper and Taylor's Donkey will be the thing, and I believe you know exactly what that is.

Some six or seven of our men went by the stmr. California for [C----?] but strangers have come fortunately to take their places and we are not at present shorthanded. It is very probable, however, that many more will leave us. We shall try to convince all we can to stay.

You have heard perhaps ere this that Broderick got the navy contract. I expect Egerton has a good deal of influence among the men of war Captains and Engineers and that on that account his coal will be wanted. We have no need to fret about the matter, and if they don't patronize us we can't help it.

We have struck coal about [2?] feet thick at the bottom of Fitzwilliam Slope today, but do not know for certain if we have the regular seam. It will not lake long I hope to find out.

Please give the united regards of myself and Mrs. Bate to Mr. Rosenfeld and accept the same yourself

from yours very sincerely

M. Bate

(Page 103)

9 February 74

My Dear Cousin

I was delighted to get your kind letter on [26th?] Oct last. It does seem strange that 17 ½ years should have passed since I left home, without any correspondence between us, and now we have "set the ball going let us keep it rolling." You must not suppose my dear William that I have forgotten you because I have not written to you. My dear Mother can tell you how often I have enquired about you and the other Bates-George, Isaac, Thomas, John and Joseph, our cousins, some of whom you tell me are at Walsall. I have asked more particularly about you, however, as I saw nothing of the others for some years before I left England. I am surprised to learn that those of our late Uncle Joseph's family which you saw at Walsall would not condescend to speak to you. I suppose I might be the possessor of more wealth than any of